2004 Fleetwood Tacoma - Makeover

Discussion in 'Checkout My Rig !' started by Johncn42, Aug 23, 2017.

  1. Johncn42

    Johncn42 New Member

    10
    7
    Aug 23, 2017
    Cape Canaveral, FL
    Hey folks,

    New here, new to PUP campers, although we've had larger tow behind toy haulers in the past. We got a CL 2004 Tacoma a few weeks ago, and have started a "makeover" type project.

    Is this the best forum to post an ongoing thread for the project, and is there interest in that sort of thing? We have benefited from various threads on these forums in our search for a camper and would like to contribute back to the online community. Plus, we are not very DIY folks, so will undoubtedly want to pick the collective brains of the members...lol.

    Here are a couple of pics of the Tacoma after we towed her across Florida to part we live in, and did our initial wash.

    Regards,

    Johncn

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Sjm9911, Rik Peery and Mamie like this.
  2. JPBar

    JPBar Well-Known Member

    1,852
    554
    Sep 22, 2016
    Texas
    Welcome from Texas, camper looks to be in great shape. Congrats!
     
  3. GreatBigAbyss

    GreatBigAbyss Active Member

    190
    114
    Apr 12, 2017
    Manitoba
    Nice. You'd better be pulling it with a Toyota Tacoma. Just 'cause.
     
    Rik Peery likes this.
  4. Johncn42

    Johncn42 New Member

    10
    7
    Aug 23, 2017
    Cape Canaveral, FL
    Thanks, guys. Pulling with our Ford F-250 Super Duty. Can you say "overkill"? ;-) Always like the Tacoma trucks, though.

    It seems like it is in good basic shape, and only got limited use. The underside is very, very clean, except for one small spot of slightly darkened / softened (?) wood in the corner of the one bunk end...about the size of a quarter of a sheet of printer paper. Don't see any signs we recognize of roof leaking or staining. Interior was in really good shape, overall, when we got it.

    Since taking those two pictures, we've cleaned the canvas of some small areas of mildew stains in the bunk ends, re-waterproofed the Sunbrella with 303, removed all the cushions and mattresses to be freshened up and/or reupholstered, taken off the cabinet faces and repainted everything, replaced all the original cabinet hardware and reassembled the cabinets. We are flooring it today with "floating" vinyl planks. We discovered the fresh water intake hose was cracked at the bend, so have the replacement here and ready to install, too.

    The upholstery work is a separate project in itself, as we had never done anything like that. My wife had sewing in Home Economics in high school, and that was about it. Her last sewing project was a baby quilt while pregnant with our son...who is now in his mid-20s...and she never finished it...lol. We are now on our second thrift shop sewing machine for this project. The first one had nylon gears that disintegrated on day two! The new thrift shop machine is a 1951 Singer with all metal construction, and it took several days delay to get that cleaned, lubricated and functional.

    However, did get the dinette seat "bottom" cushions (with the wood inserts) done yesterday. Making slow but steady progress. She added hidden zippers to make removal easier. The completed cushions look a bit too large on purpose, as she made them slightly larger to accommodate extra batting to add around closed cell foam original. She also made the "piping" out of canvas duck scraps twisted into "cord" with a kitchen hand mixer, and you can see some of it in the foreground of the picture below.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Regards,

    Johncn
     
  5. Johncn42

    Johncn42 New Member

    10
    7
    Aug 23, 2017
    Cape Canaveral, FL
    Hello,

    Well, our Tacoma makeover project got interrupted last August and September by a tropical event, so we stopped updating this thread. We did not stop working on the rig, however, and have used the "finished" (to the extent any mods or makeover are ever finished) pop up several times so far. We have another trip planned soon, and I figure I better get this updated now before another tropical system comes...lol.

    Here is a brief summary of what we did, and a handful of the in-process pics. If there is an actual interest in more detail, let me know, and I will post more of the "how to" steps we went through. Remember that our goal was to "glamp" this Tacoma up with a "Beach Shack" theme.

    1) Prepped and painted all the cabinets and walls - white and blue

    2) Replaced all hardware on cabinets, and added "sea glass" knobs

    3) Replaced rolled linoleum floor with vinyl plank "wood look" flooring

    4) Made the second of the two king sized bunks into a flexible space - put matching vinyl plank flooring in, and use as sitting / meditation / exercise area OR as additional sleeping if we have company. Makes it much "roomier" when there are only two of us 99% of the time.

    5) Replaced faucet in sink with nicer, quickly removable one for folding closed

    6) Reupholstered all the cushions - this was a major project, but very educational for my wife!

