1997 Viking 2060ST rebuild (floor, front compartment)

Discussion in 'Camper Restoration Projects' started by Dubbya, Apr 5, 2012.

  1. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    I'll be using three sheets of 4'x8'x5/8" tongue and groove Exposure 1 OSB with PL400 adhesive in the joints.

    Regarding waterproofing, I will be sealing and edges of the floor with "cut sealant" (paint) and treating the areas inside the wheel wells with sealant and perhaps a can of rock guard.

    I'm also considering adding mudflaps and a rubber flap 4-6" below the pup's front cross member, to keep the bulk of any road spray from working it's way under the frame and into the bottom edges of the sidewalls while in tow. Judging by the condition of the floor I pulled out, I'd say those are the main areas to focus on.

    Based on what I've seen just tearing my floor out and according to everything I've read on sealing exposed OSB on RV's, it seems that the experts all agree that it's best to let it "breathe".

    After having given it a great deal of thought, I see no point in spending the cash to seal the entire bottom side of the floor with anything impermeable. There are just too many areas where water can penetrate the wood. Bolt holes, screws, joints, staples, hatches, doors, vents, trim, windows, the list goes on.

    Ask any Architect or roofer and they'll all tell you the same thing. No matter how careful you are or how much money you spend on sealants, in our climate, moisture is always going to get in. The smart thing to do is limit the amount and give it somewhere to go.

    That's my .02 on it, your mileage may vary.
     
  2. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    Re: 1997 Viking 2060ST rebuild (adding floor joists)

    Here's a closeup showing the 1" end tabs after bolting the 1-1/2" angle iron pieces together.

    (Click the thumbnail image to enlarge).
    [​IMG]

    And here's the completed floor joist ready for installation.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. TN900r

    TN900r E. Tennessee

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    TN
    I started my floor replacement process on my Rockwood. Can you give me any idea as to how your walls are attached to the floor? The floor stops at the front and back wall and the sides appear to be on top of the floor. Are they just stapled from underneath?
    Any clue would be appreciated.

    Thanks,TN900r
     
    Dan from Troup likes this.
  4. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    You'll have to remove the outer skins on each wall to find the screws that anchor the wall framing through the floor and into the trailer frame. There really aren't that many screws holding the whole thing together!
     
  5. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    I've finished building and installing the additional floor joists. The pieces I've added are highlighted in green.

    [​IMG]

    Here's the trailer from the front. The frame has been wire brushed and painted using Tremclad semi-gloss rust paint and I'm quite pleased with the results.

    [​IMG]

    PAINT:
    In total, I used a 3" brush and small roller to apply 1 quart (liter) and 3-1/2 cans of Tremclad semi-gloss black spray paint. That leaves me a 1/2 can of spray left for touch-ups.

    Of course, it's much faster to paint with the spray cans but I saved a few bucks and spent the afternoon doing something productive with my 13 year old daughter who quickly got the hang of things. Best of all, now that she's got an investment in the project, it's great to see her take credit for her accomplishment. I've gotta say, it's very, very cool to see as a Dad. *+1 on the "Good Dad" index!*

    NOTE: If I had to do it over again, I'd roll the frame onto its' side and lean it against the wall to paint the undercarriage. That in and of itself would have made things easier, faster and much less painstaking than trying to paint while laying on the floor.

    FYI: WD-40 and a handful of rags work wonderfully to remove fresh paint from your hair, skin, glasses and anything else! Handy to know after you've been wiggling around on the drop sheet your daughter has just dripped a quart of paint on! [LOL]

    I gave it a day to dry and start curing then sorted out the main wiring. Considering it was the original wiring, it was still in great shape so I trimmed the ends, cleaned the ground block and reused it all. Prior to affixing the ground block, I sanded my new paint right down to bare metal so I'm sure I'll have a solid ground connection.

