1997 Viking 2060ST rebuild (floor, front compartment)

Discussion in 'Camper Restoration Projects' started by Dubbya, Apr 5, 2012.

  1. shelmily

    shelmily Well-Known Member

    3,166
    181
    Jun 7, 2012
    Northeast Pennsylvania
    Awesome job for sure Dubbya. You should sure be proud of it. I hope you get to enjoy it as much as you have put into it.

    I have a '94 Rockwood 1910, and our campers are identical except for the lift system and the rear bench. Which by the way I would love to add to mine. I especially like the shoe storage you have added. I have twin 8 yr old daughters, and the flip flops are everywhere.

    I think I have some work to do. :)
     
  2. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    6,125
    44
    Aug 2, 2011
    Steinbach, MB
    LOL.. Thanks, Shelmily!

    Yep, those flipflops will getcha every time! Walking around in the pup is like trying to navigate a minefield some mornings.
     
  3. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    6,125
    44
    Aug 2, 2011
    Steinbach, MB
    I've cut my outdoor table at 30"x18 3/4" out of a scrap piece of GIS 3/4" maple plywood, then traced around a serving plate to round off the left front corner so that the door will open a little wider and so that walking by it won't cause anyone to hook onto it accidentally. If the door won't open wide enough or if it's just too long, I may trim off a little more at a 45 degree angle or just cut it back to 24" in length but for now, we'll try it out and see how well this works.

    I sanded the surfaces and edges with 220 grit paper on a sanding block then treated it with Minwax wood conditioner. The wood conditioner is designed to facilitate smooth even staining but it also seals the wood and makes it much less absorbent when painting. One application dries to touch in under 15 minutes, completely in about 2 hours. I waited until it was good and dry. I wouldn't run out and buy it for this project but I used it on other project and still had some kicking around.

    [​IMG]

    After that, I used Krylon H20 primer/sealer (white), let it dry for 1/2 hour then sanded it and touched up any areas that needed it. It does tend to "orange peel" if you spray it on too thick but it's easily sanded smooth as glass with 220 grit sand paper.

    [​IMG]

    After a few touchups and more sanding, I had it smooth as glass then shot it with a rattle can of white Krylon "Outdoor Spaces" paint . I think it's just a marketing ploy and that it's the same as their interior/exterior wood/metal paint but it says it's great for outdoor furniture and wicker, so I gave it a try.

    I used a whole can of primer and a whole can of paint. Truth be told, I'd like to give it another coat but I'll live with this for now and see how it holds up to weathering. If it needs another coat, I'll likely just hit with some more sand paper then spray it.

    As with any other white paint, you do need a lot of light to be able to spray it on evenly but it does "self level" to a great extent and really leaves a nice smooth finish, similar to the white vinyl covered MDF shelving you'd buy at a hardware store.

    [​IMG]

    I'm really not impressed with the coverage of Krylon paints but I've used it before and was pretty much expecting I'd run out. The can says it'll cover 25 square feet but that's a bold faced lie. I gave it two good coats and ran out of paint before I was done a third (4 sq ft x 3 = 12 sq ft). For cryin' out loud, I'd already primed it! It's great paint, perfect for this application, but if you decide to use it, you might want to buy more than you think you'll need.

    Well, it is what it is at this point. If it doesn't work out, I can always go and get a custom counter top made out of some weather resistant material.

    I've already installed the 13" shelf verticals on the side of the camper beside the stove, so all that remains to be done is to attach the 16" shelf brackets to the underside of the counter top. I'll get that done this evening before we head out for the weekend and post the photos on Monday.
     
  4. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    6,125
    44
    Aug 2, 2011
    Steinbach, MB
    The 16" shelf brackets are attached to the underside of the shelf/counter

    [​IMG]

    These are the 13" shelving verticals where the shelf will be located beside the outdoor stove.

    [​IMG]

    And here's the shelf set in place.

    [​IMG]

    And in use at the campsite this past weekend.

    [​IMG]

    Looks like I'll have to trim an inch off the length so that the counter can be stored in the rear bench. I'll also notch out the counter for the verticals so that it's flush with the side of the camper and the front of the stove.

