Boondocking In New England ?

Discussion in 'Boondocking' started by BadLarry, Feb 20, 2013.

  1. BadLarry

    BadLarry New Member

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    Anyone have any spots for boondocking in the New England area ?
     
  2. Unstable_Tripod

    Unstable_Tripod Well, there's your problem!

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    Out here in the West a lot of boondocking occurs in national forests and on BLM land. I don't think you have much of this in New England. You might check with each state to see if they have state forests and if so, if dispersed camping is allowed in them. Check with the big timber companies as well. They might permit dispersed camping in some of their areas. Finally, see if any of the states have SRAs (state recreation areas) or fish and wildlife management areas. Some states allow camping in those and may even have some primitive campsites set up. That's not true boondocking, of course, but it may be as close as you can get.
     
  3. nhcaveman

    nhcaveman Barrington, NH

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    The only thing I know of here in NH is all walk in camping but not really nothing where you could take a camper. VT however has several places scattered throughout the state including some old logging roads and an old abandoned airfield. I have not been to these places and could not tell you where they are but I found them on line someplace, good luck.
     
  4. Ted S.

    Ted S. Member

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    I've researched this topic a number of times and a place called Tripoli Road in the White Mountains keeps coming up. Don't know if this helps, but the page has a number of other "dispersed camping" sites.

    http://icampnh.com/about/tripoli-road/

    Other then that I found one place in the Moosehead Lake Region that looks even more like real boondocking, I bookmarked it and will see if I can find it. It was off a road near a lake.
     
  5. teejaywhy

    teejaywhy Active Member

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    I have no personal experience with New England, but I would start with the National Forests. The term they use for boondocking is "dispersed camping." I would recommend obtaining the "Visitor Map" for the forest(s) you plan to visit. They show all the roads, trails and recreation sites. You might even contact the office and they should be happy to make suggestions.

    http://www.fs.usda.gov/whitemountain

    http://www.fs.usda.gov/greenmountain


    Good luck and happy camping!!
     
  6. peteacher

    peteacher New Member

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    Little Rhody
    Tripoli road in New Hampshire has walk in sites only!
     
  7. jerry_ma

    jerry_ma Member

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    I was in tripoli rd 1 time many years ago. It is walk in but there were a few sites you could shoehorn in a pup.

    Thats the only one I can think of in NH. Only been in campgrounds or state parks in the rest of the New England states.

    Good Luck
    Jerry in MA
     
  8. Unstable_Tripod

    Unstable_Tripod Well, there's your problem!

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    OK, so New Hampshire does have some national forests. That's great because the standard rule in national forests is that you can camp anywhere you want as long as you follow a few rules about distance from watercourses, roads, etc. Call the NF office and ask about dispersed camping. Be sure to tell them you have a large trailer.

    One thing, though, is that you will be extremely limited with a trailer that size because there will be very few places you can get into. Old logging roads are your best bet. Look for landings or truck pullouts (originally used for logging trucks to pass each other). Sometimes a logging, forest or other road runs through a meadow. These can be great places for boondocking. A huge open area like this was the location of our boondocking rally in Arizona last year.

    Also, I see references to "sites" in some of the other posts so I'd like to clear up a point. Forgive me if you (OP) already know this. Some folks think boondocking means camping in a campground without hookups. That's actually dry camping. Boondocking is camping in the wilderness outside of any formal campground. You just find a spot you like in the middle of nowhere and set up. You have nothing except that which you brought along, including water, table, toilet facilities, etc. Of course, the spot you camp on becomes your "site" in one sense but there are no formal sites with a table, fire ring, etc.

    Good luck. Boondocking is a great way to camp.
     
  9. nhcaveman

    nhcaveman Barrington, NH

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    New Hampshire
    UT,

    Whenever I have researched for dispersed camping I keep reading where it seems you should look for previous spots people have camped at rather then creating new one. But then I also understand that you are probably the portals most knowledgeable boon docker.
     
  10. Unstable_Tripod

    Unstable_Tripod Well, there's your problem!

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    Seattle, Washington
    You certainly can use a wilderness spot that someone else used and yes, the NFs like it when you do that because it lessens impact. And, because he is using a fairly large trailer, the odds are that the places he can find to get into will also have been found and "gotten into" by someone else earlier.
     