    [​IMG]

    Prior to removing the trailer wiring, I'd taken the precaution of zip-tying it all together so it wouldn't get tangled and so that I'd know which strings went where. After sorting it all out, I laid it in 5/8" wire loom and strung it through the frame from front to back. Using 5/8" loom is plenty large enough and it'll allow me to run additional strings of wire for brakes and/or backup lights later on down the road.

    [​IMG]

    NOTE: It's not necessary but it sure keeps things tidy so if you're going to use split wire loom, make sure you leave the seam pointing down so that the wiring is easily accessible when need be and so that water can drain out.

    [​IMG]

    Since I'd already removed the wheels, I took the opportunity to repack the wheel bearings. Now we're ready for three sheets of 5/8" Tongue in groove, Exposure 1 OSB decking!

    I've drawn up my cut sheet and I'll get the "handy helpers" at Home Depot to cut them to size for me. Since it's free and they have the big table saw, experience has taught me that as long as they make the mistakes, it's much easier (less expensive for me) for them to re-cut a piece and it'll save me having to fill my garage with sawdust.

    True story: I built a cabinet for my wife's birthday last month. The cut list, measurements and cut orders were clearly printed out on a sheet of paper. I needed 1 sheet of 3/4" Maple plywood for my project. By the time they were done, they'd made a bunch of mistakes, used THREE sheets of plywood and it didn't cost me a dime until they gave me a stack of pieces that were all correctly sized with the wood grains all running in the correct directions. I saved about $100 that day! LOL!
     
  6. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    Painting Camper Step with Duplicolor Bed Armor

    I couldn't make it to the building center to pick up my OSB sheathing after work, so I gave up on that for the day and used the time to paint the camper step with Bed Armor.

    Even with a 2" wide strip of grip tape, that smooth painted step sure did get slippery in the rain. I've almost wiped out more times than I can count and promised I'd solve that with the rebuild.

    At $20 (CDN) a can, the Bed Armor is a little pricey but well worth the money if it keeps someone from twisting an ankle, breaking an arm or leg.

    After scuffing the freshly painted (Tremclad rust paint) step with steel wool, I masked up the grip tape, surrounding camper frame and step framing then went to town with 3 coats of Bed Armor. I could have removed the grip tape but thought it would be better to just leave it be as the stuff is still in great shape and isn't coming off any time soon.

    [​IMG]

    Allowing for 30 to 45 minutes between coats, I sprayed a heavy first coat holding the spray can at approximately 12" making sure I had even coverage. I was a little concerned that I'd sprayed it on too thick but soon noticed that the shine began to disappear and coarseness of the surface came through as the paint dried.

    After 45 minutes, the first coat came out perfectly even with a 400 grit sandpaper-like coarseness to it, precisely what I wanted. While holding the spray can at 15", I gave it a second, lighter coat using short bursts to start giving it some texture.

    For the third coat, I held the can at 18", again using really short bursts to spatter the paint more randomly. I decided to stop at 3 coats as I didn't want to lose the contours and crisp definition of the drain holes.

    [​IMG]

    It turned out exactly as I'd hoped it would.

    [​IMG]

    I brought the truck in this morning, so take my cut sheet and swing by the Home Depot on the way home to pick up the OSB, PL400 adhesive and PVC edge trim that the bottom edges of the camper's side panels rest in.
     
  7. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    Re: 1997 Viking 2060ST rebuild (replacing the OSB floor)

    I brought my cut list and the DW to pick up three sheets of 5/8" tongue and groove OSB and the rest of the materials I'd need to put the new deck on with.

    I've included a printable image of the cut list for anyone who cares.

    Note: Both the male and female joints on the top (front) piece are to be cut off since it'll be fastened perpendicular to the bottom two pieces.

    [​IMG]

    One issue I came across was that the heights on the intersecting frame members differ. The manufacturer solved this by laying down 1" wide strips of luan paneling between the frame and OSB decking but I wanted as much frame support as I could get. Since most of the frame members are 1-1/4" to 3" wide, I solved this by using 4" vinyl wall cove base which I cut to length or into 2" wide strips as required.