    So, the final dimensions will be 29"x 18 3/4". BTW, the DW loves the extra counter space.

    In addition, we took the pup's table outside for dinner on Saturday night and loved it. We've since decided to build another shelf that extends out between 48" and 60". It'll mount to the verticals on the camper and I'll pick up an adjustable folding table leg for the front end.

    Sitting under the awning in lawn chairs with a table to put drinks and snacks on sure will be handy. With an adjustable table leg, we'll also be able to use it as a stand up bar or extended counter for serving meals on.

    More to come...
     
    Earthfairies likes this.
  5. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    6,125
    44
    Aug 2, 2011
    Steinbach, MB
    I managed to get the outdoor counter trimmed to 28-1/2" long so it fits in the rear storage bench and I notched it out around the shelf verticals so that it sits closer to the wall of the pup and flush to the front of the outdoor stove.

    In addition, I spent a few hours converting the 1/2" sink drain to 1-1/2" using ABS pipe fittings, a waste overflow kit and a 1-1/2" sump pump drainage hose kit.

    If you're interested, I've created a mod detailing exactly how I did it. There are several large photos, assembly diagrams and a drain testing video as well.

    Check out the mod here:
    http://www.popupportal.com/index.php?topic=61205.0
     
  6. BigBaron

    BigBaron Dreaming of Tommy's chili cheeseburgers...

    4,583
    8
    Jun 21, 2012
    I can't wait to get the time to go through every step of your repairs.

    Any tips on lifting the ENTIRE trailer off of the frame in one piece?

    My trailer is sound, just has bad rust on the frame.
     
  7. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    6,125
    44
    Aug 2, 2011
    Steinbach, MB
    Lifting the walls off the frame would be a great time saver and, believe me, I sure thought about it but quickly realized there was so much damage that I might as well just rebuild them.

    The whole body is quite sturdy until you remove the outer skin to access the screws/bolts that secure the walls to the frame. That's when things get a little dicey.

    You'll never get the floor off without tearing it apart since it's screwed down under the flooring but the walls could certainly come off in one piece.

    It takes two men just to carry the roof, so I'd recommend that you remove it. It's only a few bolts and wire anyway but the extra weight would make things infinitely more difficult.

    If you're set on lifting the assembled walls, I'd suggest that you might want to take out the door and door frame as it'll inevitably break as you move the walls around. You might even secure the corners by fastening pieces of plywood to the tops of each wall section and to the cavity between the two wall sections (front and back on either end of the door frame) so that the walls can't buckle, twist or move around while you're moving the body

    Just remember to pre-drill any holes as screws tend to split the dry old wood pretty easily!

    If you've removed the screws/bolts holding the walls to the floor, you should be able to lift the corners enough to get a few 8 foot 2x6's under them (crosswise from side to side). I'd say three (one at either end and one one in the middle) would be enough to do it.

    It's going to be more awkward than heavy, but four to six able-bodied men should be able to do it without too much trouble. I think you'd do well to find some square-dance partners! [LOL]

    You'll need some space but I wouldn't put the whole thing right on the ground as you'll have to pick it back up at some point. Maybe lay down a few 2x6's lengthwise just to keep it high enough off the ground so you can get your fingers under the 2x6's you carried the body with when you need to.

    Once it's on the ground, you can put the roof back on if you need to. Just set it in place and latch it to the walls. It won't blow away. My roof sat uncovered on 2x6's outside on the driveway for 3 months and didn't budge an inch, didn't attract any beasties or bugs either! Just sayin' but if you're putting the walls out there, you might want to tarp the whole thing.

    Let me know how it goes for ya!
     
  8. BigBaron

    BigBaron Dreaming of Tommy's chili cheeseburgers...

    4,583
    8
    Jun 21, 2012
    Decided just to treat and paint the visible rust and not put any more time and money into our old trailer.

    I love your work!

    I'm going to add cross-braces (the way you did it) to our new trailer when we get it.
     