    7) Redid all the curtains by keeping blackout cloth, but covering with another fabric...then creating sheers

    8) Created nautical themed storage space bench seats / wooden covers with rope handles

    9) Added a hidden head compartment that is only used overnight to save trips to the bathrooms

    10) Purchased an awesome two-part, self-contained, regular height unit that comes apart to hide under seats during the day

    11) Cleaned the canvas and re-waterproofed everything...recaulked corner caps on roof for good measure

    12) Prepped and painted original dinette table as a water / beach interface "Acrylic flow" painting. Put clear epoxy "bar top" finish on it to make it waterproof and more "liquid" looking

    13) Redid the one damaged counter top by the door with a homemade sand and shell mixture (from our local beach), and then covered that with a clear epoxy resin coating to make a waterproof counter

    14) Created new mattress covers and updated bedding with memory foam topper

    15) Added ice maker and microwave

    Here are some pics of the Beach Shack:

    [​IMG]

    View looking from our bed toward front of rig:

    [​IMG]

    Another view from same spot sitting on bunk:

    [​IMG]

    Close up of dinette table acrylic flow painting and cushions, drapes:

    [​IMG]

    The sand / shell counter top as you enter:

    [​IMG]

    The sand and glue mixture in process on balcony. Sand is from the beach in background:

    [​IMG]

    The bench tops we made with "nautical" rope handles:

    [​IMG]

    The end where the hidden head is located:

    [​IMG]

    The Thetford 550E Curve electric flush toilet (#92360: $126-ish on Amazon):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The one bunk end with installed vinyl plank flooring:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Well, that is a quick wrap up. Hope this helps someone doing work on their own camper at some point. Let us know if anyone has questions about process or materials. Next trip is scalloping in west Florida, and then down to the Keys again after that...

    Johncn
     
    jnc and Rik Peery like this.
  6. Rik Peery

    Rik Peery Active Member

    389
    221
    Jun 15, 2018
    Virginia
    Daggone dude, outstanding! I'd hang out in Florida, but the in laws beat us down there lol
     
  7. Trendy

    Trendy New Member

    1
    0
    Aug 23, 2018
    I absolutely love your makeover and am much encouraged that if Hubby finds a pop up that is basically sound yet the interior looks worn I can revamp it like you two did yours! ( : I SO love the table, oh my gosh how do you do that? Spill paint and let it drip down, carefully ? You did a great job and have something to be proud of there.
     
  8. Balthisar

    Balthisar Active Member

    104
    55
    Jun 26, 2018
    Plymouth, MI USA
    Beautiful. I especially love what you did with the extra bunk, since we only use it as storage. The sea-shell countertop, though, did you level it off with epoxy? Is all that stuff sticking out?
     
  9. Johncn42

    Johncn42 New Member

    10
    7
    Aug 23, 2017
    Cape Canaveral, FL
    Thanks so much for the kind words.

    Anybody who knows us would tell you that if we can do a makeover, ANYONE can do a makeover...lol. We are not "handy" people. We just used Google and YouTube (and other sources), and were prepared to be patient enough to learn a few new tricks. There are some very skilled, OCD, detail-oriented people posting "how to" videos these days on all sorts of projects. These seem to me to make what would have been impossible for clueless klutzes like to even attempt five or ten years ago just a matter of doing some research, taking your time, and not fearing failure.

    For the table and counter tops, we started out thinking of using a Rustoleum product called "Countertop Transformations". It is supposed to make formica / old particle board counters look like marble or stone. But, while researching it, we realized that many people redoing counter tops were using a top layer of expoxy anyway, and saw some really cool projects using non-traditional surfaces (bottle tops, coasters, driftwood, pallets, baseball cards, etc.) with a sealant layer to even it out. This gave us the idea of using a painting to look like the beach / sea interface, and cover it with epoxy. The table top was damaged anyway, so painting over it and fixing the gouges would hide that. And we liked the "wet" look of shiny bar top epoxy projects.

    We searched for art showing water / land interface and beach contours, and saw some really neat abstract paintings using an "acrylic flow" painting techniques to produce "cells" by using the naturally different weights of the paint pigments with a product that allows mixing to create abstract patterns. This is sometimes called a "pour" technique. It uses liquid silicone (sewing machine lube), cheap acrylic paints from Michael's, some paint condition from Home Depot, and some Dixie cups and popsicle sticks and a spatula. ;-) This is usually done on canvas, but CAN be done on nearly any surface...if you prep it for painting. We sanded the table top and used "gesso" (like a primer for artistic painting) to get it ready.