    The cove base is exactly 1/8" thick, precisely the depth I needed to make up the height differences. Cove base is easy to work with, won't rot and doesn't compress much under pressure. Home Depot sells the stuff in 20' rolls for about $16. Bah! I needed about 30' and it wasn't the best use of money.

    That being said, if you've got the time and inclination, the required pieces are less than two feet long, easy enough to find in the garbage bin at any commercial flooring shop.

    [​IMG]

    After laying the vinyl strips in place, I put the deck panels in place and began to fasten the front piece with 10# x 1-1/2" Wafer Head self tapping screws at 16" O/C and 8" O/C at the seam(s). Other than the Robertson drive heads and the over-aggressive (IMHO) tapping threads on them, as you can see in the photo, these are virtually identical to what the manufacturer used.

    [​IMG]

    As per the manufacturer's instructions, the tongue and groove and all joints will receive a bead of LePage PL 400 subfloor and deck adhesive and the cut edges will be painted with Exterior latex paint to help prevent water from wicking in.

    After seeing the results of OSB deck edges having been exposed to moisture, I was pleased to find that the CIL exterior latex primer has mold and mildew resistance built in. Meh, it can't hurt but I think that a few well placed beads of silicone should prevent that from becoming a problem anyway.

    [​IMG]

    Here, the front piece of decking has been fastened, though not tightly on edges meeting with the sidewalls. I picked up the PVC outside corner moldings which will need to slip between the frame and decking before being stapled in place on either side of the camper. They're not quite as roomy as what the manufacturer used but they're pretty much the same profile, still look great and I'm thinking they'll work just as well to secure the bottom edges of the exterior sidewall panels.
     
  8. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    Whoopsie, forgot to post the last pic...

    [​IMG]

    So, I've got the edges of the OSB painted with the exterior latex primer (black tint). Being that the smallest can of paint they'd sell me was a quart, I still had tons left, so I painted a few inches underneath the decking where the OSB will rest atop the outer frame. I reasoned that if moisture does find its' way between the OSB and frame, it'd likely be best to prevent it from soaking into the wood where it can't get air to dry out.

    In addition, the "Rocker Guard" I'll be spraying on the wood and frame inside the wheel wells requires that the wood be primed so that the coating can adhere to it.

    Well, I still have a ton of primer left and I'm having a tough time resisting the urge to coat the whole underside of the deck! There's no real purpose in it so I'm just going to leave it be.

    We'll be off to Disneyland next week so I won't be posting any more progress shots until we get back.
     
  9. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    Got back from Disneyland on Friday night and had the weekend to get some more work done.

    To recap, I've glued and screwed down the 5/8" OSB and painted a 4" border of exterior latex primer around the outer edges on both the top and bottom sides, cut out the wheel wells and primed all the cuts.

    As I'd anticipated, the seams didn't quite line up flush and the screw heads create depressions in the surface of the OSB. To remedy this, I used Plani-Patch flooring patch with liquid latex additive. The latex helps the cement-based patch to adhere to the OSB and helps it remain hard but somewhat flexible, exactly what I needed in this application. Plani-patch strengthens the joints, allows me to feather out any height differences gradually and avoid any screw depressions or surface defects from showing through the vinyl flooring.

    Flooring installers use this stuff on almost any surface be it concrete, wood, existing vinyl flooring or subfloor sheeting and it sticks like poop to a wool blankie, especially with the liquid latex in it.

    Here's a shot of the products used.
    [​IMG]

    And here's a shot after having applied two light layers.
    [​IMG]
    The trick here is to mix it to the same consistency as drywall mud and apply the patch as smoothly as possible. As long as it's still pretty fresh, you can easily scrape out any ridges or blobs using a putty knife. Once the patch hardens, it's markedly more difficult but still quite "doable".

    I'll have to do one more layer on the left of the "T" where the center seam meets the intersecting seam before I can loose-lay the new vinyl and install the wheel wells tonight.
     
