2006 Rockwood Premier 2317G - Full Rebuild

AMC

Member
Apr 7, 2020
70
South Georgia
You are courageous indeed! I think you are bang in with your title post "full rebuild". Folks have done the full rebuilds, but they often take longer than expected as further damage is found as the layers are peeled away. You can do it if you are super handy and have a lot of time/patience, but I think an 8 week timeline for a full rebuild is pretty ambitious. If I were you, I'd cut my losses and try and find something in better shape.
I agree! 😫
 

southern gal

Active Member
Jul 6, 2018
100
South Georgia
This is super fun to watch and you, by the way, are a great writer! Fun to read. Honestly just here to cheer you on. And encourage you to keep us posted. You're likely coming across stuff the vast majority of us will never see, but should know. Thanks again and good luck!
I agree - the OP is a great writer. I’m enjoying reading these updates.
 

tfurgeson

Member
Jun 22, 2019
10
SWEET MOTHER OF PERL... Dunner, you are my new hero.

I have a 2007 Rockwood Highwall that I had the exact same experience with, but I drove it back 8 hours to find out I had a partial lemon. I have kept tinkering with it and fixed my floor portions... all I can tell you is you can't do it wrong. You have made amazing progress... keep us posted on this project.
 

Dunner

Member
Mar 27, 2022
19
Canada
Nice work! I'm curious to know how challenging it was to remove the existing walls from the frame and what are you going to use to re-attach them?
Easier than anticipated!

Once the canvas, beds, roof, and cabinets, trim, and outside skins were removed (that part was a bit of effort, to be sure) - The walls on my unit were of questionable construction and clearly designed for optimized cost savings for the manufacturer (ugh!). The wall structures are made wood framing, in my case spruce/pine lumber, with a 3/16" thick veneer making the interior finished side of the wall. With the outside skin removed, I was able to simply remove the screws holding it to the floor. The original screws used were small (maybe #8?). There werent many of them, and a bunch of them were rusted away and no longer functioning. Some went through the floor deck into the metal frame below, others did not.

I plan to re-attached with adhesive and #12 self-tap screws. I plan to use a washer under the head of the screw to apply the clamping force of the fastener to a larger area. I'm confident this will exceed the original install in quality.
 

Dunner

Member
Mar 27, 2022
19
Canada
This is super fun to watch and you, by the way, are a great writer! Fun to read. Honestly just here to cheer you on. And encourage you to keep us posted. You're likely coming across stuff the vast majority of us will never see, but should know. Thanks again and good luck!
Well shucks - this is nice to read

I appreciate the positive comments and encouragement - it's great fuel to keep me motivated (not to mention the first camping trip of the year is 5 weeks out!)
 

Dunner

Member
Mar 27, 2022
19
Canada
I just recently rebuilt the roof on my Rockwood Premier. Its really not a bad job if you are handy. My left and right boards were rotted out but the front, rear, and top were fine. I used 1/2 OSB and white wall panels from Lowes. They are only 8' long so I had to lap joint the OSB and put a seam in the wall panels. The pebbled finish matches perfect with the rest of the roof. I used the smooth side out on the inside. For all the seams I used 1.5" Eternabond.
I might pick your brain further when I get to that step! Thanks for the details [:D]
 

Dunner

Member
Mar 27, 2022
19
Canada
My thought would be to make the thing usable for the season. Will it tow and will you not get wet while sleeping? If those boxes are checked then use it. Save the mahor repair work for next season and work on it over the winter. It won't be perfect this season, but it will still be better than sleeping on the ground and you won't have a ton of time/money invested. The kids won't notice a difference either way lol
Well I certainly appreciate the sentiment. There's certainly some wisdom in your words.

But that'd hardly be sporting! Wouldn't it?
 

PMac77

New Member
Oct 19, 2021
1
I'll be watching this thread with great interest. I have a very old pop-up (1990 Starcraft Starflyer), which, for sentimental reasons I'm hoping to hold onto for a while longer. It's served my family well for years, but it finally starting to show it's age and may need some serious TLC soon. Good luck and please keep sharing details as your rebuild progresses!
 

