Installing bed support help

Discussion in 'General Camper Setup / Take Down' started by mjac, Aug 29, 2016.

  1. mjac

    mjac New Member

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    1996 Coleman Taos. Its old, no frills, small, light weight and in pristine shape. I flipped the axle over, has larger tires and it goes wherever I want to go. It's a keeper.

    On the underside of each bed, there are two bed supports. Each fold down and I have to lift and slip the poles in place. The female end slips over a male pin on the trailer frame.

    The problem part of the operation is the lifting up and slipping in place. I am often alone and with a bad back, I find it most difficult to be lifting and slipping the supports in place at the same time.

    Before I try to re-invent the wheel, I was wondering if anyone has the similar difficulty and what did they do to overcome the problem. A bottle jack and a piece of wood up to each corner as I put each support in place would allow me to lower the support over each pin but seems way overkill and awkward.

    Thanks
     
    Truckinhardp088 likes this.
  2. PopUpSteve

    PopUpSteve Administrator

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    Well, this is a new one. I don't recall anyone making a mod to the bed supports. Although it is a common issue. Many of us as at the point where back pain is a concern. After a long drive with a bad back, doing a camper setup can be torture.

    Fortunately for me, my new Somerset E2 has a newer system which make it very easy to install the bed supports. But I don't think it's something which can be retrofitted to older campers.

    Some older campers had the supports going to the ground, like table legs. The problem there however is you never know what you may find when it come to the condition of the ground you're setting up on. If it muddy, you make wake up in the mud in the middle of the night.

    So I don't really have a solution for you except to say grin and bear it.
     
  3. mjac

    mjac New Member

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    Thanks Steve.

    I have a idea that may work on the rear bed. I am thinking I could use a turn buckle and all thread. Position one end on the bumper (make a hole and a washer stop?) and the other end, will attach somehow, temporally to the bed. Then turn the TB as needed (like a jack) to raise and lower the bed enough to slide the support on to the pin.
    I am not near the pup at present and am only guessing that there is a stop to prevent the bed from going out while trying to turnbuckle the bed upward.

    Still thinking on the front bed as I can't recall if there is something there to push on.

    Thanks.
     
  4. rustybronco

    rustybronco Member

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    I have three herniated disc's.

    I use a length of wood and a small trolley jack whenever I don't have help to lift the bed platform. I also use that same jack to level the trailer from time to time*. A farm jack with a length of wood may work as well, as should an old jack stand with a piece of all thread down the middle.

    So many ways to skin this cat.

    * Bought for changing the spare tire.
     
  5. jbone

    jbone New Member

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  6. ScoobyDoo

    ScoobyDoo New Member

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    Your might be more of a challenge than mine, but my system is look, put the lower end in place. Holding near the top of pole with one hand, I find the slot with the other. Then squat just a little, only need to lift couple of inches. Put belly/chest/shoulder, depending on the starting height. Lift with legs, one hand guides the other...
     
  7. ShellRidenour

    ShellRidenour Live, Laugh, Love & Camp

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    Our older Coleman Destiny series had bunk bed supports that we're permanently attached to the bottom of the bunk. The easiest way I found was to swing them down, have them almost ready to slip over the knobby thing (male end) on the bumper, that's when I would actually be under the bunk end and was able to lift up slightly with my shoulder or back just enough to get it on. Little effort for me, but it would depend on the severity of your back injury/pain.
     
  8. SmilinBeard

    SmilinBeard Member

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    I had a Coleman Sea Pine that worked the same way. When we moved up to a Coleman Niagara [high wall] it came with "back saver" supports. I can't say that it is all that much of a back saver, but it is better than what you have. The upper end of the support bars run in a slot. When the supports are in their storage position, they are at the far end of the slots, so you can just release them from their holder and they pop into the male fittings on the bumper without your needing to lift up. When both are in place you pull and lift the bed and the lock snaps in place. To release them, you pull and lift, then release the locks. They slide in the slots and come right off the male piece.

    Finding them might be a problem, since Coleman/Fleetwood is no more, but Beckley's RV bought up much of the spare stock when Coleman/Fleetwood folded and they have a good web store. I'm sure you could retrofit them to your bed bottoms, but you would likely need to cut the supports.

    I don't know if this will make it easy enough for your back, but maybe you know someone with a newer Niagara, to try it out. If it works, It would save all the hassle of dealing with jacks [which can be heavy and a strain, themselves].
     
  9. aslag

    aslag Pacific Northwest

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    Our son stopped camping with us this year because of work and college, without his help it was just too much on my bad back (had a spinal fusion a couple of years ago) to install those darn bed supports. So we sold our Flagstaff PUP and got a Trailmanor which is much easier to set up and tows pretty much like the PUP. If our old Flagstaff had the backsaver type bed supports we'd still have it.
     

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