New Pop-Up Owner with Air Conditioner. Shopping for the right generator.

Discussion in 'First Time & New Camper Owners' started by Scott Little, Apr 17, 2018.

  1. Scott Little

    Scott Little New Member

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    Apr 17, 2018
    Hi there, my name is Scott. I am a new pop-up owner of a 2011 Rockwood HW-277. This unit has an ac unit and all the appliances. I am looking at a Yamaha Inverter EF2400iSHC 2400 Watt 5.5 HP Generator, would this be enough to power my unit? I am camping in Cape Cod later this summer and want to be able to use the air. Would this power the air but nothing else or would power it all? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Mogimus

    Mogimus Active Member

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    Apr 29, 2015
    Rancho Cucamonga, CA
    I believe that to run the A/C you need at least 3,000 watts.

    I tried running my A/C with a Honda 3500 inverter generator and it would overload the generator plugging in the trailer and running the A/C at the same time but it would run the A/C by itself.
     
  3. BikeNFish

    BikeNFish Well-Known Member

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    Maplewood, MN
    Everything I have ever read said that running a camper's A/C on a generator requires a MINIMUM of 3000 watts. The A/C may run on less, but you are overloading it and you will eventually prematurely kill the generator.
     
  4. Rusty2192

    Rusty2192 Active Member

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    A popular option seems to be two 2,000 watt inverter generators connected using a parallel cable. That way each unit is easier to handle than a 3,000 watt and if your needs are smaller, like for just charging batteries, you can get just run 1 at a time.
     
  5. joet

    joet Well-Known Member

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    Mar 16, 2011
    Elkins WV area
    to start with: Welcome from the West Virginia mountains.
    I have a eu3000si Honda and can run everything to include A/C with no problems.
    A 2500 watt jenny will run your A/C.. You might have to add a hard start kit, as startup amps are more than the run amps.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2018
  6. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

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    I run my AC on a 3000 watt with no problems.

    If i were buying new, I would consider a Champion invertor.
     
  7. Raycfe

    Raycfe Waterford Ct.

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    Waterford, Ct
    6ad4135f4a202c41426d6f8c1f8a6abc--welcome-to-group.jpg from southeast Connecticut.
     
  8. xZoomerZx

    xZoomerZx Active Member

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    Nov 1, 2016
    I can power any 2 high draw appliances at once with my Harbor Freight "predator" 3000/3500 generator. A.C. pulls exactly 1500 watts leaving enough for coffee maker or a Danish in the microwave.
    While HF has a less than a top shelf rep, their generator is surprisingly good. Hefty @100 lbs, but 1/3 the price of big name gennys.
     
  9. davido

    davido Active Member

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    Jul 17, 2014
    There is the standard running load to consider, which may be 15A. But there's also the spike that occurs during compressor start-up, and that can easily reach 20A. I can't even reliably run my 13500 BTU AC off of normal 15A house wiring.

    The other thing to consider is that a generator rated at 2000W is probably designed to sustain some level less than that. The 2000W sticker on the side is spikes. 2000W is 17A, at 115VAC. So a 13500 BTU air conditioner will spike above the surge capacity of a 2000W generator, and then will settle in somewhere at or slightly above the continuous-run capacity of the generator. This could shorten the life of the AC unit (it's bad for it to try to start up without having quite enough power), and bad for the generator (running constantly at full capacity, and then some).

    A 15000 BTU air conditioner is even more "impossible" to run reliably off of a 2000W generator.

    So people are faced with a choice: Go with a 3000W generator, which is really at the edge of being too heavy for a single person to lift, and which will get slightly worse fuel consumption under low load, or go with a pair of 2000W generators, which are easier to lift, but will get slightly worse fuel consumption under higher loads, but with the other advantage that under low loads you can just run one of them, not both.

    There's also the cost to consider. A pair of 2000W generators will probably set you back more than a single 3000W unit.

    Either way, you're camping, out in nature, sitting in your PUP listening to the AC blow, while you and your neighbors will be enduring the drone of one or two generators, hour after hour. And then just around the time you'd like to get some sleep on a hot night, quiet hours begin and you're asked to kill the generators.

    I have air conditioning on my PUP, but I only use it at places that offer shore power. I live in Northern Utah, and many of our best camping destinations are in the hot deserts of Southern Utah. First step is avoiding Moab and Zion in July and August. And then if I anticipate weather turning hot during a trip into So UT, I'll book a campsite with electricity. I know this limits my options somewhat, but I wouldn't really enjoy 100 degree weather cooped up in the PUP with AC anymore than I would enjoy a week of being cooped up in the PUP under heavy rain conditions.
     
    Byrd_Huntr likes this.
  10. Byrd_Huntr

    Byrd_Huntr Well-Known Member

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    Jan 27, 2013
    Minnesota
    I think your post really strikes at the heart of the beast. Is a person camping or just sitting in a survival pod? Comfort starts with the choices you make about when and where. Our species thrives in almost every climate in the world, so the body adapts quickly to temperature swings...
     

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