Shelley Wilson

New Member
Apr 8, 2021
4
Update:

Been in disassembly mode lately. Its interesting to learn how these things are put together. its been fun - lots of labeling as I go. I'm starting to get a good handle on where to pay special attention to sealing on the rebuild. Lots of water damage due to leaks around the roof vent, spare tire mount, and other openings. Looks like it'd be good practice to give these a once-over with a tube of sealant every year (obviously this wasn't done in my case).

View attachment 82214
View attachment 82215

Its amazing how much of these campers are held together with staples. Worse yet, the stapling is far from consistent. There will be like 12 staples along a 6 inch area, and then nothing fore 2 feet, and then one staple, then 2, then another 150.....and so on. No pattern to it, it just looks like the staple guy was drunk. Must have been built on a Friday before a long weekend! I'm a bit appalled at the overall build-quality of my pop-up, but this gives me confidence that I'll be able to improve upon its original condition during my rebuild.

View attachment 82217

I've got the camper stripped down to the bare frame now. The frame rail by the door area is bent (see picture with yellow bubble-stick as a reference) and will need to be straightened out. I plan on installing additional reinforcement in this area to keep this from happening again. Its really surprising how flimsy the metal frame is as a whole. Welds are really small and there aren't many of them. Lots of temptation to reinforce the frame with more steel in places but I also want to be careful about adding much more weight. At the very least I'll strengthen the step area as that will see regular loading and I'll give the whole things a repaint while were here.

View attachment 82213


Thinking ahead to plywood floor install:

My camper had 1/2" OSB, I plan to install 1/2" spruce plywood and join with lap joints and self-tap screws into the frame.

1. For those of you who have replaced floors before - did you coat the under-side of the floor decking? What did you use? I'm considering Spar Urethane or perhaps oil-based paint.
2. For the lap joints between the sheets of plywood - what sealant did you use? I'm thinking of construction adhesive (PL Premium) but wondered if I should use something more flexible since that stuff dries rock hard.

View attachment 82216

Thats it for now - next steps include frame reinforcement near the door step, strip down and re-paint the frame, and replace the decking! All tips and advice are welcome. Wish me luck :)

I replaced the four sodden, mouldy sides of the roof last spring/summer. Total beginner; took me many weeks, and I learned that applying caulk gracefully is a skillset I do not possess... however, it's functional and better than original. Like you I used marine grade ply, painted and varnished, instead of OSB.

If I had it to do over again, I would investigate replacing the fibreglass skin. It took an absolute *age* to scrape and clean the decomposed OSB, glue and silicone sealant off the fibreglass, and inevitably I created a couple of holes that then required epoxy. The metal trim pieces were time consuming to clean up too, but nothing like the fibreglass roof skin. I relied heavily on this fella's experience, and he was, bless him, helpful in answering questions:

Good luck!
 

Shelley Wilson

New Member
Apr 8, 2021
4
My thought would be to make the thing usable for the season. Will it tow and will you not get wet while sleeping? If those boxes are checked then use it. Save the mahor repair work for next season and work on it over the winter. It won't be perfect this season, but it will still be better than sleeping on the ground and you won't have a ton of time/money invested. The kids won't notice a difference either way lol
His problem is the lifting posts. If those fail, and it sounds like they well might, that would be a very bad thing.
 

DanZaw

Member
Jun 16, 2021
40
I did almost exactly what your doing now, same model as yours. Had to take out all the cabinets, heater, hot water heater, etc. Had to replace part of the floor because of a puncture on the roof, probably because of a falling tree branch. I bought that way knowing the damage and knowing I could rebuild it. The price was cheap, 3K. I did the entire floor with new vinyl from Home Depot and replaced the section of bad floor with the same OSB that was in it. Took apart the the whole lift system, cleaned it and re-greased it. Also bought all new canvases. I had to order a new section of counter top, the hinged section between the slide and the front bed, from the factory. I put it back up for sale before I got the counter top and sold the unit with new tires also for ninety eight hundred to the very first couple that looked at it. It looked like new inside and out. Shortly after they took it I got the new hinged counter top from the factory. If your in need of it let me know.
 