  10. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    I also painted the wood and metal surfaces of the wheel wells with "Rock Guard" and used 3/4" anodized aluminum flat stock with self tapping screws to fasten home made 10" x 14" mudflaps.

    [​IMG]

    The flaps themselves were cut from an old rubber welcome mat that needed replacing. A new 18"x30" rubber welcome mat will run about eight bucks while actual rubber mudflaps start at about $20.

    The step framing (angle iron bolted to the camper frame) jutted about a 1/2" into the wheel well, so I used my side grinder and cutting wheel to smooth it out, painted the edges and applied another quick blast of rock guard prior to installing the flap on the curb side.

    Here it is installed.
    [​IMG]

    This should help prevent the wheel from sand blasting the freshly painted step! [:D]

    A 9'x13' (117 square feet) piece of roll end vinyl flooring ran me $160 plus $20 for a part bag of patch and a 1/2 jug of liquid latex. *Score!* I opted for the foam backed commercial grade vinyl as I know all to well how paper backing reacts to moisture. This should help prevent water stains from bleeding through and discoloring the vinyl. The premium grade flooring is thicker than most utility grade flooring products and perfect for this application since the thicker foam backing helps hide surface imperfections inherent in OSB.

    This stuff doesn't need to be glued down so I'll loose lay it, cut it in and use the interior wall and cabinet framing to pin it down. It's heavy enough where it won't go anywhere. In the event that the new flooring gets cut or burned and does need replacing, I'll have more than enough left over for patching it up and it'll be super easy to do.
     
  11. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    The wheel wells were mounted using 3/4" #10 pan head screws with 3/16" fender washers. They're certainly much more sturdy than they were with the factory staples.

    A bead of 1" butyl tape was applied the ends and inside "tabs" that contact the underside of the floor. As I said in the post above, the underside of the floor and camper frame surfaces inside the wheel wells were painted with black exterior latex primer (on the wood) and rust paint on the metal prior to spraying them all with rock guard.

    Judging by the butyl that squeezed out along the edges, it certainly looks like I've got a good seal that should keep out water and dust.

    [​IMG]

    The cusionstep vinyl flooring was "cut in" and "reverse rolled" to help remove the curls picked up from being tightly rolled. I'll lay it out flat tonight and leave it sit for a day just so that it stays flat when the glue is applied.

    I don't want any moisture to work it's way under the edges of the OSB floor so the white PVC (outside corner) trim (that secures the bottom edges of the camper's outer skin) has been crown stapled (5/8" staples) and silicone was applied to the joint where the inside corner tab slides between the underside of the OSB floor and the camper frame.

    With the edges of the floor screwed down at 16" O/C, the PVC trim is effectively "pinned" in place and a bead of silicone was applied along the trim's bottom edge where it meets the camper frame.

    I've also run a bead of silicone into the joint between the underside of the floor and frame where it overhangs at the front and back of the camper. While they will be hidden by 3/4" aluminum angle (which I'll use to pin up the bottom edges of the front and rear outer skins), this should to help protect the edges of the OSB floor from any exposure to rain or road spray.
     
  12. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    The guy at the flooring store was concerned with the OSB surface showing through and I've reconsidered the "loose lay" option versus a "full spread" of flooring adhesive. Considering that much of the floor is hidden and that the manufacturer uses the "full spread" when they glue down their flooring, I might as well follow suit and glue it down so that the flooring doesn't buckle or shrink as the outside temperature changes.

    Not sure I can get to the flooring store in time but I'll try to pick up some adhesive after work tonight.

    Once the flooring is down, I'll be able to screw down the walls to the floor and frame and drill all of the holes I need in the floor without the vinyl buckling, moving or doing anything weird.

    Meanwhile, I've already picked up a few 2"x4" and 2"x6" studs that I'll start ripping down to the 1"x1-1/2"x 8' framing boards that I'll need to rebuild and repair the walls this weekend.

    I've been looking around for three or four sheets of vinyl covered luan paneling and managed to find a few colours at Windsor Plywood. I've narrowed it down to two choices that compliment the flooring and that I can live with but I'll keep poking around and see if one of the other Windsor Plywood locations might have anything different.

