CPAP accessories

Discussion in 'Camping for the Medically/Physically Challenged' started by lonewolf465, Aug 3, 2017.

  1. lonewolf465

    lonewolf465 Member

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    Sep 15, 2013
    After a couple years of putting off, I now have a CPAP machine. Since we frequently dry camp and boondook, I have come to the conclusion a small generator, battery charger and deep cycle battery are the solution to no AC power. Solar is not a consideration since we camp in the forest. Which of the online CPAP suppliers have you had good luck with?? I am looking for a 12 volt convertor. I just with our local home medical supply and their price was almost 2X the internet price. Thanks
     
  2. Jimmcc1961

    Jimmcc1961 New Member

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    May 21, 2017
    I think all you need is a cigarette light plug that fits your machine. Mine works off of 12 volts and the power cord that came with it drops the voltage down to 12 volt DC. I found one online for my machine and then went to amazon.
     
  3. SteveP

    SteveP Active Member

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    May 21, 2015
    Many years ago I did some comparison shopping with several online cpap suppliers. Seems like they were all pretty much in the same price range but for some reason I chose cpap.com. Been doing onesie twosie business with them almost 10 years and I have no complaints. Got 12 volt cords for both my previous and current machines from them, along with a few other odds and ends.
     
  4. crackerJack

    crackerJack Active Member

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    Jan 6, 2014
    Scottsville, KY
    With the right batteries and not using the humidifier heater, you won't need the generator.
     
    NothingsChocking likes this.
  5. sgip2000

    sgip2000 Member

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    Jun 16, 2010
    Hillsboro, OR
    What brand machine do you have?
     
  6. lonewolf465

    lonewolf465 Member

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    Sep 15, 2013
    I have a Resmed Airsense 10
     
  7. sgip2000

    sgip2000 Member

    552
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    Jun 16, 2010
    Hillsboro, OR
  8. Haybale

    Haybale I'd rather be camping!!

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    Aug 22, 2013
    San Diego via MN
    I have the same machine through the VA and they provided me the 12v (12 to 24v) adapter.

    I have a thread related also:
    http://www.popupportal.com/threads/cpap-with-no-on-board-battery.113009/

    With my small set-up I have kept the mask (the pillow) on for over 5 hours and still had battery left in the morning.

    One of those battery packs with 12v plug and jumper cables should get you a few nights of use per charge.
     
  9. lonewolf465

    lonewolf465 Member

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    Sep 15, 2013
    I have the converter ordered. Should be here in a couple of days.
    thanks
     
    Haybale likes this.
  10. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip New Member

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    SE Michigan
    While it may or may not apply to everyone, both my wife and I have SA and we both have our own machines, which was a bit of a challenge for me as the fitter-upper of a system to run them both in the camper when boondocking (which we almost always do) and for me when I go on hunts out west.

    Our camper has a 12 volt system. I actually increased the amp hour capacity with an additional battery (group 24's) wired in parallel. I carry a small inverter genny, a Champion 2000 watt with me that I run a couple hours every day to keep the batteries charged through the camper's converter. Because we both run humidifiers at night, rather than going the passive (air over route) when camping, we both run heated units so it's a bit of a power draw. I added a Aims Power 1000 watt pure sine wave inverter to the camper and a dedicated outlet so we can both plug into clean 110 to run the machines and humidifiers. I can get a full night (8 hours of 2 machines and humidifiers) on my batteries without dropping them below the magical 50% charge but neither of us require excessive pressure (we are both below 7. The higher the pressure, the more power the machines require.

    When I go hunting, I take my S8 and a passive (air over) humidifier (that I made myself from a quart flat sided plastic juice container), a pair of Li-Ion battery packs (each weigh about 3 pounds and are 4" wide x 7" long and 1" thick, a small inverter (my S8 will only run on 110V)and a cigar lighter adapter to recharge the packs in a vehicle and the 110 volt charger (if there is an outlet available).

    Each pack gives me about 12 hours run time, 2 packs are good for 3 days in the mountains before it's recharge time and Li-Ion packs can be discharged to 0 numerous times without harm.

