1995 Jayco 1406 Cardinal 6 Designer Series Roof Rebuild

Discussion in 'Roof/Floor Repair & Maintenance' started by benandbobbi, Dec 27, 2012.

  1. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    What originally looked to us like a couple end boards needing replaced turned into to entire roof coming off and apart .....

    As mentioned in our introduction, we traded a boat for a camper, still not sure who got the better deal ... http://www.popupportal.com/index.php?topic=66547.0

    After our second lift attempt at home, we discovered why we had to assist the lift posts up per previous owner - the catches were broke on 2 of them and they poped out of the guides on us. Goiod thing my father-in-law was around, because the roof was teetering on opposite posts. Well, since my wife and kids were going to be inside, i decided i needed to fix it and fix it right.

    Good news for us, our brother-in-law works for an RV dealer - very helpful, downside, he's about 11 hrs away! Got us some new posts and springs ordered, and started looking to see how to install. Seemed easy enough - will save that for another thread!

    One issue we new about was the rear board was so rotted, the plate for the canvas support had fallen free and we could not prop up the canvas for the bed. it must have been on it's last splinters when we were looking at it, or again, maybe we were blinded by the joy of getting rid of the boat! Looking back now, i don't recall seeing the duct tape either!

    [​IMG]

    After a call to Jayco customer support, this should not be a repair done with the roof in place, because the end caps are hard shells, and add to the roof structure, so off the roof was coming. And thats whne the fun begins .....

    With a big thanks to this thread - http://www.popupportal.com/index.php?topic=61335.0 WE decided I could do this.
     
  2. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    So, after a couple more phone calls to Jayco support, and a little "what the heck, i will figure it out," some hopfully good photos and a few notes, off came the canvas. Let me tell you, the look on my wifes and kids face sure was telling me they are not sure i will get this thing back together.

    This started back in August.

    It is now obvious to us that the rear board needs replaced -

    [​IMG]
     
  3. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    How we got the top off -

    First we had to find a place to put the camper to work on it. There is no room in the garage, renting a storage unit did not seem reasonable, since my time to dedicate to the project is limited. Lucky for us, we have a neighbor who let us use part of their barn to put the camper base in.

    I built 3 sets of collapsible saw horses and purchased a couple 16' 2x6 for the beams between the horses. They weren't quite finished.

    Fast forward a little to December 16 - My 40th birthday! Timing had it that we were having some family and friends over for a lasagna dinner - good to bribe family to come say Happy Birthday to me! Also turns out my neighbor is having a few friends over to watch the game. What a perfect opportunity to get a few extra hands to lift off the top, after all, it is only down to the bolts of 3 of the lift posts.

    ... 30 minutes before kick off. neighbor volunteered a couple of the guys from his game watching, and dinner was almost done.

    I screwed a couple 2x4's together overlapping them so they would be about 12' long, this would allow them to stick out a couple feet on both sides of the camper. i put one in the front and one in the rear.

    I set the saw horses up on each side of the camper. they are shorter than the top of the camper so it would be easier to work on the roof when removed.

    I slide the 2x4's in and set the roof down on them and who knew what inside, then got the posts unbolted. Ran across the street to get the guys back over, and talked my wife into driving the truck. With 4 guys lifting the roof, another holding the brace that was dangling inside, and my son doing his 8yr old best to supervise, we pulled the camper out from under the roof, set the down on the saw horses, thanked everone for their help, drove the camper down the street and put it away and back in time for dinner! Worked like a charm!

    Sorry no pictures of this fun, i was in a time crunch.
     
  4. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    a few days later, i started taking the panels apart and here is what we found -

    like anyone who has been through something similar and is reading this, here is what you expected, and what we are learning about.

    After finally finding all the screw heads with pins on the other end holding this thing together, i was able to get the top seperated! I think at one time, they were screws, but not much left of the thread section. I am not sure what was holding this in one piece - must have been the thick white tape.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    this is what it looked like behind the end cap. between the 2 roof halves is supposed to be a strip of wood holding the panels together.

    [​IMG]

    while trying to get a closer look, lots of dark wood pieces fell to the ground.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. cullinan18

    cullinan18 New Member

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    Aug 14, 2012
    Thanks for the detailed pics of the damage. This looks like way more project than I could handle. Good luck, buddy.
     
  7. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    Got some work done with this past week off, even got some help from the family!

    Heres a bad pic, but the little ones enjoyed breaking off the foam, they weren't too crazy about the wet stuff, but we actually had one dry corner.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    This is how i seperated the bottom (inside) aluminum skin from the foam, pretty much the same for the top, except much easier. I used a 12" drywall blade and luckily did not cut through the aluminum skin. After i got down to the last 4 feet of foam, my father-in-law walks over and says - "Did you try using a wire to cut the skin loose!?" At that point i said him i would finish this way, but telling me awhile ago would have been much better. The thinking there is using something like a piano wire, and using it like a saw, or i think you can buy something similar at the hardware store. I know they make small ones for cutting hard to reach PVC.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    With all the foam removed and taken to the city dump, the fun part of the glue was next. I used Klean-Strip KS-3 Premium Stripper as jab2181 mentioned in his post also seen here http://www.wmbarr.com/product.aspx?catid=72&prodid=117

    It took a few tries, but once i learned how much to apply, it came off really nice. The first few tries were too thin, I was only using enough to make the glue look wet. It was barely getting through the stuff. I had to apply it thick enough that you could see it spread over, kinda like real thin icing.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
  11. fmbhappycamper

    fmbhappycamper PuP Power

    4,358
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    Aug 27, 2010
    WOW. Good Job, Family [8D]
     
  12. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    Both top panels are ready to go, minus full quick scrub, and now to figure out the rebuild method. New Years eve i went to the local lumber yard because they sell stuff in 16' lengths, the local HD or Lowes only has 12' here. Come to find out the lumber yard was actually resonably priced. They had DRY pressure treated 1x4x16. By dry, i mean not dripping the treatment like the above mentioned stores usually are. They also had some 3/4" foam in stock. I ran down for a quick look, because they were closing at 1 due to the holiday. Good thing i didn't take the truck, or i would have bought it.

