2010 Coleman Niagara Lift Remote

Discussion in 'Lift Systems' started by jenmek, Apr 17, 2017.

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  1. jenmek

    jenmek New Member

    4
    0
    Feb 25, 2017
    The Woodlands, TX
    Camped this past weekend and while lifting the roof, the cable of my remote got caught in the manual crank shaft. The lift stopped and I soon realized what happened and figured out that by binding up, I may have pulled the wires from within the silver XLR connector. I had to manually crank it up, then down 2 days later.

    I found on a facebook group that I can (should) disconnect the wires of the electric lift to make hand cranking easier. It was also said (but contested) that I could discussed the 12V battery to achieve the same result. My fear came with the roof crashing down if I disconnected the wires (which are taped together). Is my fear unfounded? Also, is the battery method valid?

    Lastly, can I purchase a socket that has the notches already in for use in an electric drill, should this happen again?

    I'm going to try to take the XLR connector apart and resolder the wires to it. If anyone knows of the wiring mapping for this, I'd love to see that too. I found the part online, but just would rather try to fix it myself than pay for a new one. I've enjoyed learning how to work on and fix my pop-up, and I'd love to conquor this!
     
  2. mstrbill

    mstrbill Active Member

    375
    60
    Mar 17, 2013
    Austin , Texas
    Yes, disconnect the wires, this is described in the owner's manual. IMO disconnecting the battery will not do the same thing. Disconecting the wires takes the current limiter out of the circuit, I am guessing that cranking the motor by hand turns it into a generator which causes the circuit limiter to do something.

    I wouldn't do this, just take your time and use the crank. Don't want a chance breaking something in the power lift.
     
  3. kenquagliana

    kenquagliana Member

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    Nov 12, 2013
    Hi there. I have the same camper.
    Ref: Manually Cranking - Unplugging the connector going to the lift motor (as described in the manual) will NOT cause the roof to fall. It WILL allow you to manually crank the system up or down. Disconnecting the battery has no effect on manual operation.
    Ref: Wiring of the XLR connector - I haven't seen a diagram of this yet, but the archives of this forum are very good.....keep searching. If / when I have the same problem, I'd have no issue using jumper wires & clamps and a little patience to figure it out.
    Ref: Using the drill - You'll find that it will require MANY revolutions to raise or lower the roof. So, after actually "feeling" the resistance of the system, the electric drill method would be perfect (IMO). However, as mention earlier, I'd go to hand cranking at the very top or bottom of the operation to avoid over torquing the system.
    Good luck.
     
  4. mstrbill

    mstrbill Active Member

    375
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    Mar 17, 2013
    Austin , Texas
  5. Whizkid

    Whizkid New Member

    12
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    Jun 4, 2016
    Oklahoma
    I disliked the stock remote so much that I took a small aluminum project box from Amazon, a 25' XLR micrphone cable and a SPDT switch and made my own. Works so much better than the stock one. I am going to relocate the connector from the back up to the storage compartment next as the stock location is a pain to get to now that I added a toolbox to the rear bumper.
     
  6. 94-D2

    94-D2 Happy Campin'

    2,272
    80
    May 21, 2010
    Sutter Creek CA
    I have the same lift on my 2011 Avalon. The system has a dynamic brake that stores power similar to a capacitor. It will brake the motor when is experiences the external force of cranking. It can be felt in the crank as resistance. This is a failsafe, yes so the roof will not go out and of control in the event the wiffle tree unwinds and free spools down. Not supposed to happen with a wiffle tree but I had a niagara that did exactly that.

    There was a connector from the limiter to the motor that you pull apart. And correct, removing battery or disconnecting from up front does not discharge the limiter. You have to use up, or interrupt the connection to the motor.

    That said, I use a 5/8" 3/8 drive socket with a slot cut in it to turn the motor with a cordless drill. I use the low speed (high torque) setting when turning it. It doesn't over run the electric lift motor and gets it done. I was thinking to put a standard three wire (wireless) winch relay to operate my lift. The limiter is a simple reversing relay for remote operation, just like a warren winch per se.

    Good luck.
     
  7. kenquagliana

    kenquagliana Member

    53
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    Nov 12, 2013
    Yeah........went camping the weekend after Jenmeck's post and the same thing happened to me! Tried repairing the original remote. No go. The wires were so small I couldn't work with them. Piece of junk overall. So I Just finished building my own remote using Whizkid's approach. Cost me $6 for a project box, a couple of momentary switches and a strain relief gland. I already had an XLR connector and plenty of 22 Gauge stranded wire. Wiring configuration of the female plug on mine is:
    Left Pin - Down
    Center Pin - Hot
    Right Pin - Up
    It's big. It's ugly. But It'll work. And it saved me $85 (plus shipping) to replace it.

    Camper Lift Remote.jpg
     
  8. Whizkid

    Whizkid New Member

    12
    0
    Jun 4, 2016
    Oklahoma
    I like it!
     

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