    This is an overview shot of what we used to do the table top painting. The surface is done flat (horizontal). Use big sheets of painter's plastic, as you will make a mess. Note the use of a kitchen scale to get ratios of paints to water and "paint conditioner" product (Floetrol) correct. The sewing machine lube is just a few drops for each dixie cup.
    [​IMG]

    Here are some of the best basic links:

    Caren Goodrich - She rocks....very easy to follow, well done how to videos on acrylic pour techniques
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCymAYoGAIKclQEDmDl_1h8w

    This particular video of hers was influential in our thinking:


    Here is a basic "recipe" for making acrylic flow projects:
    https://acrylicpouring.com/acrylic-pouring-floetrol-recipe-included/

    We tried this out on cheap canvases to get some basic skills / a working recipe together, and then tried it on some thrift shop table tops to get an idea if it would work. It did.

    After covering our condo balcony in sheets of plastic, we did the table and let it dry for a week or so. Then did an epoxy coating to preserve it once we decided we like the results.

    I can post another thread specifically on the process we used for the table if there is interest. It is not hard. It does require some patience, and understanding that you WILL make a mess, and your first few tries may not look so great...lol. We have discovered we LIKE to do these projects, and have since then started doing a few surrealistic paintings each time we camp. Our daughter has also learned, and done a few paintings. It's actually pretty fun to do. ;-)

    JohnCn
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2018
  10. Johncn42

    Johncn42 New Member

    10
    7
    Aug 23, 2017
    Cape Canaveral, FL
    Thanks for comments. We like it with the flooring, and can still use the other king mattress there if we get visitors, as nothing really changed other than the surface, and the increased weight of the slide out. We are very careful not to stress the rollers or slide components, as the flooring does add some weight / stress on the components. No issues so far, and we always lift up on the bunk from underneath as we pull it out to secure the support posts to the camper itself.

    Good eye on the counter top! It was damaged: a bit of water warping on one end, one main gouge, and the plastic edging was coming off. And, yes, that pic is BEFORE we put the epoxy coating on it, and the shells and so on were sticking up. We then coated it with a couple layers of epoxy. It is not completely level now, but is much closer. We could have kept adding epoxy layers in small batches to make it level, or could have created a rim around the edge to make it level on the first pour...but wanted the rounded edges to look "wet", too. We decided "mostly level" was good enough. I will post up a picture of the epoxy process finished product and post to this thread. It's not handy at the moment.

    The method for the sand and shells was, basically, clear school glue (sold in gallon jugs at Michael's...generic brand), mixed in sand from our beach with the glue in a five gallon bucket into a "slurry". Pour the beach sand through a kitchen sifter to get all the "organics" out....these will cause problems with the epoxy coating if not removed! Filled the gouge with "plastic wood", and prepped surface by sanding lightly, covering with gesso (artist's primer for canvases). Then, with a cooking spatula we created a fairly even, thick coating of the sand. When it was pretty even and had "run" over the edges well, we added some shells and starfish. Let it dry.

    Then, we covered the top with a "self-leveling" bar top epoxy product at the same time we did the table top we had painted. That process is another topic, and involves a "seal coat" to provide a clean, non-organic surface for the bar top to adhere to. Otherwise, you will get mucho bubbles. Then, a "flood coat" to create the clear coating. We used four (I think) pours of the flood coat to build up coating about 1/8 at a time. There is more to it, of course, but could post the process in another thread if there is interest.

    Here are some low res pics of the "beaching it up" process:

    Countertop after filling the gouge with Plastic Wood, adding a short section of plastic edging I bought on eBay, sanding lightly, and prepping with the white "gesso" to seal it.

    [​IMG]

    The basic supplies...

    [​IMG]

    Sifting out the organics:
    [​IMG]

    Mixing the sand and glue:
    [​IMG]

    Starting the sand layer:
    [​IMG]

    Smearing it on:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Adding the seashells and assorted beachy objects...
    [​IMG]

    The epoxy part is too much to cover here, but this the product we used for the epoxy layers, and they have great tutorial videos that we used. It worked out really well, we thought. But, just can't emphasize that temperature of the air needs to be in a certain range, and the mixing directions are VERY exact, but also very unforgiving. We ruined a couple batches at first. Just start small so you don't waste product while learning, and test your process before doing the "real" project you are attempting to coat.

    http://www.bestbartopepoxy.com/

    Hope this helps,

    Johncn
     
  11. dbhost

    dbhost Member

    99
    22
    Sep 19, 2018
    Wow, talk about a beach house on wheels! Really nice!
     

Share This Page