Reefluvr

New Member
May 22, 2019
6
Well shucks - this is nice to read

I appreciate the positive comments and encouragement - it's great fuel to keep me motivated (not to mention the first camping trip of the year is 5 weeks out!)
Hahaha - it looks like you have it well under control. Good to have mad handy skilz. [8D]
 

Michael J

Active Member
Aug 9, 2018
201
Michigan
I just recently rebuilt the roof on my Rockwood Premier. Its really not a bad job if you are handy. My left and right boards were rotted out but the front, rear, and top were fine. I used 1/2 OSB and white wall panels from Lowes. They are only 8' long so I had to lap joint the OSB and put a seam in the wall panels. The pebbled finish matches perfect with the rest of the roof. I used the smooth side out on the inside. For all the seams I used 1.5" Eternabond.
I'm doing my roof now the aluminum on the sides of the roof rim at the trim were rotted I picked up a roll of aluminum from Menards 24" x50' to redo the sides next warm days hopefully will start the reassemble I am using 1/2" osb for the perimeter rim
 

ChrisRN

New Member
Mar 28, 2022
4
Hey Folks

I'm new here - but I'm sure that one day, when this is all over, we'll all be well acquainted.

I purchased a well-loved and poorly cared-for 2006 Rockwood Premier about a week ago. It looked good from afar, but as it turns out, it's far from good. The previous owner purchased it mid-covid, realized he'd bought a lemon, and was now trying to turf it on to someone else.

I certainly didn't go in looking for a project. I was hoping to buy someone that was a bit more "ready-to-rock". This particular specimen was certainly priced that way. (Foreshadowing!)

When I pointed out to the previous owner that it had some severe signs of neglect and obvious damage, he was quick to offer it to me at a fraction of the list price (he wanted this thing: gone!). In many ways, I kind of wished I walked away at that point, but I was hopelessly naive and felt like I was getting a great deal despite the glaring issues. (You know, that darn surge of optimism you get when you're in buy-mode!). At this point, I still didn't fully grasp the extent of the damage, so we worked out a deal. The previous owner agreed to pack up the PUP for me, and I agreed to come back a couple hours later with my tow-vehicle to bring it home.

A short time later I returned, hooked up, and set-out for the 45-minute journey. It towed fine, but when I was nearly home, a freak-of-nature end-times sort of wind-gust came upon us, and blew the roof of the PUP on the passenger side about half way up. (Imagine my shock and awe seeing that in the rear-view!). I quickly pulled over to address the issue. The wind was so severe that I could barely pull it back down. Fearing that the whole thing might rip off and sail into the cornfield next to us, I used my entire body weight to pull it back down. In the process, the front-passenger side jack post broke right through the badly-rotted roof structure.

That got me worked up a bit. Nevertheless, I ratchet strapped that son-of-a-gun down, and proceeded with my journey. I checked the four roof latches pre departure and they were tight. It still escapes me how this could have happened. That said, due to the rot in the roof structure, it wasn't as rigid as it should be, and things might have "jiggled loose"

I pulled into the driveway full of shame and regret, asking myself the tough questions like: "How did I get here?" "How will I explain this to the wife?"

Once parked, I did some thinking. Real soul-searching kind of stuff. I remembered that broken things can, indeed, be fixed, so I proceeded to "The Google". I read epic tales about brave souls who succesfully re-built their roof structure, replaced floors, and completed full-on rebuilds.

It is here, next to a glass of whiskey, that I found my courage.

SO. Here we are. One lousy tent trailer, a small garage, and a crudely-conceived plan to make this thing "Better" (im setting the bar low)

Camping is booked for May 20th - That's 8 weeks to turn this thing around.

The wife and kids are counting on me.

...

Main issues as follow - any wisdom you folks can share along the way would be much appreciated. If you're interested in following along, I'll share as much of the process as possible. Maybe it'll help someone else out along the way.

