Thinking about the dark side...what are my lightest hybrid choices?

Discussion in 'PopOut (Hybrids)' started by Canoe2fish, Oct 1, 2017.

  1. Canoe2fish

    Canoe2fish Member

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    Apr 14, 2014
    yes, the guy who for years loved a 9' Coleman is thinking of a hybrid. A TT is not for us. It must have one fold out bunk and a decent lounge or couch PLUS the dinette.

    Camping in cold weather in this tiny Coleman is not going to cut it. DW wants some comforts on rainy/cold days (aka comfy lounging inside)

    Is there anything in this configuration under 3000lbs?

    Must be SUV/minivan towable

    No dinette sleeping such as TT, T@B, Aliners
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2017
  2. NMroamer

    NMroamer Active Member

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    They make a single fold out hybrid that would fill the bill for you.
    Do some online searches and I bet that you will one that the DW would like.
    It is easy to find TT that weigh 3000lbs or less.
     
  3. jeicher

    jeicher Member

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    My 2011 StarCraft AR-One 15RB is listed for an unloaded weight of 2600 lbs. Mine has aluminum siding but the newer ones use fiberglass siding which makes them a couple of hundred lbs. heavier. The 13" tires on mine were near the GVW so I upgraded to 14" wheels and tires to increase the limit and slow down the bearing speed a bit.
    See floorplan & specs at https://photos.app.goo.gl/G6LkXxclff8wI3k12
     
    WunFiddy and Canoe2fish like this.
  4. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    First I want to say is not to fall for the dry weight as real weight as it is usually heavier then you may think. If you think you are going to be towing in the mountains I don't think this will be a safe combination. Sure you may be able to tow it but will your vehicle be able to control it if something was to happen. You will probably need to look into a single axle camper, perhaps an ultra lite. I know clippers and Vikings have a small hybrid with a gross weight under 3500. I don't think I've seen any with a gross under 3000 though. A big limiting factor I think is tongue weight. Again don't fall for the dry tongue weight that you will find on a lot of campers.
     
  5. jacrabbitt

    jacrabbitt Active Member

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    i agree with jmkay. Dry weight on my Jayco 18F 2900 real world iis 32 or 33. I don't haul water. Now the 7 wide Jake EXP's might be a little lighter but you can forget about anything with a slide.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
  6. giadiep

    giadiep Active Member

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    Syracuse, NY
    Towing a hybrid or TT is more difficult than a pup because of the surface area. There's a lot more wind resistance. Make sure your tow vehicle doesn't have a limit for the surface area of the trailer. I don't think that a Venza would be able to tow one very well.
     
  7. mpking

    mpking Active Member

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    Raynham, MA
    Interested in following this thread
     
  8. chambo

    chambo Active Member

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    Apr 27, 2015
    Southern California
    Is 3000 pounds the towing limit of your vehicle, or what you prefer to stay under? 3000 pounds is right at the limit of a light HTT, and you'll most likely go over once you're loaded up.
     
  9. Sneezer

    Sneezer Active Member

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    Aug 8, 2015
    DFW, TX
    I looked at several earlier in the year. There are some light weight HTTs out there, but once loaded they are going to be very close, if not over your max tow capacity. I don't think I saw many that had a lounge and a dinette, usually just a dinette. I also found that most of the small HTT felt very cramped until you went to a slide model. For me the benefits of a HTT or TT were storage capacity, big bathroom, big galley and more seating. The smaller ones were only marginally better than a pup, and the bathrooms were so cramped that I would hesitate to use them. The larger slide ones usually had the bigger shower which would make a big difference for me.
     
  10. Canoe2fish

    Canoe2fish Member

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    Apr 14, 2014
    Thanks folks. No mountain towing. Primary use would be flat/rolling hills. The primary will be a Silverado 1/2 ton 4x4 until we replace it, likely with a Toyota Highlander (5000 lb cap)

    I just want to be able to tow it with the Venza if I absolutely have to. (Prob never, or just to shuttle from storage or move around at home etc)

    I wouldn't want to tow anything that big with the Venza and for the future Highlander upgrade, I want 1k in reserve for wind after gear is loaded. I won't carry water except for in the CG.

    I'm not opposed to another pup, but a PUP with wider bunks, a shower and toilet and a COMFY couch..assuming that's a needle in the haystack and a PITA to set up...
     
  11. giadiep

    giadiep Active Member

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    Syracuse, NY
    Okay, so I'll use mine as an example. My HTT is 4500 lbs loaded, about 550-600 lbs tongue weight.
    I normally tow it with my 2014 Toyota Tundra, which has a towing capacity of 9500 lbs.
    I have towed it with my 2014 Dodge Durango (V6 model) with a towing capacity of 6000 lbs.