  11. dfab

    dfab New Member

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    As a teen and 20 something I camped at Tripoli road it was a party spot till they closed the store at the start of the road, went back with my then girl friend and it was quiet. The day we were packing up to head home the girlfriend said the camp site down the road had a big dog it turned out to be a black bear. The sites were not able to take any thing bigger than a small popup , the best sites were down the steep hill next to the river. If I remember correctly the had a dry campground off of Tripoli.
     
  12. BadLarry

    BadLarry New Member

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    Jan 16, 2013
    Ive been to Tripoli, lol. That place is party city for the young at heart. Can always here yelling and screaming in the distance from the drunk kids... There are only a few places to Park a PUP.. at trailheads !
     
  13. BadLarry

    BadLarry New Member

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    Jan 16, 2013
    There is also another place next to tripoli, russell pond - a little to populated for me.. but there are bathrooms w showers,. quarters required
     
  14. rodzilla67

    rodzilla67 New Member

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    Here in Maine there are many sites like this. We frequent a certain area located off of Route 9 in Township 30. Machias River Corridor. They have quite a few sites in this area alone. Free and very beautiful. Most sites are perched on the rivers edge with some lakeside camps as well. Of course its a first come first serve deal. It is not easy to fins information about these type of sites in Maine. I have researched myself and have found that word of mouth is best ;)
     
  15. mainahman

    mainahman All the worlds indeed a stage

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    There is public land up in the stratton Eustis area of Maine on Dead River. Taking the pup boon docking up there this weekend for a fishing trip. Good fishing and a place to park the camper. It is accessible by car, and some lake front on flagstaff that are only accessible by boat. Gorgeous views of the mountains too!
     
  16. BadLarry

    BadLarry New Member

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    Jan 16, 2013
    Sorry it took so long to read the replies. I have been to both Tripoli and Russell Pond.. I know exactly where you are referring to.. Thanks for all the input.
     
  17. 1380ken

    1380ken Well-Known Member

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    I think that there are a few spots on Cherry Mountain Rd off of 302 near Bretton Woods where you could camp with a camper. The road is closed during the winter. I have camped there years ago in a tent. There is a horror show of a private campground at the beginning of the road. The rest of the road is National Forest.
     
  18. aardvark

    aardvark New Member

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    Adirondacks: I know this is an old thread, but the Adirondacks weren't mentioned, and some people may still be googling old threads (like me).

    The Adirondacks (and Catskills for that matter) are not national forests, but the Adirondacks are pretty empty considering they are the size of Vermont and are close to major cities (and just over the border from New England). I have found plenty of spaces where you can boondock there, and last week happened to be at Whitehouse (at the end of a 9-mile dead-end dirt road near Hope, NY that follows a branch of the Sacandaga River), where I once boondocked. They have about 10 semi-campsites along that road, and trails that go for miles from the end of it. There are many other spots like that in the Adirondacks. One advantage of doing this in the Northeast is that water conservation isn't as necessary. You can usually camp near or next to a river or lake, because the Adirondacks are just one lake after the other.

    Vermont: For those looking for spots in Vermont, there are spots along the Arlington/Stratton Road / Kelley Stand Road right next to a steep stream. They closed them after Hurricane Irene clobbered the area (and also clobbered my town, land and river frontage, too ...) and they had to rebuild the road. However, I've been told that these sites are open again (check with the ranger's station first to confirm this). They're really simply pulloffs on a steep dirt road that gets almost no traffic, and it was a fun place to camp the last time I camped there. It is closed in the winter for those considering a winter trip, though. If not, there are free boondocking sites nearby, including Somerset/Forest Road 71 (https://freecampsites.net/#!340&query=sitedetails) and others.

    To say it again, one advantage of boondocking in the Northeast is that access to water is usually not difficult, so you don't have to use wet wipes and hand sanitizer and get dry mouth like those who plan to spend months in the public lands of the West.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018
  19. PaThacker

    PaThacker Well-Known Member

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    Poconos
    Boondocking in PA State Forest on an old logging landing site 5BB03B8D-7802-4BFE-8F96-5710FF6FDD7E.jpeg
     
  20. MsMac

    MsMac Active Member

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    Granted, I lived in New York and New England long before my boondocking adventures began, but I recall seeing, when driving in the mountains, sign after sign saying "posted: no trespassing". How do you make sure that you're not camping on private land? (I have visions of setting up just to have the friendly neighborhood landowner come along and not so kindly request that the site be vacated.)

    Just to clarify- a lot of the public land in the west (especially in the NW) has access to lots of water.
     

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