DH is a diabetic

Discussion in 'Camping for the Medically/Physically Challenged' started by nowjustjules, Feb 13, 2009.

  1. nowjustjules

    nowjustjules New Member

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    Feb 28, 2008
    It's funny as I was reading the what not to forget when camping and all I could really think of was Insulin, and blood glucose test strips and his meter. Everything else is easily replaceable, if expensive, at a campstore or local mom and pop grocery store.

    Happy camping-

    Julie, Ryan, Aidan and Ian
     
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  2. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    Jul 19, 2007
    Ontario
    Yup, DW is diabetic, before we leave I make sure she has enough supplies for the number of days we're going away for plus two extra days just incase. If we're going out of the country, then I make sure she has enough plus 3-5 days.

    Craig...

    <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_pu.gif border=0 align=middle alt="PopUp"> 2004 Palomino Mustang
    <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_suv.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Tow Vehicle"> 1992 GMC Ext. Cab
     
  3. Retired Alex

    Retired Alex New Member

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    Oct 2, 2003
    Limoges, Ontario
    I have my own meter for the trailer, stays there all the time. Here in Canada from time to time you can get them free for just buying the box of test strips.

    Alex & Mary Burnett
    06 Trail Cruiser 26QBS, 2006 F-150 XLT
    http://users.xplornet.com/~burnetta
     
  4. nowjustjules

    nowjustjules New Member

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    Feb 28, 2008
    My DH had a bad low the last two times we went camping and it made me realize how vulnerable we are when camping, even though we were at a campground. I know that we did not have our glucigon (I have no idea how to spell it) shot with us. I will have to pack it with all of my emergency supplies- like juice boxes and my son's inhaler- just in case.

    One week after our camping trip, we had an EMS visit because he was so low too. Besides the obvious, it made me realize how lucky we were when camping because I doubt an ambulance would have made it to our campsite as quickly as it did to our house, and how much that would scare my boys (2 and 5)...

    I suppose if you worry about the could haves you never would do anything.

    Safe travels...

    Julie, Ryan, Aidan and Ian
     
  5. mudrider420

    mudrider420 New Member

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    Jul 27, 2006
    how do you keep the insulin refridgerated? any special need you need to do or have? my g/f was just diagnosed with diabetes and she now need to have a shot everyday. we do a lot of camping (mostly boondocking) and would like some information and/or advise you may have for us.
     
  6. LynnAllen02

    LynnAllen02 Active Member

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    Apr 26, 2006
    Long Island, New York
    Now let others chime in if I am not completely right here...my dog Buddie (my avatar to the left) has diabetes we take his Vetsulin, made from Pork (different from people) on our campouts.

    We travel with it on ice, in bubble wrap...we want it to stay cool but not freeze...the temp in the frig varies alot...afraid it might get too warm or freeze in the Pup, and the only way to get to it is to popup in a parking lot...on ice it's just right, and available in tow vehicle.

    When we get there I put it in the Pup frig, we have a digital thermometer in there and check the temp throughout the day, late at night and early am, and the rig is more stable on propane than battery!

    We also travel with a prescription from our Vet so we could refill if something happened and so people would believe me if they saw all the needles...

    We've knock on wood had no problems over the one season since we found out he had diabetes.

    Lynn

    2006 Pony 283*2008 Liberty* Reserved 2009: 14 days
     
  7. bigdad

    bigdad Active Member

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    Mar 5, 2007
    Springfield Kentucky
    My self i am a diabetic and take pills for my sugar my body makes to much so my sugar level is high so i have to check it every moring if your sugar drops and your are still conscious take about 3 table spoon full and put it in a glass of orange juice this well bring the sugar up. or you can give oral glucose with this the person has to be awake. also make sure he or she has a medcal alert breslet
     
  8. Retired Alex

    Retired Alex New Member

    1,124
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    Oct 2, 2003
    Limoges, Ontario
    I take 5 scheduled injections a day (more if I eat more than 3 meals (1 wobbly pop = 1 slice of bread).
    Here in Canada we can get an injection system called "Penfill". The whole thing looks like a fountain pen and the insulin vial (3ML) is inserted into the pen just like the old fountain pen cartridges. A knob at the top of the pen dials up the dose and push the knob and you are done. All you have to change is the needle tip for each injection.
    The insulin cartridges come in a box of 5 in a bubble pack which I keep in the fridge at home. When camping I just keep them in the bathroom medicine chest. I only take what I will need plus one spare.
    Here in Canada we don't need a perscription to get insulin or diabetic supplies and I have never had a problem crossing the border.

    Alex & Mary Burnett
    06 Trail Cruiser 26QBS, 2006 F-150 XLT
    http://users.xplornet.com/~burnetta
     
  9. LynnAllen02

    LynnAllen02 Active Member

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    Apr 26, 2006
    Long Island, New York
    Hey Alex, How are you and Mary doing?

    We have the Penfill here for people, not dogs yet, and I have seen one woman carry it all day in her purse! Does it not need refrigeration?

    I need the prescription to get someone to refill the Vetsulin at a strange vet! You know if I freeze it or it gets too warm! I think people here need a prescription here also....and the vet just gives me a box and bottle, no label with a scrip on it like any prescriptions I get!

    What I was worried about was that the ranger might think I was doing some sort of illegal drugs with all those needles and not believe the dog has diabetes! I don't throw them in the recycle center, I save them in an empty water bottle and bring them home to my sharps container!

