Rockwood wheel bearing size

Discussion in 'Tires / Brakes / Bearings / Axles' started by jeep4475, May 4, 2018.

  1. jeep4475

    jeep4475 New Member

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    Mar 24, 2018
    Hello, I'm replacing my wheel bearings in my new to me 1997 rockwood 1620. I purchased it this spring for $400, and had to replace the top due to dry rot. Surprisingly enough all appliances work exec the propane line to the furnace. The P.O. put a screw through the copper line from inside the trailer.

    Chases loot good, but driver's side grease cap was missing and bearings show slight signs of rust. Pulled bearings from both sides, neither side has any legible numbers. Just was hoping that someone might know the numbers, or have an original manual showing the numbers of the wheel bearings, before I spend my Saturday trying to match them by size.
    Thanks everyone.
     
  2. Raycfe

    Raycfe Waterford Ct.

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    Oct 3, 2007
    Waterford, Ct
    Measure the spindle diameters where the bearings sit on and the seal. Part number will follow once we get info.
     
  3. Wrenchgear

    Wrenchgear Near Elmira, Southern Ontario

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    Aug 5, 2010
    5 Star Eagle Camper
    Bearings are relatively cheap to buy. You can get inner and outer, cup and cone, plus a seal, enough to do one wheel for around $20. You can take the bearings to any bearing shop and they will just put a pair of calipers on it and tell you right away what you need. Buy like Ray said, measure the axle stub is an easy way to figure it out. My 2002 Rockwood has 1 1/16 axle stubs, so the bearings are #L44649 and L44610, cup and cone. Both inner and outer are the same on mine. I'm guessing yours are the same.
     
  4. Matt Benoit

    Matt Benoit Active Member

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    Jul 30, 2017
    Warren, MI
    I purchased new hubs from etrailer that came with the races already pressed in, both bearings and a seal for $20.
     
  5. jeep4475

    jeep4475 New Member

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    Mar 24, 2018
    It was actually very easy, I just went down to my local trailer store and they match them up no problem, they said don't go to any auto part store here, they tend to get the sizes wrong. It was less than $10 for both sides
     
  6. Matt Benoit

    Matt Benoit Active Member

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    Jul 30, 2017
    Warren, MI
    Hope you replaced the bearings AND the races... They wear together over time.
     
  7. jeep4475

    jeep4475 New Member

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    Mar 24, 2018
    Of course. I actually took the whole part in so they could match it all.
     
  8. Boilerblues

    Boilerblues New Member

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    Apr 16, 2018
    Centerville, OH
    I have a 2014 Rockwood 2318G. I've been looking for the info to find the right parts to order, but am not having any luck. Owner's manual doesn't seem to have it. We just bought ours used and the previous owners didn't do anything with the bearings. I figured I should go ahead and do it. Just need the parts and some good instructions.
     
  9. Matt Benoit

    Matt Benoit Active Member

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    Jul 30, 2017
    Warren, MI
    Easiest way to make sure that you buy the right parts is to remove the old bearings and look for numbers. Best to replace bearing (inner and outer) races and rear seal. Parts might cost you $10 per side online. Races can be hard to remove. I chose to replace the whole hub, wich came with new races installed, new bearings and a seal. I paid $20 per side.
     
  10. p

    p Active Member

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    Jun 9, 2014
    I have gone to more then one store with the parts in my hand....a Rv store and a parts supply store and they gave me the wrong ones. Find someone you know is good...show them the parts. Or else you could be in for a nasty surprise.
     
  11. Wrenchgear

    Wrenchgear Near Elmira, Southern Ontario

    2,784
    199
    Aug 5, 2010
    5 Star Eagle Camper
    Keep in mind that bearings don't often need to be replaced, if ever. Yes bearing wear out, but that's from poor maintenance, so keep up on them. After cleaning the bearings in varsol, and wiping the races clean and dry so you can get a good look at them, there are a few things to check for. Are the rollers solid purple or black? That means they have been overheated. Are the rollers pitted? Is the race (the cone pressed in the hub) pitted? That means the chroming is coming off the parts, possibly from water intrusion. Is there rust? Is the cage that holds the rollers on damaged?

    The cage is always loose while holding the rollers on, so that is not a concern, unless it somehow became so loose that rollers are falling out. If rollers are slightly discoloured, that is pretty much normal. Races and rollers need to be perfectly smooth and shiny to be considered good.

    Wash them thoroughly in varsol or with a spray parts cleaner, dry with compressed air (preferred), or with a rag, and inspect. Pack them with good quality wheel bearing grease, (www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhL1uAp_WCw), install a new seal to keep the water out, and you will get years and years out of a set of bearings. You can easily get 100,000 miles out of a set of wheel bearings if you clean them a repack them every few years. I do my Pup bearings about every 3rd summer.

    As a side note, I keep and extra set of trailer bearings in my trailer tool box. There is a new seal and cotter pin, and bearings all packed with grease and ready to go. They are in a ziplock sandwich bag, and in a tupperware type of container to keep everything clean and dry. Makes for a breeze of a repair on the side of the road or at a campsite if the was some sort of problem.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2018
  12. Boilerblues

    Boilerblues New Member

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    Apr 16, 2018
    Centerville, OH
    surely some place lists the type of bearings and part needed without taking it apart? I'm nervous that if I take it apart to get the parts then it will take me a while to find the parts, and then another while to actually get them put on. It took me 5 months to replace a toilet when it stopped working right, nothing happens fast in my home (4 young children). I'd rather order the parts and have them on hand for when I get a moment.

    Any idea about how to find out what the right parts are? I'd rather order online too, getting to a store is hard.
     
  13. mpking

    mpking Active Member

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    Jun 17, 2014
    Raynham, MA
    Call these guys (Found via google search)
    https://www.tegtmeyertrailers.com/service

    Ask them how much to repack bearings, and how long it will take.

    Compare that quote versus your time plus the questions you have asked. (My local trailer repair shop was $50 bucks to repack the bearings, plus parts.) Just for giggles, go ahead and call a camper place. (I was quoted $200, and a waiting time of 3 months)
     
  14. Matt Benoit

    Matt Benoit Active Member

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    Jul 30, 2017
    Warren, MI
    Definitely order from etrailer.com

    You don't want to take a chance of ordering the wrong parts. It's simple to do.

    1. Jack up the trailer and place a jackstand under the frame member. 2.Remove wheel.
    3. Pop off dust cap on hub
    4. Pull out cotter pin
    5. Back off castle nut
    6. Pull entire hub off

    Outer bearing will likely fall on the ground when removing hub. Inner bearing is under the rear seal on the back of the hub. Verify the identification numbers on the bearings (determine if the inner and outer are the same). Sit everything aside and order your parts. Etrailer will have them to you in a few days. Reverse process to install (after packing bearings of course)
     

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