Who prefers provincial/state type parks rather than campgrounds?

Discussion in 'General Camping Discussion Forum' started by KeatesCamping, May 17, 2019.

  1. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    Our state parks are expensive in comparison to other public campgrounds (up to $75 a night in some places) and they are very dog unfriendly. I don't stay there for the most part. Some are more built up than others, but I don't want or need all that development.

    So, I stick with my primitive federal campgrounds: a parking pad, a firepit, a picnic table, and maybe a bear box. And usually only two pit or vault toilets for every 6 - 10 campsites and a water spigot for every 3 - 5 campsites. Dogs are allowed on trails and in the water, etc. No bathhouses, stores, playgrounds, swimming pools, laundry facilities. Often not even a camphost.
     
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  2. tfischer

    tfischer Well-Known Member

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    To answer the original question, "who doesn't?" lol.

    That's why I'm so glad we don't have dependencies on an electric cord. MN state parks have only a small percentage of electric sites and they fill up a year in advance much of the time.
     
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  3. hometownhiker

    hometownhiker Active Member

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    Yep, woods camping is the place for us. We just say "no" to any and all parking-lot type of camping. We do lots of US Forest Service, National and State Parks. When we went to Canada, we stayed in your wonderful National and Provincial parks. We boondock as often as we can.
     
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  4. brwarrior

    brwarrior Active Member

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    It depends on my mood and what I'm looking for. I have classify places into three, maybe four classes.

    RV Park: Glorified parking lot. Paved, gravel, etc spot to park on. Table, grill, full hookups. Bathhouse and restrooms. Usually private. But I did stay in a County one in NV. It existed there as a support to the county owned facility. It was in the summer during the week when I stayed there. Maybe 2 or 3 other rigs (can accommodate over 50, 75' rigs). Probably wouldn't be popular with most pup crowd because they require full containment.

    Campground: Somewhere between RV park and and dispersed. Usually government (local, state, fed) owned. Kodachrome SP, UT is closer to the RV Park side. But they don't have full hookups everywhere. Spots (excepts tents) are on asphalt either pull through or turnouts. Campgrounds will generally have spaces that are marked or defined in some way. Generally paid, but not always. The campground itself is defined. You can camp here. In this area. Not over there though. Many of the CA OHV Parks (technically a State Vehicle Recreation Area) are more to the dispersed side of the spectrum. Some have campgrounds that you have to camp in, but generally not certain spots. Shade structures and fire rings but you might end up with a group of three trailer and 4 tents packed in together. Then there's Oceano Dunes SVRA (aka Pismo Dunes). 1500 acres (and slowly being closed down) of sand. Most camping is on 2-3 miles of beach. They have pit toilets. And a few scattered port-a-potties. For like $25-30 you can stay at a close by SP with full hookups that resembles for of an RV park than a campground.

    Dispersed (USFS/BLM term) aka Boondocking: You're on your own. Pack it in, Pack it out. Maybe you'll find a pit toilet that may or may not be serviced. There are may or may not be restrictions (i.e. camp withing a certain distance of a road 30', 100', 300'.) Request to use existing spaces, fire rings, etc. Just be responsible and not ruin it for everyone else.

    I got spoiled here when I first started camping. The OHV Division of State Parks is only $10/night for camping, $6/day use. At any park. You can get a day use pass specific to the OHV system. I was floored paying $20-$25 per night at a government campground. $50 a night for an RV park? Are you kidding me?! At least the one private one I stayed at their 49.95 per night, or whatever it was, was inclusive of everything, including taxes!
     
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