    Lynn

    2006 Pony 283*2008 Liberty* Reserved 2009: 14 days
     
  10. campfixer

    campfixer New Member

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    Aug 13, 2008
    I read about a newer insulin pump on the market that has a built in glucose meter. It said you put the self powered sampleing unit in your abdomen and it constantly monitors your glucose. The pump then gives you insulin as needed and alarms when the blood glucose goes below or above a setpoint. It is supposed to give superior blood sugar control. There are insulin pens in the US also. The ones I am familiar with are disposable and don't get refrigerated after the first use.

    Edited by - campfixer on April 08 2009 22:55:13
     
  11. tsc

    tsc Member

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    Aug 20, 2008
    SW Ontario, Canada
    I'm not a diabetic, but I deal with diabetes all the time (and usually not in a good way--I'm a Paramedic).

    Here are a few suggestions.

    1. Get a digital fridge thermometer with a temp alarm. It will go off, when it gets too hot or too cold. (I've seen some no name ones and a Polder one). It will keep your insulin at the right temp.--Obviously if your NIDDM or Type II you won't have to worry about insulin

    2. Keep a log of your BG readings (blood glucose), so if something should happen, we know what is the normal range for you. Also,if you travel across the Can/US boarder at all, write the measuring units down with your readings(mg/dL or mmol/L). I work an area on the hwy 401, where we get a lot of Americans coming from Detroit or Port Huron going to Buffalo via Canada. You should hear some of the people flip out when I get a reading of 3.6 mmol/L. I know the dL system is 100+ readings

    3. Carry around a small tube of cake icing or gluco-gel(any colour but red--it looks like blood); if you BG drops suddenly and you are not able to protect your own airway (and glucogon and or D50 IV is not an option). A little squeeze (not enough to choke) between the cheek and teeth will provide some suger sublingually (it wil be absorbed under the tounge).

    4. If you can get a insulin pump. Get it and get it NOW!!!! It will add years to your life. Instead of spiking and coasting with insulin shots, it provides a slow and constant release of insulin (like the body would normally do).

    Edited by - tsc on April 09 2009 01:27:31
     
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  12. jim1999

    jim1999 New Member

    I know this is an old topic, but just thought I would chime in on the meters. Most companies that make them will give you one if you go to their web site and apply. I recently got two One Touch meters by sending in two requests. One for me and one under my wife's name. I needed a new one anyway and I thought having a spare would be great since my son ruined my last one.

    1994 Jayco 1006
    Its not what we take with us that matters but what we leave behind that counts.
     
  13. MamaK

    MamaK Member

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    Sep 27, 2008
    CT
    The meter goes along with whatever other medication/ supplies we'll need for a trip. It's listed on the check off list just to make sure it's not forgotten in the rush to escape..
     
  14. WeRJuliIan

    WeRJuliIan If it's "Aluminum", why not "Sodum" and "Uranum"?

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    May 15, 2014
    Sarasota, FL
    Just a tip...from personal experience..

    Don't keep your BG meter in the same kit as your insulin, if you're going to put it in the fridge or cooler...
    The meters don't like being cold, and will either signal an error, or the battery will just die.
    In the first case, holding it in a closed hand or putting it in a pocket next to your skin, for a few minutes may fix it.
    In the second case... well, you do carry a spare battery, right ?

    (Never mind how I know, I just do... :)

    Ian, the diabetic man from Scotland.
     
  15. bob barnes

    bob barnes Well-Known Member

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    Mar 26, 2017
    I tried to get my dr to get me one she said no way!!!
     
  16. bob barnes

    bob barnes Well-Known Member

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    Mar 26, 2017
    as a side-note we go to Europe sometimes for 2 mos at a time we don't refrigerate just keep it in the car coolest place we can find!
     
  17. WeRJuliIan

    WeRJuliIan If it's "Aluminum", why not "Sodum" and "Uranum"?

    936
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    May 15, 2014
    Sarasota, FL
    There's a certain amount of history around insulin.
    Back in the day, when it was made from animal proteins, it was very "delicate", and could be easily damaged by even moderate extremes of temperature.

    Today's synthetics are more stable, and will last a week or two at room temperature, but they are still a fragile protein, and will break up and become useless is they get too hot, or too cold.
    I carry my pen injectors with me pretty much all the time. If I'm travelling, i have a carry case that includes a space for a gel-pack that is pre-frozen. When I stop, the gel pack goes in the freezer of the trailer or hotel fridge, and the insulin goes in the regular fridge.

    On the subject of pumps... I asked my endocrinologist, and she said that, while the pump is a good idea, the associated "continuous glucose monitoring" technology still leaves a lot to be desired, in terms of accuracy... and I'm not sure I want to have a CGM sensor removed and a new one implanted, every month :)

    Ian. the sugar-free man from Scotland
     
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  18. bob barnes

    bob barnes Well-Known Member

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    I was going broke buying name brand insulin take my word for it you will! I found Walmart has private label insulin both types for 27.00 a vial you don't even need a prescription. I don't fuss about keeping it cold I keep my stash in the fridge but everyday vials set in a drawer!

    I asked my dr about a pump she said no way I think they also can be money hogs maybe if you have great insurance you can afford them but they are not for the average diabetic!
     
  19. WeRJuliIan

    WeRJuliIan If it's "Aluminum", why not "Sodum" and "Uranum"?

    936
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    May 15, 2014
    Sarasota, FL
    Bob... it's worth mentioning that the OTC(in some states) insulins, sold in Walmart are not the same, by a long way, as the more modern formulations.
    If they work for you, more power to you, but the older NPH and R insulins are much less predictable and can involve a lot more management. And some of us just can't use them at all....
    You just have to stick to what works for you...
     
  20. bob barnes

    bob barnes Well-Known Member

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    well I guesss I am lucky some of that highly advertised stuff can be pricey!!
     

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