    Home Depot, Revy and McDiarmid Lumber didn't seem to carry anything other than HDF (High Density Fiberboard) panelling which is markedly heavier, more flexible and, unless it's glued down, tends to sag like crazy, especially if it's exposed to moisture.

    The DW reminded me that the walls are almost completely hidden anyway, but I'm a detail oriented person and spiffy new luan is only $20-$25 a sheet. Given that the new flooring is much darker than the original flooring was, I want to brighten things up as much as I can.

    I'll have to patch them up but the simulated wood grain cabinets and counter tops aren't getting a facelift, at least not this year. The DW and I agree that the wood grain will make for a nice contrast between the original fabrics, the new walls and floor.

    At this point, looking at all the staples used to hold the wall framing together, I'm wondering it it wouldn't just be faster, easier and more efficient to build new walls from scratch. Man, those guys go nuts with the staples! While I have several areas that definitely need replacing and a few spots that could use some additional strength, I don't want to reinvent the wheel here! [;)]
     
  13. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    Made it just in time to pick up the flooring adhesive and a 1/16"x1/16"x1/16" glue trowel and had a busy evening lined up before I could set to work on the pup.

    [​IMG]

    I rolled up the vinyl and began spreading the glue evenly across the rearmost 3 feet of the deck. Once applied, the glue needed about 45 minutes to become tacky (set up) and ready for the vinyl. (I wish I had started this before 10:00pm as doing so meant I'd be up late.)

    I laid down the vinyl across the section I'd spread adhesive on, spread out the air bubbles and walked it to make sure it would stay put while I rolled up the remaining 8 feet and troweled out the adhesive across the rest of the floor. It was a little humid and cool in the garage so I plugged in a heater and went back in the house while the adhesive set up.

    Again, I laid down the remaining vinyl working slowly to "push" the vinyl down as it rolled out. Working slowly from the center of the floor I the flat of my hands to "wipe" the vinyl into place alternating from the center to either side as I rolled the vinyl forward.

    Without a 100 LB roller, I "walked it out" using small steps from side to side and front to back until I'd covered the entire floor. Once completed, it became apparent that a few screw heads had somewhat evaded my efforts to conceal them with floor patch but it's not a problem as they'll all be hidden behind cabinetry anyway. Now that it's done, I've got one small "air bubble" (more likely a wood chip or piece of debris) that's easily fixed using a piece of plywood and a few bricks to weigh it down.

    All in all, the I'm quite pleased with the new floor. It's much more dark than the original vinyl (note the sample in the upper right corner in the previous image) but it matches the fabrics perfectly, is much more durable and, true to the manufacturer's claims, it's actually a bit softer to walk on.

    [​IMG]

    It was a short night and an early morning and I'm draggin' my butt today. I will put the wheels back on but we'll be busy and I don't plan on getting much more than that done tonight.
     
  14. papachaz

    papachaz New Member

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    Jun 26, 2011
    looking great dubbya! i had a 96 coachmen that had the same problems. that angle iron frame inside the wall rear of the door was there on mine too when i took the metal off to look at it. i'd assume it's a factory thing that is supposed to strengthen the wall, but it doesn't last the way they put them together.

    you are doing a great job expaining and documenting as you go, this thread will be utilized a LOT in the future, you're helping a lot of people here for sure, great job, and thank you!
     
  15. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    Re: 1997 Viking 2060ST rebuild (framing the walls)

    Thankfully, the DW was gracious enough to help with the yard work so that I could get something done on the camper.

    To get started, I picked up a four 2x4's and a pair of 2x6's last week and used a table saw to rip them down to the 1-1/2" x 1" and 1-1/2" x 2" framing members I'd need to begin reconstruction of the walls.

    [​IMG]

    I knew right away I'd need more lumber but, given the time I had available to work on it, this was more than enough to get me through the weekend.