1. Roof needs to be totally re-built and replaced. Considering trying to save the fiberglass roof skin, otherwise I'll spring from some EDPM or TPO
2. Lots of de lamination of the exterior side walls
4. Door doesn't latch properly and the door frame is pulling away. Something wierd going on with the floor below the door (pics)
3. Front wall skin is peeling away and needs to be re-attached
4. OSB (who thought OSB was a good idea?) floor is getting soft around the entire perimeter. Likely from the failed roof seals letting water in. Considering a full tear-down to replace.

Canvas and interior finishing looks decent though......
I love the progress you've made. I've got a '96 2306 that needs some love, ok a lot of love. I'm following your progress. Looks like it's going to be better than new!
 

Dunner

Member
Mar 27, 2022
19
Canada
Here's some update pics:


IMG_0102.jpg
New Plywood Decking - Lap joints between the sheets

IMG_0103.jpg
New Vinyl Flooring from Home Depot installed

IMG_0128.jpg
Now on to the wall structures - time to replace some rotten bits. I'm no carpenter, so we'll see how this goes! :shocked:
 

kcrouth

Member
Gold Supporting Member
May 3, 2015
78
Durham NC
i replaced some flooring and framing around the corners of our 2002 Coleman Mesa a few years back due to cracks in the plastic body panels and water damage. I used treated 1/2" ply for the floor sections (amazingly, only the 4 corners and the storage boot needed replacement, where the water got in). Also replaced rotten / compromised wall framing w/ treated boards i custom cut in the process, using the old boards as a pattern when it wasn't too rotted. Sealed up all the sources of water leak and damage. Also replaced most of the interior paneling in the front and back w/ real wood. And we replaced the vinyl flooring with a better grade. and a few other odds and ends.

I worked part time on it, mostly weekends during the spring - fall, in the driveway outside, and it took 2 years to complete (i'm slow, learned each step of the way). A lifesaver was 2 similar rebuilds posted here at PopupPortal w/ detailed photos. They gave me the insight i was missing from just tearing it apart and reverse engineering it.

We have been camping in it again for about 3 years and are loving it. Going to pull the A/C off the roof this season and replace with a MaxxFan, since we mountain camp and don't use the A/C. That should lighten the roof load by about 100 lbs.

Your project is very inspiring. Stick with it, the satisfaction when you are done is overwhelming, and you'll love your new popup.

kevin
 

David Condrack

New Member
Aug 31, 2021
6
I had to do a similar repair to part of the floor on my coleman cheyenne. I used Flex Seal Rubber Paint on the underside of the wood and along all seams. I also used treated plywood so moisture and rot should never be a problem at least in my lifetime. The Flex Seal went on very easily with roller and brush and had excellent adhesion. My repairs were done 3 years ago and I have taken my pup to Canada-4000 miles round trip, twice to Kentucky 1500 mile round trip, to Arkansas and to Missouri. I live in Oklahoma.
Hi Brian. Did you happen to use any of the flex seal on the ABS roof? I have a lot of spiderwebbing. No delamination yet. But was looking to use the flex seal paint to cover the whole thing.
 

kcrouth

Member
Gold Supporting Member
May 3, 2015
78
Durham NC
Hi Brian. Did you happen to use any of the flex seal on the ABS roof? I have a lot of spiderwebbing. No delamination yet. But was looking to use the flex seal paint to cover the whole thing.
I have some of the spiderwebbing starting on one side (the south facing side in storage) and was considering the flex seal paint also - let me know how it works out.
 

David Condrack

New Member
Aug 31, 2021
6
I have some of the spiderwebbing starting on one side (the south facing side in storage) and was considering the flex seal paint also - let me know how it works out.
Sure will. Plan on starting as soon as the weather in PA quits spazzing out….
 

brettstoner

Active Member
Jun 17, 2014
146
Toledo, OH
On a side note if you need parts from Forest River the prices are very reasonable. I only live a couple hours away and can drive there to pick them up. I usually email them and then call in with my credit card.
 




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