    After getting back home i rechecked the one good piece from the roof, and the aluminum extrusion - the old piece was 1" thick, and the extrusion set for the same.

    So, now i have an issue or an opportunity.
    Option 1- Go with the 1x4x16, which measures at 3/4", use the 3/4" foam, and apply a 1/4 layer of maple or oak ply or luan to the interior side. Or ...
    Option 2- get 5/4 decking board, rip it in half long ways, check the local stores for 1" thick foam and use that.

    With option one, i am not sure if i would reuse the interior alumin panel. I guess that would only be an option if i used the luan, and not the oak or maple ply, a nice stain choice, they would look really nice. Down side there, is i would have to eventually work it down into the rest of the camper.... option 2 would require me to use the interior alumin panel.

    i will post another thread looking for advice there, and i will put a link to that thread in this one.

    I am back to work tomorrow, and on my lunch break, i will draw it up and see how the new roof supports will look. I plan to have the three main runners (middle and each side), i plan to have full width cross braces at both openings in the roof, and most likely match the other side. I will add pieces in for the shower track and door catchs also.
     
  13. jab2181

    jab2181 New Member

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    Jul 4, 2012
    Looks very familiar, need any help or ideas let me know!
     
  14. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    jab2181
    I did want to reply to your post in your thread about the AC supports. I didn't want to take away from your camper. Mine does have 2 cross braces that at one time were attached to the roof, they are for the sliding cabinet. Do these serve the same purpose as roof supports, or do i need to look into something more?
     
  15. bols2Dawall

    bols2Dawall S.W. Ontario

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    May 19, 2010
    Nice job . Just a reminder though to make sure the PT wood doesn't come into contact with Aluminum. The chemicals will eat the aluminum .
     
  16. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    i did not know the PT would do that. So PT is not the right option then, because i have to glue the aluminum to the wood.
     
  17. bols2Dawall

    bols2Dawall S.W. Ontario

    1,173
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    May 19, 2010
    Maybe some one else can chime in but perhaps there's a sealer you could use on the PT .
     
  18. jab2181

    jab2181 New Member

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    Jul 4, 2012
    Reply on mine anytime, the cabinet slides I believe do not serve anything other that for the cabinet. The ac braces give it a lot more structure and will give it a little more strength for our large roofs.
     
  19. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    End cap reconstruction –
    Recall, the old wood is badly rotted, this is the best piece I had to work with for the end caps! I was able to get good pieces for the ribs behind the end caps, well most of them ….. when i took the rear cap off, it fell. when it hit the ground, the wood did not hold up very well. I did not know plywood had string inside it. if you look close at the two piece panel, there are 2 strings connecting the 2 halves.

    [​IMG]

    To get started building the new end caps I tried to make some assumptions – go ahead, yell it out!
    Assumption 1 – the roof should be flat, why, because there is nothing in the middle of the roof to hold any type of curve.
    Assumption 2 – the roof is the same width from front to back.
    Assumption 3 – both the front and rear end caps are the same.
    So now I start measuring … end caps first.
    I took the piece in the picture above, and kept measuring till I found the widest section. See assumption 1, if the roof is flat, the top and bottom edge of the end caps are straight. Well, when looking at the end, the wood does not look rotten, but it is about ¼” narrower. Hum, does that mean there should be a bow in the roof? If so, how does it hold the shape in the middle, and how in the heck did they keep that form in the shop originally?
     
  20. benandbobbi

    benandbobbi Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    backing up a little to catch up –
    Last weekend I made some progress. I went ahead and cut the board to length and to the widest width, figuring I can cut it down easier that adding to it. Also traced out the gussets as close as possible, assuming again, the 2 on the left are the same as the 2 for the right. I used the aluminum piece that fit under the endcap as a template for the bottom piece, and to get the width dimension. Originally the back piece and bottom pieces were stapled together without the edges cut to the matching angles, so there was a big gap where they came together. The gussets were the only things holding their shape. For the new part, I cut all the edges so they would butt up against each other, glued and stapled them together. I built the front piece, then tried to fit it to the rear cover, and seen the error in assumption. This is when I found out assumption number 3 was wrong, so I had to make different gusset for the rear, and bottom plate.
    And here they are …..

    [​IMG]

    Took a little modifications here and there to get the end caps to fit over, but we got them back where it looked like they belonged – the dirt and stain marks from the old wood were not cleaned off yet – good for me this time! I am almost certain the original piece was cut using a jig saw, and no two pieces cut the same. The original gussests did not fit the cover curvature very well, and the front board was very wavy compared to the aluminum cover edge.
     

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