    In the initial construction, the 2"x6" boards were pretty much a waste of lumber as they didn't actually make any contact with the camper's frame. They were suspended by staples to the ends of the original 1-1/2"x1" wall framing.

    I used the old walls as templates but made a few changes by making the new 2"x6" fender supports several inches longer. Instead of simply holding the shape of the fenders, the longer boards significantly increase the vertical strength of the walls since they're now long enough to reach the frame on either end of the wheel wells.

    In addition, I added a new piece of wood atop the rearmost vertical member of the front storage compartment hatches. Fastened to the 2"x1-1/2" corner post at the front of each wall, this piece provides additional support to the angled top edge boards of the storage compartment where they fasten to the 1-1-2"x2" posts.

    I can see the purpose behind using 2" staples as they are a lot faster than screwing and gluing, plus the individual members tend to remain a little more forgiving and "adjustable" while you're building. While staples do provide sufficient "end-to-end" strength, we've all seen how these things work loose over time.

    As I worked to add support for the plywood pieces (electrical hatches, stove mount, etc.), it occurred to me that I needed a better method to fasten plywood to the wall framing, something that would be light and still provide a sturdy mounting surface for a fold out table or anything else I want to fasten to the wall's exterior.

    [​IMG]

    I think some hammer-in truss plate cut to size would do the trick nicely. Additionally, while I do intend to line the front storage compartment with 1/2" plywood, the joints in front ends (of the side walls where all the fancy angles are) would definitely benefit from increased support as well.

    I've used this stuff before and it's a bit of a pain. While a hammer works, it'd sure be nice to have a press that could punch it on in one fell swoop without obliterating the wood. Well, I'll try to figure something out.
     
  16. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    1997 Viking 2060ST rebuild (Need Cheap Steel Pulleys? Read This!)

    I've been looking for an inexpensive and more sturdy solution to replacing the nylon lift system pulleys on the L&W lift system in my '97 Viking.

    While I have no choice but to replace one of the floor/wall mount double pulleys (and bracket), I simply can't see paying $38+shipping, especially when the other pulleys could stand being replaced as well. I did find a vendor on eBay selling a "16 pulley kit" for Jayco & Viking campers but he was asking $160 + shipping just for the pulleys. Better but not good enough.

    I've patiently continued my search until today when, while strolling through The Home Depot, I found that the 1"x 1/4" rollers I need are sold in pairs as a Sliding Patio Door tension rollers.

    [​IMG]

    Prime Line Products
    Sliding screen door tension roller
    Steel ball bearing (1")
    Qty: 2ea.
    PL Part#: B-522
    UPC Code: 49793 00522

    The rollers are riveted to a easily removed housing attached to a spring clip. Just drill out the axle rivet and you're good to go. Cost for two rollers? $6.77 ($3.39 each!) + tax. A very fair price and still a far cry from what these pulleys are selling for elsewhere!

    These rollers should work just fine to replace the original nylon pulleys with a minimum of work. They have steel ball bearings so they won't wear out quickly, bend or warp under stress and they'll accommodate 3/32" or 1/8" lift cables. All I need now are the "axle" nuts and bolts to mount them with. I'll use some flat stock to make the double pulley bracket I need and just bolt it all together when it's done.

    There is another part number for a 1" pulley but it's 5/16" thick, and I was concerned that it's just a tad too thick to fit within the confines of the stock double pulley housings.

    Here's a link to the manufacturer's site where you can find any size(s) you need in steel, stainless, nylon, nylon/steel, with or without bearings. Just select the size and width you need from the menu on the left of the manufacturer's page to find the item you need.

    http://www.prime-line-products.com/home4.wcs?nMenuid=350&cProd=D&cSProd=001

    Though they are hard to find and not all of the individual sizes nor the assemblies are listed online at Home Depot (Lowes has them too) or Amazon.com. I'd definitely recommend going to the store in person. If you go to the store and they don't have them in stock, you may be able to order them in at the Customer Service desk.
     
