highest elevation for mr buddy heater

Discussion in 'Heating / Cooling Systems' started by motor12, Mar 5, 2008.

  1. motor12

    motor12 New Member

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    going to colorado this spring and plan to heat with a mr buddy. what is the highest altitude you have used your mr. buddy?
     
  2. McCullah

    McCullah New Member

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    If you are concerned about it, call the Mr. Buddy people-I used propane in Yellowstone with no problems

    Mick and Sheri
    '06 Dodge Mega Cab
    2007 Palomino Yearling 4102
    (look for the Arkansas Razoraback Tacky Lights :)
    nights camped 2007 28 --
    reserved so far 2008 11--
     
  3. Tekboy46

    Tekboy46 Member

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    Haven't used a Buddy, but when I lived in Colorado we used propane stoves regularly in the mountains at 9, 10,000 feet. Instead of altitude,the biggest thing we worried about was keeping the cylinders warm in sub-freezing temps near timberline because when it got down to say 10 degrees or so it seemed the propane had a hard time atomizing and staying lit. So unless you're going to camp at 10k feet like near Leadville, you should be fine in the spring unless there's a 10 degree surprise Blue Norther blow in... and trust me it can happen! Have a good time... I miss my mountains!

    1979 Starcraft Venture
    1996 Ford F150 TV
     
  4. ogeer3

    ogeer3 New Member

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    The problem with the Mr. Buddy is the low oxygen sensor. Above about 5000 feet the air is thin enough that they wonÂ’t work because of the low oxygen sensor. I know they will not work at 7000 feet.

    Happy Camping!

    '05 Silverado TV <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_suv.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Tow Vehicle">
    '03 Skamper PU <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_pu.gif border=0 align=middle alt="PopUp">
    Grand Prairie, TX <img src=../Images/flags/us-army.jpg border=0 align=middle alt="US Army"> <img src=../Images/flags/us-powmia.jpg border=0 align=middle alt="POW/MIA">
     
  5. McCullah

    McCullah New Member

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    I had not thought of the sensor. Good point.

    Mick and Sheri
    '06 Dodge Mega Cab
    2007 Palomino Yearling 4102
    (look for the Arkansas Razorback Tacky Lights :)
    nights camped 2007 28 --
    reserved so far 2008 13--
     
  6. GRIZZLY

    GRIZZLY New Member

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    Used my big buddy at 6,500 ft. last fall on a grouse hunting trip with no problem. As allways, best to have a back-up source just in case though. Have fun.
     
  7. dhmoore

    dhmoore New Member

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    I used my little buddy heater on top of the Grand Mesa here in CO a couple years back on a snowmobile trip in the popup. Elevation on top where we were at is 10000 and the temperature was around 0 at night. Took the little guy a few times to light up and stay lit, and had a few times where it would shut off because of low oxygen levels. But after a while it seemed to work just fine and we used it for the 2 or 3 hours that the propane bottle had in it. My little buddy heater worked great considering the conditions, needless to say we had very warm sleeping bags!

    77me<img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_bbq.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Barbeque">
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    Edited by - dhmoore on March 07 2008 12:54:16
     
  8. ogeer3

    ogeer3 New Member

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    dhmoore,
    My Mr. Buddy would not work at just over 7000 feet last year. I have not heard of anyone having one work at 10000 feet up to now. Has your little buddy been modified or is the low oxygen sensor disabled in it or something?
    I went and got a different heater with no low oxygen sensor so I would not have that problem this year.

    Happy Camping!

    '05 Silverado TV <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_suv.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Tow Vehicle">
    '03 Skamper PU <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_pu.gif border=0 align=middle alt="PopUp">
    Grand Prairie, TX <img src=../Images/flags/us-army.jpg border=0 align=middle alt="US Army"> <img src=../Images/flags/us-powmia.jpg border=0 align=middle alt="POW/MIA">

    Edited by - ogeer3 on March 07 2008 13:09:07
     
  9. Funrover

    Funrover New Member

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    Well I have a Mr.Heater that I take campin all the time here in CO. Highest I had it was in Winter Park Colorado up in the mountains right around 10,000 feet and it worked fine for me!
     

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