“Friendly” raccoons, need a deterrent

Discussion in 'Camping Around Wildlife' started by hmhheather, Jun 12, 2020.

  1. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member

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    Do you realize how toxic moth balls are?
     
  2. Mitchell Porter

    Mitchell Porter New Member

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    Animals don't like the smell of mothballs, so they won't hang out long enough to eat them. And if they are ground up into a mealy powder, they dissipate in a couple of days. There's a product called Snake-Away that is basically what they sweep up at the moth ball factory, but it's cheaper to make yourself.
     
  3. Bob Sandlak

    Bob Sandlak New Member

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  4. Bob Sandlak

    Bob Sandlak New Member

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    I use Cyanne pepper. Not spelled correctly. Works for bears and other critters. Sprinkle on garbage or on ground around campsite. It messes with their. Ability to smell food.
     
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  5. Bob Sandlak

    Bob Sandlak New Member

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    I go to a Dollar Tree Store and buy Cyanne pepper and sprinkle it around campsite....problem solved.
     
  6. Bob Sandlak

    Bob Sandlak New Member

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    You can't tell one from the other as they are masks.....
     
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  7. Bob Sandlak

    Bob Sandlak New Member

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    My nephews gave me some barbecued, and I was amazed how good it was. I usually don't do exotic food, but it was good.
     
  8. mike Behrend

    mike Behrend New Member

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    In the state of Michigan it's illegal to trap and relocate racoons, once their trapped the have to by law be distroyed. So short of that the rangers arnt going to do much other than maybe start issuing tickets. I'd personally go to your local farm store and buy deer and raccoon deterrent that's made to be sprayed around your garden and hopefully that helps.
     
  9. Leslie Chasse

    Leslie Chasse New Member

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    Get a dog, or two.
     
  10. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    If you take issues with my numbers, then check them for yourself.
     
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  11. Lisa Busch

    Lisa Busch New Member

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    I remember camping at a provincial park in Ontario when I was younger, when the RVs that had AC units had them on the side, the raccoons there were particularly tough and pulled one of those AC units out of the RV in order to get into the RV!!:shocked: The rangers put out a live trap and relocated the 'coons to an area of woods further away from the campgrounds and that solved the problem, but it sounds like the rangers here were not that well versed in this sort of thing. Sad. |

    Raccoons get used to humans, and their food. One of the state parks here had such a problem with them, but had not yet figured out they needed to switch to centralized garbage containers that have the locks animals can't get in to...they had the big, old heavy metal garbage cans throughout the campground. Now, we are night people, and like sitting around the campfire late, so we would be up when the rest of the campground have tucked in, and sure as shooting, we would hear one of those heavy metal lids go "clang"....we heard the one near our site rattling (they were strapped to trees or poles to keep from being knocked over) and quick, flashed our flashlights in that direction...and saw garbage can, and 2 sets of glowing eyes above it, looking back at us. Smart little buggers were working on getting that lid off.

    Our most recent "adventure" with wildlife was a local park, we "scored" the one campsite that was waterside and we could kayak directly from the site, rather than having to take our 'yaks down the road. Only to discover THAT campsite was the favorite site of the Canadian Geese.

    In the morning, the thick layer of goose dung we had not really noticed when we set up camp that was actually all over the site (we saw some of the fresher droppings over near the shore) became moist with the morning dew and STUNK!! Add to that, in the evening, the geese showed up, they were very respectful, it was a big site, they kept their distance, but they added to the goose dung..each new addition was the size of what a small to medium size dog would leave!!! We didn't walk inside out trailer without taking off our shoes that entire weekend, and our shoes got washed when we got home.

    I'm all for wildlife and allowing them their space, but that and the $15 daily charge per boat to kayak, we never went back (Private lake, Cove Lake State Park in TN....too many other places to kayak for free around here, that's too steep for our liking, and too shallow a lake).
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2020
  12. BillyMc

    BillyMc Well-Known Member

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    Raccoons are far from defenseless. For those with dogs, please don't let them tangle with a coon! A grown coon can easily injure or even kill a fairly large dog.
     
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  13. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

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    Many of our states have made a mess of the wildlife population, which in many cases goofed up the ecosystems of the parks. My thoughts are the coons are overpoulated in that MI park. One of my favorite SP to go too in the late 80's - early 90's was Brown county State Park. They had all kinds of dear that would come right in the CS. My little kids just loved it. It was a parent's dream to have their kids watch the deers, and to see their eyes get big as saucers. The 10's of thousand acre park was built in the 1930's and had no hunting since the 30's. But the park had a problem, the ecosystem was going upside down because of the overpopulation of the dears. READ ABOUT THE PARK ISSUE in 1993 Just last month I was camping at Brown County State park and talking to one of the rangers he said the ecosystem was still very out of wack and will be that way for many more decades.

    So I think the department of natural resources has a responsivity to try to maintain the ecosystem of the parks. If trapping or hunting is needed to keep the system in balance, lets do it. Now maybe the coons are not overpopulated it's just the bad habits of the visitors created. We saw that issue with yellowstone back in the 60's with the bears in the campground. The park started trapping and relocating the bears and educating the visitors. So I fell the issues is with the department of natural resources not addressing the issues, and blowing it off as the coons were here long before this was a park. Do what your paid to do manager the natural resources.
     
  14. Matt D Wilder

    Matt D Wilder New Member

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    My dog loves raccoons! He is a little like 007 he prefers them shaken not stirred. Check you local game and fish laws and proceed accordingly. Who wants a ticket for pepper spraying coons? A well bred hunting dog is the only real answer. I can leave anything out for the week as long as Otto is around it ain't going anywhere. I do only camp at remote dispersed sites so he is usually off leash. My only worry is skunks. That can make for a long ride home!
     
  15. sandreas

    sandreas New Member

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    Years ago, my family had a local camping trip planned. Since I had to wait for the kids to get out of school, my husband brought the camper to the campsite ahead of us. When I arrived, he wasn’t at the site so I let myself into our locked popup to set things up. I was happily surprised that he had taken care of the inside too but as I looked around, I just kept thinking, “What was he DOING in here?!” Things just looked disheveled and out of place. Not a complete mess but just, “off.” Drawers slightly ajar, food was out on the counters, and the floor was a mess, etc. Then it hit me, I was seeing bread crumbs all over the floor. The plastic drawers that we used were partially opened and filled with eight, yes EIGHT, packages of half eaten hamburger and hot dog buns. Why just two or three buns from each and every bag, I’ll never know. A bag of extra long Twizzlers that I was saving for the kids had a tear in the corner. One Twizzler was pulled partway out with one little bite taken out of it. I guess strawberry wasn’t the preferred flavor. But the kicker was the can of peanuts that had the lid still on! The foil seal had been peeled back, but then the lid replaced to keep the remaining five peanuts fresh. I thought that was very polite. After taking all of that in, I noticed the tiny footprints COVERING every inch of counter space. And they led me to my daughter’s bed where our little friend had left a puddle directly in the middle of her sleeping bag. Thank goodness for whatever water resistant material THAT thing was made of! After a thorough cleaning and a sleeping bag that was thrown in a bag for the laundry or the trash, (I honestly don’t remember which,) I discovered how our guest managed to get into a locked camper. The tiniest corner of the canvas secured by Velcro by the door was pulled away. A space that you wouldn’t believe a raccoon could get in and back out of. (And certainly not a raccoon that had just had THAT kind of feast!) I swear, just like that can of peanuts, he must have tried to secure that canvas back down when he left. He watched us from a tree for the next four days of that trip, I’m sure, just hoping that I’d replace those peanuts.
     

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