  17. RonJ

    RonJ Member

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    Aug 12, 2011
    Dubbya
    Finally took the time to read thru your rebuild project and I'm impressed. Your thorough research, excellent narrative description of each step and abundant pictures will surely make it much easier for others contemplating a rebuild project. Wish I had read it before I started mine. Looking forward to following the completion of your project.
     
  18. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    Thanks RonJ!

    If you've got the time and patience, sometimes it's best not to move too quickly with these things. Just waiting a day or two and keeping your eyes open before making a purchase can save a few bucks, especially on tools!

    I was looking for some 30" Quick Bar (ratcheting) clamps on Thursday last week. Home Depot and a few others wanted about $34 a piece. I've been keeping a close eye on the budget so I just couldn't bring myself to spend the cash on a tool I'd seldom ever use.

    Saturday morning, I when to Canadian Tire and found their knockoff "Jobmate" 30" Quick clamps on sale for $11.99 ea. Score! Of course they're not the same quality as the Irwin brand but they still work slicker than chicken snot and wish I'd bought them sooner. They're almost like having another set of arms!
     
  19. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    1997 Viking 2060ST rebuild (Framing the walls continued)

    Well, I had a ton of help from the DW this long weekend and, despite the time I lent to a few of her projects, was able to make some progress in framing the walls and front bulkhead.

    In my last progress post, I'd roughed in the curbside front wall section and with a duplicate "nose" section for the driver side wall.

    Since then, I've finished framing the curbside section and added some extra 1/2" standard plywood flush to the exterior wall. This will give me a more solid backing to which I can attach any accessories.

    You'll note that I replaced any double 1"x1-1/2" posts with 2x3's and that I've used hammer in mending plates to most of the major joints. Every stick is glued (with Gorilla wood glue) and screwed it together using ceramic deck screws. Admittedly, it's leaning on "over-engineered" but it doesn't really add that much weight and this thing is rock solid now and I know I won't have to worry about it falling apart in a couple of years.

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    I plan to use extruded aluminum rail by Patrick Industries to attach an exterior table. I nice low-dough solution for a quick and easy table. It runs about $5 (plus shipping) for 30".
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    I've also completed the rear curbside wall section and re-used the original steel inner frame (now properly screwed in place BTW!) with some more substantial framing to support the extended rear bunk. I'm pretty confident it'll hold a couple of adults without too much trouble. I've also added another sheet of tin (20 gauge galvanized heating duct cut into 5" X 16" strips) to the inside of each post cutout.

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    Funny thing here is that my DD looked at the new rear corner sections and immediately compared them to the old framing. She couldn't believe I'd let her sleep on it knowing it wasn't safe!!! [LOL] Hah! it was still pretty safe, but even a 13 y/o kid can tell the difference in the new construction.

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  20. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    6,138
    38
    Aug 2, 2011
    Steinbach, MB
    Here's the inside view of the curbside front wall section showing the framing details a little more clearly.

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    Here's the driver side wall section framing as seen from the interior. I've still got to attach the rear corner and add mending plates to the remainder of the major joints.

    The front upper section of 1/2" plywood is backed with 3/4" plywood, glued and screwed in place to 1"x 1-1/2" members. This will provide increased rigidity for the clasps that secure the lowered roof in place as well as the outdoor stove at the front end of the curbside wall.

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    A close-up of the driver side wall openings for the fridge and furnace, including the furnace exhaust. The cross piece in the middle of the opening was changed to better accommodate the screws that will hold the vents in place.

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    And here's the new front bulkhead. I've replaced the original 3/4"x 1-1/2" framing with 1"x1-1/2" framing. Again, the whole thing was clamped, glued and screwed. No hammer in plates here though, the 1/2" plywood should be more than enough to hold this squarely together.

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    I've changed the sill detail on this so that it's a little more sturdy. It'll now stick out 1/2" into the storage compartment but be hidden when I cover it with 1/2" plywood. That should make it a little more sturdy and capable of taking a beating than the original 1/8" luan ever did.
     

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