What's up with all the dark wood?

Discussion in 'PopOut (Hybrids)' started by jacrabbitt, Apr 13, 2017.

  1. jacrabbitt

    jacrabbitt Member

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    Mar 27, 2015
    Michigan
    Seems to me that most manufacturers have gone to the dark wood trims dark floors, it's like walking into a cave. This must be the trend of late. It's damn near impossible to find a new unit with oak or lighter trims. Just ranting here. Prefer lighter brighter. don't think I'd buy. Hope it a phase.
     
  2. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    Oct 10, 2013
    Northern Virginia
    I agree the colors are very dark...Too dark for my taste. However it's funny, the few people I've talked to absolutely love the colors. My mom is one of them. I prefer oak preferably light oak. My first camper built in 1990 had oak and county blue and I loved it. My current camper built in 04 has orange wood and green. My dad loves the "manly" colors and thinks I should leave it. Not going to happen. Camper's do seem to go through color phases. The last few years are the dark color, I guess to give the impression of a more expensive camper or easier to hide imperfections. Who knows I just hope it changes.
     
  3. Ductape

    Ductape Member

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    Jun 12, 2013
    Remember when the trend was all white cabinets ?

    It's just a trend.
     
  4. bols2Dawall

    bols2Dawall S.W. Ontario

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    May 19, 2010
    I personally love the dark colors , makes it look cozy and classy
     
  5. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    Albuquerque, NM
    The dark colors were prevalent even 2-1/2 years ago when we bought our TT. Since we were going small (17' - it's just about the same length as our 8' Cobalt was open), we wanted a lighter interior. We didn't want a cave, and since if we're inside it's apt to be night or bad weather, lighter was better. Our pups were light, which had helped; the floor in the Cobalt was medium. We tend to keep throw rugs on the floor, so that's not a huge issue for us.
    The Retro we ended up buying has light walls and cherry-look wood, plus a black and white checkered floor. In the time since we bought our Retro, Whitewater has expanded color choices, so there are birch-look interiors and other floor choices. (They don't make a pop-up, though have expanded both ends of the size range, to tiny tear-drops and a 5th wheel.)
     
    bob barnes likes this.
  6. JustRelax

    JustRelax Member

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    Feb 20, 2013
    Indianapolis
    I prefer the darker cabinets but like lighter floors and walls. I wouldn't buy one with light cabinets and/or gold fixtures/knobs. I agree some are too dark with dark floors, walls, and fabric.
     
  7. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    Albuquerque, NM
    Door knobs are pretty easy to change, so I wouldn't pass on a camper because of them. I didn't mind the look of the original ones in the Retro, but they were too shallow. After pinching my arthritic finger a few times, I started to look for replacements. I did pick pretty ones, which actually were among the most reasonable in cost, and the right size and shape.
     
  8. Morgan23

    Morgan23 Member

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    Feb 21, 2011
    I agree...we are in the process of looking for a new TT and all of them have such dark interiors! We have white cabinets at home in the kitchen and love them. Easy to see dirt and wash it off, looks more open. I wish more TTs had white (or light wood) interiors....I keep joking with DH that I am going to have to paint the brand new cabinets in our next TT!
     
  9. JustRelax

    JustRelax Member

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    Feb 20, 2013
    Indianapolis
    Knobs are easy, but faucets, door handles, other misc. trim pieces all would have to be changed possibly. I'm doing that to my house right now. Taking out old light maple with gold finishings and replacing with cherry/antique bronze. Nothing wrong with what was there - just dated. I feel the same walking into new campers like that - the camper is dated. I bet OP is correct in a few years there will be a new fad.
     
  10. jmh1007

    jmh1007 Member

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    Aug 25, 2014
    Our friends bought a big coach that is black on the inside. It's so dark! The furniture is all black, the backsplash is black. The floor is really dark. It's kind of depressing really. They said they got a good deal on it because of the color.
     
  11. WeRJuliIan

    WeRJuliIan If it's "Aluminum", why not "Sodum" and "Uranum"?

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    Sarasota, FL
    At a secret, well guarded location, the Illuminati of the Ancient Order Of RV Makers meet, don their secret regalia, exchange the secret handshakes, and debate weighty matters of the RV world...

    "OK, Brothers, we're going to make them all brown for a while, whether the buyers want it or not... because the Smart Young Men in the marketing office say it's a trendy idea, and... well, because we can.
    If We Build It... They Will Have to Buy It"

    ... and this is why the Lady From Little Rock is exercising her talents with a sewing machine. Our NTU Jayco is almost completely Brown, to the extent that you have to turn the lights on, in the daytime.

    Curtains, cushion covers, window valances, all are being reworked in a light blue or blue-white material, salvaged from the last PUP. We debated going crazy with a bucket of paint, but that may have to wait.

    Ian, The Man From Scotland
     
  12. generok

    generok Active Member

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    Feb 7, 2013
    Anchorage, AK
    It's just an extension of the home trend. Dark woods are in now, as are glass tile backsplashes, wood floors, "distressed" or "repurposed" wood. It's all a trend. Someday in the distant future, orange countertops and shag carpet will appear again. The brass, glass and oak of the 80's is where I tend to settle too, but, I have to admit, it looks a bit dated compared to today's trends. The best bet is to get ahead of the current trend and get in on the NEXT trend. Maybe pastel cabinets are next, or cast plastic with LED backlighting is the next hot thing, I don't know. But if it starts a trend in home DIY decorating, it will show up in RVs about 2-3 years later. Style is a way of date stamping something... as I sit in my house built in 1984, which looks distinctly 80's. My PUP was built in '94. It look 90's... oak "look" cabinets, abstract colors in the cushions, maroon curtains... so 90's.

    I'm thinking of painting my interior cabinets this season because after ANOTHER year of deferring on buying a TT, I intend to sell the PUP at the END of this season so I have no choice but to pop on the TT next spring. I figure it will have younger eyes not see my 23 year old PUP as so old if the cabinets aren't screaming late 80's oak "look" particle board.

    I agree though, I'm not a huge fan of the darker wood movement, but it's more just because I enjoy wood and like to see the grain. I don't think it makes the unit feel too dark... then again, we have 18-20 hours of daylight in camping season up here, so darkness is something we have to WORK to attain.
     
  13. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    Dec 26, 2009
    Albuquerque, NM
    Our first pup was a 1984 one, so arrived with dark cushions with a huge plaid, coarsely woven, fabric. The cabinets were the cheap and dark look, but the amount of light canvas was a big help. when we renovated it, I painted the cabinets and tiny bit of wall space off-white.
    The beige wall covering in the Retro is at least light, even if on the bland side. We've added a tile-look backsplash in the kitchen space. The current quilt is pretty dark, the ones in process are a bit lighter. The dinette cushions are gray and white vinyl. It's pretty light when we choose to sit inside. That partly depends on how many of the ceiling fixtures we turn on - with all 3 it is very bright, especially at the front where 2 are close together. Even with LEDs, we seldom have more than 1 on while dry camped, since we're used to conserving power.
     

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