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Author Topic: Stabilizer blocks  (Read 1283 times)

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Offline Dammitjim

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Stabilizer blocks
« on: November 04, 2011, 09:41:04 AM »
I don't know why my search isn't returning anything on this, but why do we put "stuff" under a bare stabilizer foot? I see some people have some round discs that come attached to theirs and some people put wood under them. Isn't it enough to just lower the bare stabilizer foot against the ground? Maybe I don't need that because I have only been to sites where there is concrete?
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Offline bupkis

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2011, 09:48:42 AM »
LIGHT TRAILER JACK BASEPADS scroll down



Model 23035

Provides firm footing on loose ground.

Set of four 6" diameter pads.
Easy to install; Hardware provided.
Rubber sleeve prevents rattle during travel.
"All we want are the facts, ma'am"
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Offline gec66

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2011, 09:54:30 AM »
It really depends on the stabilizer base and the surface.  My old pup had really small "feet", so unless I was on a hard surface I used a wood block to spread out the "footprint".  My newer pup has "sand pads" on the stabs which handles pretty much any surface fine so the only reason I need wood blocks sometimes is for un-level ground at the point of stab contact.
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Offline Dammitjim

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2011, 09:58:38 AM »
Ok, then I don't need them since we only camp where there is a concrete pad.
How hard do you guys crank these down? The moment I feel a good amount of resistance from ground contact, I basically stop.
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Offline Retired Alex

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2011, 10:01:48 AM »
The main reason is to spread the weight of the pressure point of the stab foot over a wider area. As an example, find a large piece of foam and poke your finger into it. Not much pressure required to penetrate into the foam. Now place a square of something solid on the foam and push again. Considerable more force required to penetrate the same distance as before and as you increase the area, more force is required.
On soft ground this prevents the stabilizers from penetrating into the ground.

The stabilizers should only be snug. Not a very technical term I know. There should only be enough force on them to prevent the trailer from rocking, not enough to put any twist to the frame.
Alex & Mary Burnett
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Offline jamesmc321

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2011, 11:48:15 AM »
I have the pads shown above... love them... even on wet ground.. they might sink in a little and stop (almost the same as putting wood under them).  Well worth the money IMO.
2012 Family Camping Days: 3 (Scout Camping - 15)
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Offline Unstable_Tripod

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2011, 02:29:58 PM »
Gee, I have never camped on a cement pad.

How tight should they be?  I give mine another half turn after they make contact with the ground.
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Offline barbjmj

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2011, 11:03:57 PM »
I too have the pads shown in this thread. However, if I'm on soft ground especially sandy area then I put 12" square blocks under foot. Feels more stable then. If on a cement pad (like at many state parks) I just use the pad. I crank until I feel resistance then just a nudge more.
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Offline freenaz

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2011, 12:21:20 AM »
I have the above pads too but since I did an axle flip I have to use blocks now.
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Offline LjohnSaw

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2011, 01:02:11 AM »
Through trial and error -I use blocks to keep the stabilizer as far away from vertical as possible.  The more of an angle, the better it seems to halt the shimmies when someone moves in the other bunk.  Kind of like putting a support against your fence when a post breaks.  If you put the support nearly vertical next to the post, it doesn't do much good.  Put it at a low angle (45* or less), and it is really strong.
John in No. Calif. (near Sacto)
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Offline Flyfisherman

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2011, 01:04:34 AM »
What I've found out with stabilizers ... be they the BAL crank down or the stab ... is after having been set into position they will need to be re-adjusted after a day or so, especially if it rains.  Having used just some plywood squares under the stabilizers I've found it required less adjustments, i.e., the plywood prevented the metal ends of the stabilizers from settling further into that pea rock graveled sites - really so if it is sand or sod. When setting up at home in the concrete driveway, even the plywood squares have worked better.
Fly
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But still have the old 9' X 9' Coleman Dome Tent!

Offline Greywuff

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #11 on: November 06, 2011, 07:39:34 AM »
I had a fence installed at my home the summer before I got my Pup. There were a few short blocks of 6X6 treated lumber left over. I originally threw them in the garbage, but I couldn't sleep with that and retreived them, thinking that some day they might come in handy. After I got the Pup, I took 4 of the blocks, each just a bit over a foot long I guess, and attached a length of a broken tie down strap on them using roofing nails. Now I have 4 blocks of wood with a carry handle on each.
When I pop her up, I put one under each stabilizer. Keeps her nice and steady and and in a lot of cases there is very little jacking to have to be done. These blocks take 6 inches out of the equation!  Course, there is a down side to all of this... you gotta store them someplace when they arent being used. In my situation, I just slide them back inside the Pup on the floor when Im closing her down and they just lay inside on the floor, ready for use next time I need them.
I realize that it is costly to go out and buy 6X6  treated material, but it was something I had laying around and just put them to use rather than tossing them. At some point in the future, I may go to something else, but for now, I like using these blocks.
"...I have learned to be content, regardless of the circumstances. " Philippians 4:11 NIV
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Offline jlynn58

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #12 on: November 06, 2011, 07:53:59 AM »
 :) I use 6 x 6 blocks of wood also. I sanded the edges down and painted them black looks neat. Not just a piece of wood under the pup.
Keep On Camping !!!  [PU]
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Offline Greywuff

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #13 on: November 06, 2011, 08:54:00 AM »
Darn...you mean now I gotta paint them?!?!?!?!?!?
"...I have learned to be content, regardless of the circumstances. " Philippians 4:11 NIV
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Offline Greywuff

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Re: Stabilizer blocks
« Reply #14 on: November 06, 2011, 08:58:22 AM »
"...I have learned to be content, regardless of the circumstances. " Philippians 4:11 NIV
Pat & Karen
www.iamhiscreations.com

 


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