    How I handle the CPAP issue off grid. Been snoozing on a machine for 15 years now, my wife is a newbie, only 2 years. If I camped where there was sufficient sunlight (we camp in the forest mostly), I'd have a couple panels to recharge my batteries with. As it is, I have to rely on a genny, but only a couple hours a say.
     
  11. Haybale

    Haybale I'd rather be camping!!

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    Aug 22, 2013
    San Diego via MN
    Last trip I just hooked up to my car battery each night and went for a drive during the day...
     
  12. lonewolf465

    lonewolf465 Member

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    Sep 15, 2013
    My wife and I both got CPAP machines this fall. I have been exploring ways to power them by battery since we never use electric sites. I went on a solo trip a few weeks ago and figured I could save battery power by shutting off the CPAP heater and humidifer. Here is something I never thought about------it got down to the low 20s the first night of camping. I woke up about 1AM and I couldn't believe how cold my nose was. Pumping 25 degree air probably will do that. I promptly turned on the CPAP heater and went back to sleep in comfort. After a week of camping, I have come to the conclusion a Honda generator to charge the battery is in the future.
     
  13. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip New Member

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    SE Michigan
    What you need to do (to help with the cold air) is put the supply hose under the covers with you. That helps warm the air from your machine. I do that at home too, out bedroom had the heat off. If you use a humidifier, it helps to keep the cold hose from condensing the mpist air in it and causing what's called 'rainout'. My hose is always under the coverts with me.
     
    Haybale likes this.
  14. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip New Member

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    SE Michigan
    Lots of much less expensive alternatives that a Honda. I have a Champion 2000 watt Inverter. Was 399 on sale at generators direct 3 years ago. never have had issue one. Much less expensive than the Honda. Harbor Freight has a 2000 watt Inverter as well. I think it's 299 every day. Honda's are nice but over priced.

    I sold a few years back, a Yamaha 2800I unit. Was also expensive like the Honda but was 10 years old. Figured it was time for a newer one so I got the Champ. Never have looked back.
     
  15. SteveP

    SteveP Active Member

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    May 21, 2015
    I started doing this with my first machine, which did not have a heater. When cold camping I put the machine beside my pillow and cover the entire length of the hose.

    You can also pull the covers over your head, which traps the heat from your exhale and warms your nose from the outside. As long as you don't cover the air intake you won't get that stuffy low oxygen feeling that non-cpappers feel.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2017 at 4:02 PM
    SidecarFlip and Haybale like this.
  16. BikeNFish

    BikeNFish Active Member

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    Apr 24, 2017
    Maplewood, MN
    The wife and I both have CPAPs. I can run both CPAP's for one night on one group size 27 battery (no humidifiers). We are also low pressure, usually between 4 and 5. I keep one dedicated battery and a separate 12V power inverter just for the CPAP's. We don't boondock very often, but if we do, I have decided that I don't want to rely on the solar for charging my CPAP battery because it would take just one cloudy day or a well shaded campsite to take away a restful night sleep.

    I use a Powerhorse 2000W generator from Northern Tool to recharge the battery. It is also nice to have the generator around because I have an electric winch on my pup and it gives me more reliable power than the group 24 battery that is on the pup when raising and lowing the roof.

    The coldest this year that we have used our CPAP's was 42 degrees on three occasions. I didn't notice that my nose got any colder than if I didn't use the CPAP, but 42 is a long way from 20 when camping.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2017 at 9:23 PM
  17. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip New Member

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    SE Michigan
    I just looked at my bedside machine (I have 2 machines myself, one I take camping / hunting, the other stays in the bedroom), anyway my bedroom machine has 33,000 hours logged on it and it's never missed a beat. My wife (who started years after me) has 17,000 hours on hers. Both Resperonics, mine is a Remstar Plus model (bipap) her's is the standard model with built in humidifier. Mine has a separate Fisher Paktel stand alone humidifier. I'm amazed how long they have lasted but neither of us run a lot of pressure. She's at 4.5, I'm at 7 so neither is working hard. We both sleep on S8's when camping and we own all the machines outright so the only cost are the consumables, masks, hoses and filters.
     

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