2005 Fleetwood Yuma Ceiling Repair Questions

Discussion in 'Roof/Floor Repair & Maintenance' started by Brian Stone, Aug 12, 2019.

  1. Brian Stone

    Brian Stone New Member

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    I am new to this site and new to popups. (Sorry if I am doing this wrong or breaking post etiquette). Please let me know). I got a great deal on a 2005 Fleetwood Yuma because the PO did not have the time or energy to fix a leak around the AC. Other than this, the camper is in great shape. The floor is solid. Canvas barely has any staining from the leak. He took good care of it.

    I’ve been reading posts on here for a few days, and it sounds like this is a really common issue. I’ve read several strategies folks have used, and given that I’m pretty handy, I’m confident that I can get this lil buddy in tip top shape. Not, however, without some help from you more experienced popup repairers.

    From what is visible, it appears only the rear half of the ceiling is bad. Already have much of the luan pealing away. The front half of the ceiling appears to be in great shape. Again, that’s what is visible. When I press on the styrofoam in the back, bad half, there is no moisture. It’s been under a tarp for a while, so may have dried out.

    So I am unsure if I should do what so many recommend and take the top off. I’m not sure if I should remove all of the styrofoam on the bad half and check the aluminum shell, or if I should just pull the AC, check the aluminum around it, seal the area around it, and replace the gasket. Remove the rest of the luan from the styrofoam and add a new layer.

    As you can see in the pics, the typical sag from a too heavy AC unit is where the water got in. It needs more support, but if the styrofoam is still good, I’d hate to take it all out.

    Will I need to remove it all in order to create the necessary support?

    All of the threads I have read have been for full roof rebuilds. I’ve got a partial, I think, and I don’t want to create unnecessary work. But I also don’t want more damage and to have to do it again.

    What do you guys think?

    I am sharing some pics now, and I will document and share the entire process. The posts on here have been super helpful!

    Thanks!
     

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  2. GreyFox

    GreyFox Well-Known Member

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    Easy for me to say ;) but removing the roof for a complete rebuild would certainly be the best approach as you sure wouldn't want to do a partial repair then later find yourself doing this all over again. :eek: This of course assumes you have a dry area where you can work on the roof without any concern for the weather.
     
  3. Brian Stone

    Brian Stone New Member

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    Ahh this is what I’m afraid of. I’ve read that getting the dry foam from the aluminum is a struggle, and even the rough spots are now dry, even if they weren’t at one point.

    Why I think you may be right is that Fleetwood (Coleman) screwed up the support for these massive AC units. The ceiling needs to be reinforced in any case.

    I’d love to hear from someone who has done a successful partial rebuild, with the roof on or off.

    I’ve got the spot to do it, sorta. 2 car garage in south western Indiana. It might be tight, but it’s doable for a winter project. An excuse to drink beer in the garage.

    I’d love to get this thing in proper condition without a massive winter project but, in this case, I will succumb to peer pressure. I realize that once I dig into the ceiling things might be worse than they appear.
     
  4. lksdrinker

    lksdrinker Active Member

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    I'd try to take that roof off and flip it whether you only rebuild half of the roof or the whole thing. I attempted to rebuild half the interior of my roof and while I did remove the roof first, I did not flip it upside down. I didnt have enough manpower, so I built a scaffold of sorts to support the roof while off of the pup. While all good in theory it was a huge pain to devise a way to clamp up my new work and fight against gravity. In the end gravity won, my repair sucks and now the roof bows in, and I bought another camper anyway.
     
  5. Brian Stone

    Brian Stone New Member

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    Thanks for the advice guys. I’m thinking that this winter I may as well just go for it. I have a few buddies who have offered to help, so we should be able to get it safely to my garage floor. It will be tight, but I can make it work for both the roof and the pup.

    The more I have read about trying to do this kind of job, even halfway, above your head, it sounds like it would be a good workout if you’re being optimistic haha. My roof is bowed on the bad side already, so there needs to be modified support for this MASSIVE AC unit. It looks way to big for the camper, but we want to keep for frequent trips to the southwest.

    Even though the foam under the luan looks fine, it probably has to come out to fix the structural integrity around the AC. And then I suppose there could be surprises once I get in there.

    I’ve got a while before I start, and I’ll be camping this fall in dry conditions. I’ll keep looking for advice specific to the issues associated with doing only half a ceiling.
     

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