  9. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    6,125
    44
    Aug 2, 2011
    Steinbach, MB
    Baron, I'm really glad I did it and I think you'd like the added support in the floor. It sure is nice not to feel it flex and bow under your weight when you walk on it.
     
  10. BigBaron

    BigBaron Dreaming of Tommy's chili cheeseburgers...

    4,583
    8
    Jun 21, 2012
    I was amazed when I saw the frame design on the 2011 Coachmen Clippers that were imported into Korea. They have almost no cross braces at all!
    I'll post pics. My wife even agrees we'll need to do it!
     
  11. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    6,125
    44
    Aug 2, 2011
    Steinbach, MB
    In a video I saw the other day, the manufacturer (I forget which one) was gluing and screwing down the floors to the frames. I haven't given it much thought or taken the time to verify it but if that's the case, they'd likely be able to do away with the additional bracing and reduce the curb weight.
     
  12. BigBaron

    BigBaron Dreaming of Tommy's chili cheeseburgers...

    4,583
    8
    Jun 21, 2012
    I'll post pics when I get it. Do you have any higher resolution pics of your trailer? Those little ones don't do it justice.
     
  13. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    6,125
    44
    Aug 2, 2011
    Steinbach, MB
    If you click on the thumbnails, they'll open up the 800x600 images.
     
  14. sinister

    sinister New Member

    46
    0
    Dec 29, 2012
    I've been reading through your rebuild and saving several pics and words for reference when i do my rebuild.
    One question...did this really take 3 months to do?
     
  15. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    6,125
    44
    Aug 2, 2011
    Steinbach, MB
    If you work a full time job, you're actively participating in raising a family, and you're doing it in your spare time, I'd say it would take that long.

    If you've got three to four weeks free of distractions and interruptions, you should be able to get most, if not all of it done.
     
  16. sinister

    sinister New Member

    46
    0
    Dec 29, 2012
    That's good to hear, i looked at your posting dates and was surprised it only took 3 months. You did a lot of work to it.
    Now that i read my previous post it sounds like i thought 3 months was a long time, my bad.

    So i might have mine done by mid summer :). Thanks for the encouragement!
     
  17. BigBaron

    BigBaron Dreaming of Tommy's chili cheeseburgers...

    4,583
    8
    Jun 21, 2012

    Update: After our first four-day trip, I can clearly identify where the frame members are and aren't! [:(!] Those additional cross braces are moving up the to-do list!


    There are many spots where the factory completely missed the frame when attaching the floor, like this one; [:(!]


    [​IMG]
     
  18. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    6,125
    44
    Aug 2, 2011
    Steinbach, MB
    Yeah... looks like the screw gun operator had a real eye for detail! [;)]

    I know it happens sometimes as you're essentially eyeballing a screw line. The thing is, when you've run a screw gun for any period of time, you can tell you've missed the beam. It's easily fixed by simply adjusting putting another screw beside it. If they simply ignored the fact that they missed the beam entirely, that's poor workmanship and you've actually got a warranty claim.

    Being that you're in Korea, getting it fixed properly under warranty might be a bit of a challenge! Nonetheless, it might be worth mentioning to the dealer and/or manufacturer. They might blow it off but then again, they might not. Fixing it properly means removing the vinyl flooring or punching some screw holes through it before removing/replacing it. Either way, you'll never get the vinyl out without destroying it. Then again, maybe they'll reimburse you for materials and labor. Who knows?
     
  19. BigBaron

    BigBaron Dreaming of Tommy's chili cheeseburgers...

    4,583
    8
    Jun 21, 2012
    Per their warranty, if the trailer isn't registered and used in North America, there is no warranty.


    Those aren't screws. They're nails!


    [​IMG]
     
  20. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    6,125
    44
    Aug 2, 2011
    Steinbach, MB
    NAILS? They used NAILS? Wow.. *scratches head* ... Well, there's nothing you can do about the warranty but even so, I mean really, that's just shoddy workmanship. The fact that they put nails in it simply tells you they knew they'd screwed up but didn't care enough to fix it properly. Wow...

    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page