Can you heat / cool a pop-up effectively?

Discussion in 'Heating / Cooling Systems' started by cv7713, Feb 8, 2010.

  1. gkosel

    gkosel Fargo, ND (Next Trip - ?)

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    My guess is that they will put out about the same amount of heated air. However, a heat strip blowing from a roof mounted AC unit will most likely distribute the heated air better than a ceramic heater. A ceramic combined with the air movement and extra heat from a AC controlled heat strip would be an even more effective combination.

    Just a clarification on propane usage. PUP furnaces do use a lot of propane compared to their water heaters and oven/grills. But, unless you are running your furnace non-stop, you will be able to get through a typical 2-4 night camping trip easily on less than a 20lb bottle of propane especially if you use the Gizmo's and other tips already mentioned in this thread.

    It sounds like the camper that you have or are looking at already has the AC with heat strip so the following comments will be more valuable for others reading this thread that are considering adding an AC unit with heat.

    I added a Carrier Air V 15,000 BTU Heat Pump (standard model) last year and couldn't be more pleased with it. Rather than the 5,000-6,000 BTU heat strips that most units have, this unit pushes 15,000 BTUs of heated or cooled air. This has virtually made my furnace useless unless I am camping without electricity.

    Granted, I have not camped in some of the extreme temperatures that others here on PUP have (even though God knows that I could here in ND), but I did have a spring trip last year where the temps got down to the upper 30's and it got so warm in the pup that I had to turn the temperature switch so it was right in the middle of the hot/cold settings and turned the fan to low.

    The only caveat is that if the temperatures get below freezing the heat pump will automatically shut off to prevent outdoor coil freeze up. But then the auxiliary 5,600 BTU heat strip (same as has been talked about in this thread) will kick in.
     
  2. Busia

    Busia New Member

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    We use an oscillating tower heater with a thermostat to heat, and just the fan on it to cool. I've never used the propane furnace, it makes me nervous.
     
  3. dgarbers

    dgarbers New Member

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    We probably have a similar heater to the one Mrs NV has - it's an oscillating tower heater with a programmable thermostat. We put it on the floor by our bed so that the kids won't bump it if they get up in the night. It works very well and gets the pup toasty. We have the strip heat that is "attached" I guess to the A/C unit, but it barely takes the chill off.

    I've been wondering how those strip heaters and A/C units are for people with allergies . . . We did clean the unit out as thoroughly as we could when we bought it, but I'm still unsure about it.

    We're hoping to go further north into the mountains during the warmer months here, hoping to escape at least some of the heat and humidity.
     
  4. huizarr

    huizarr Member

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    We have an older PUP with the 17000 BTU furnace built in. We went camping over Christmas weekend last year and the furnace kept it comfortable in the PUP. What is nice about that unlike the Buddies it does not use inside air for combustion so there is practically no CO danger. We camped 2 nights and it got down into to mid 20's. Next year we might try the electric heater. The only down side with the add on devices like that is the lack of counter space for the heat to sit on.
     
  5. adamteja

    adamteja New Member

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    We have a built in heater, but we tend to use a plug in ceramic heater. Both are pretty effective to the mid 20s.

    My wife didn't like the propane heater because it would kick in based on the thermostat and man that little bugger is loud. The ceramic heater is a constant noise, so it doesn't wake you up...
     

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