    While the Durango can tow my HTT, the difference between it and the Tundra is noticeable. It is not nearly as stable and is more susceptible to crosswinds and swaying. I think the shorter wheelbase and lower weight of the Durango is to blame here. Also, the towing power is not nearly as good. It has to work really hard to pull the brick wall behind it.

    While you can tow a small HTT with a Highlander, you will likely experience the same thing. Looks like you are a Toyota fan. When we replace our Durango (we plan to keep the Tundra for a long time) I'll likely look for a late model Sequoia or maybe a new 4Runner. The Sequoia has the same 8 cylinder engine as the Tundra but just a little less towing capability. However, they are very confident cruisers on the road.
     
  12. bikendan

    bikendan Member

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    As far as I know, the standard GVWR for the smallest hybrids, is 3500lbs.
    And they all have extremely poor CCC numbers.
    Unless you go find some pre-2004 R-Vision smallest hybrids, like the Bantam, you probably won't find any that have lower GVWRs.
     
  13. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    Ok, I feel better about this knowing you have another TV other than the van you referenced in your earlier post. Most any hybrid 20' or less will have what your looking for, however finding a floorplan you like will be a problem. Most of the ones I looked at had the dinnette sitting in front of the bunkend and the couch was just an extension to the dinnette seat. Just not what I was looking for for my family, but could work if it's just you and the wife.
     
  14. Canoe2fish

    Canoe2fish Member

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    Thanks again folks. We are going to look at what's out there at this years rv show but truthfully, I think it may be PUP for some time to come. I want space but lightweight. Maybe a 12' PUP with 2 dinettes (leave the big table at home)
    That and carry a porta potty
     
  15. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    Oct 10, 2013
    Northern Virginia
    Not sure what's available in your area, but you can try and find a popup with a slideout. Mine even comes with a built in potty. However obviously you will still have the setup and the slideout does add one extra step. When My my old Jayco died I first started looking at TT or hybrids, and highwalls. Ended up going for a large popup not quite a highwall. Like you I really didnt want to lose the space and openness I feel with the popup. Sadly all the units I could tow seemed dark And adding 3 other people plus 2 dogs would have made it very tight. I have a Fleetwood Utah, I have the couch dinnette and toilet, AC and furnace. Everything I was looking for, and the slideout gave me the space for everyone plus the dogs. Like you mentioned go to some RV shows walk in many, try out things like the bed, shower and toilet to see how you would like it. See if you can find a dealer with a popup with a slideout and walk into those. Then make yourself a pros and cons list. Think of things such as storage etc as well as comfort. Will you have city or HOA issues if you store your hybrid/TT at home or would you be stuck having to find storage. It might be a while before you find something you like, but I'm sure something is out there for you.
     
  16. Canoe2fish

    Canoe2fish Member

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    Found a nice PUP with 2 slide outs and a potty. Looks huge in comparison

    I spent a few hours at an rv dealer. Not one trailer spoke to me except for one hybrid but the mattress was worse than my PUP
     
  17. chambo

    chambo Active Member

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    Apr 27, 2015
    Southern California
    I found the foam mattress on my 1996 PUP to be more comfortable than the "spring" mattress on my 2017 HTT. I guess they just don't make them like the use to. I added a foam topper to the HTT and sleep great now.
     
    Canoe2fish likes this.
  18. PointyCamper

    PointyCamper Active Member

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    Nov 25, 2015
    There is a website I haunt called smalltrailerenthusiast that reports on just that. I dont know how many are hybrids though.
    The main problem I found with the small trailers is still tongue weight.
    There seems to be a lot of new models coming on the market now.
     
    Canoe2fish likes this.
  19. WunFiddy

    WunFiddy New Member

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    Oct 28, 2017
    Loserpeg, Manitoba
    Forgot about that page, thanks for reminding me. Helpful as that site is always on the look out for lighter designs. Unfortunately couples trailers is the way most manufacturers lean for small ight trailers.
     
  20. nhlakes

    nhlakes Active Member

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    Oct 15, 2011
    DE and NH
    If I recall correctly, my Bantam B21B HTT weighed around 3k empty and around 4k loaded - however I felt it was still too much for our fairly new 4runner. Stability was more of an issue than power.

    I talked my wife into trading her minivan for a Suburban. It was MUCH more comfortable towing it with a Suburban than the 4runner. (would not have even considered it with the minivan) Longer wheelbase made it much more stable and comfortable ride. We towed that thing all around the country, over the rockies, etc...
     

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