CPAP moisture/heat exchanger

Discussion in 'Camping for the Medically/Physically Challenged' started by SteveP, Mar 15, 2017.

  1. SteveP

    SteveP Active Member

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    May 21, 2015
    While researching NorcrossFlyer's HDM Z1 mentioned in the thread "CPAP First Time Camping" I stumbled across this Heat/Moisture Exchanger, http://www.cpap.com/productpage/hea...oyzVhiEGcFOIw5D-m30dX6cp31icMlc_WZBoCYfHw_wcB
    It fits between the mask and standard hose and returns moisture and heat from the exhale in the next inhale. They say each unit will last approximately one week. Obviously if your mask vents exhale directly to the air, like my old style mask did, it will not work, but with my current Airfit P10 it might.

    This could be a boon to cpap users camping in arid areas or cooler climes. I am going to order 6 of these for our next extended trip and will try to remember to report back with results. But that won't be for a few months so if anyone has used these before I'd appreciate your feedback.
     
  2. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip New Member

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    Dec 4, 2017
    SE Michigan
    A much cheaper alternative (takes a bit of work on your part) is a quart plastic juice or milk bottle laid on it's side and a fitting in the lid and in the back (from the hardware store nylon barb fittings the size of your hose. Put water in the bottom (about an inch) and lay it on it's side and hook up your hose from the machine to the lid end and your mask hose to the other. That air passing over the water will pick up moisture, called a passive humidifier. What I use when boondocking with my S8 and I power my S8 with a Li-Ion rechargeable battery pack and small inverter. 2 packs gives me 3 days usage. Been on horseback hunts in the mountains, works well.
     
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  3. Haybale

    Haybale I'd rather be camping!!

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    Aug 22, 2013
    San Diego via MN
    Interesting!

    Did they work for you SteveP?
     
  4. SteveP

    SteveP Active Member

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    May 21, 2015
    I was going to try them out this fall on our 4 corners trip, but we couldn't go because of my shoulder injury and family matters. Haven't been able to camp since last summer. I will try them on our trip to Big Bend in late Feb or early March but it might not be cold enough to get a good feel.
     
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  5. SteveP

    SteveP Active Member

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    May 21, 2015
    I finally got to test this thing for a week on our annual week long dry camping trip to Big Bend Ranch State Park. With lows in the high 30s and low 40s and very low humidity it actually lived up to its claims. One module kept my sinuses from drying out for a full week. Definitely worth the $5.00 cost for me and I will continue to use them in the future.

    Still looking for a good way to preheat the hose to avoid those first minutes of chill, the best thing I can come up with is a hot water bottle.
     
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  6. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip New Member

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    My answer to the 'cold hose' scenario is I put it under the covers with me. That necessitates a longer hose than the standard 4 foot (I use a 6 foot) but they are readily available at CPAP.com for cheap.
     
  7. SteveP

    SteveP Active Member

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    May 21, 2015
    I do that too, it's those first few minutes before the hose warms with this technique that I'd like to avoid.
     
  8. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip New Member

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    Dec 4, 2017
    SE Michigan
    Not an issue with us (my wife sleeps on a machine too), we have a 12 volt powered electric blanket (Camping World sells them, so does Amazon) on the bed so we turn it on about 30 minutes before retiring with the hose under the blanket and that warms the hose. They consume very little power btw. It's actually a warming blanket for in the car but it woks well. You can buy (from CPAP.com again), a heated hose but they are 110 volt and I have never had the need. My issue with that is, eventually, the hose gives out and get a pin hole in it. The heated hoses aren't cheap, whereas the no heated hoses are cheap and I'm inherently cheap anyway. My 'heated blanket' stays on the bed all the time as part of the bed covers.
     
  9. jnc

    jnc Welcome from New Hampshire

    SteveP is there any chance you can post a picture of it setup?
     
  10. SteveP

    SteveP Active Member

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    May 21, 2015
    I don't have a pic but you can see an image in the link I posted earlier. The module itself is a about 1.25 inches in diameter and about an inch long, not counting the standard size connectors. It weighs almost nothing and fits between your mask and hose.
     
  11. jnc

    jnc Welcome from New Hampshire

    Thanks. I gave the link a quick read and it had my thinking there was more to it than it just plugging into the mask.
     
  12. Haybale

    Haybale I'd rather be camping!!

    2,398
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    Aug 22, 2013
    San Diego via MN
    To put the hose in the blanket with me was an awesome trick!! It was down to 19*F outside and mid 40*F's inside and it worked great with a $70 walmart jump pack!!
     

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