2008 Fleetwood Evolution 3 Sagging Ceiling & Needing Braces

GustheFish

Member
Jul 24, 2022
13
Thanks for the video and recommendation for RV Roof Magic. Looks like a winner!
My brother has an old shed/barn I can use now to put this in and work on the roof/ceiling. I think my goal now is to get in under cover, pop it up and dismantle the ceiling first. Then let it dry and glue up the insulation (supported all the way across so it shapes properly, then glue up thin plywood for the finish layer and install supports (and make a couple new ones). Then i'll seal the roof with RV Roof Magic (thanks @Matt S- ) while it's in its final shape.

@Mike Schlottman, we're west of Denver. And trying to NOT take the roof off. I know it ads some complexity for glueing and shaping, but, right now, I think I can make it work. Fortunately, there's no AC.
 

operationsguyseattle

Member
Silver Supporting Member
Jun 1, 2020
15
I have the same model and year. If your roof material looks like mine does in the photos, I think you have the same leaks.

I used Crazy Seal in grey and it has 100% fixed it. It took about a day including the prep. 2 gallons and I got two full coats. Looks great over a year later.

 

GustheFish

Member
Jul 24, 2022
13
@operationsguyseattle Thanks for this! That product looks great too. Our campers look very similar except that I *think* someone put something on my roof in the past as it looks more like a truck bed covering, but not as thick. The whole top is black and not super smooth like others. Also found a little piece pealing up that looks like it might be right to wood underneath? I'm guessing Crazy seal will work here too.
 

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operationsguyseattle

Member
Silver Supporting Member
Jun 1, 2020
15
How well attached is that black material? If it is largely well-adhered, I would feel comfortable putting the coating on top of it. If it's not, i think you need to remove it. (or at least the loose stuff) That system I used requires extensive and fairly specific cleaning prep. I was very careful and super thorough with the cleaning and prep. I did not need to use anything other than the paint - "Crazy Seal". No caulk, tape or patch. I used a cleaning solution for house painting - and did it twice with two rinses.

One thing that I found is that the CrazySeal grey is a lighter color than the OEM roof and was quite a bit cooler to the touch in direct sun. I could not walk on the roof barefoot with the OEM grey - it was no problem with the lighter grey of the coating. It should make a huge difference over that black stuff. Not only is the heat not great for the occupants in the summer, I think it also creates issues with the roof material as it gets superheated. (More expansion, more heat that can melt and damage adhesives etc.)

Good Luck
 

GustheFish

Member
Jul 24, 2022
13
@operationsguyseattle I think the black stuff is pretty well adhered to the filon (aluminum?), so I also think going right on top of it is good. I do feel spaces between the roof and the insulation underneath however. I'll take your advice and wash and prep it well before applying. Hard to imagine you actually walk on this roof?
Thanks!
Mark
 

operationsguyseattle

Member
Silver Supporting Member
Jun 1, 2020
15
Adhered is good. Keep inspecting and wash the daylights out of it. My concern was to get anything oily or organic off of it. I think I did a pass with Simple Green, then 30 Second Mold/Mildew remover, then a quick one with dish soap and a good rinse. My roof became frighteningly slippery with cleaning stuff on it - be careful.

I took the aluminum channels off of mine to paint. Are they loose? Push up on them in from the ground in the center of the roof. I took the screws out of the plastic corner pieces, removed them and was able to pull the aluminum up with ease. It made it easier to paint and I was also able to inspect the tape seal on the transition from horizontal to vertical. As far as that "decorative slotted channel" - I do not trust them to hold anything past solar panels. When i carry a canoe, I strap it to the frame of the trailer. I would never, ever trust it with a bike.

I am able to walk on mine (@200lbs). Generally, I will only do it barefoot and carefully. There are some softer feeling spots in the center that I try to stay away from.

Filon is a fiberglass sheet. All Fleetwood owners wish it was aluminum! (it would still be intact)
 

GustheFish

Member
Jul 24, 2022
13
More good info for sure. Thank you! I will say that being in CO at 8000 feet is probably a bit different than Seattle for moisture, mold and mildew. Thankfully, we don't get much of that since it's typically so dry up here. but I will definitely wash it well. And investigate the channels and corner pieces (I have a couple that are broken and might have to repair them a bit). I also figure the "decorative slotted channels" are definitely going to be for decoration only.
 

GustheFish

Member
Jul 24, 2022
13
Hey all, hoping you're still with me. Been working on this but had to take a few weeks off. Update. Got the roof covered with 2 coats of Crazy Seal, pricey yes, but also guaranteed. After 3 washings of the roof, it went on pretty easy. Thicker than pain, obviously, so it took more to coat everything. And I jsut covered everything to make sure any gaps in seams were covered.

Then I started taking the ceiling off. Decided to wear a respirator because of any mold or anything. Mostly it came off pretty easily, which is probably a bad sign. Then, inspecting the underside of the roof, the hail damage became super obvious. So, I took a rubber sealant that I used for other seams on the outside and smeared it all over the inside of each crack from the hail. it's been out in the rain and no leaks!

Then I started fitting the purple 1" insulation panels and then took a covid break.

Anyway, that's where I am now, about to contact cement the insulation panels to the ceiling. I'm uploading a bunch of pictures so you can see what I found. This would be easier upside down on ground, of course, but that ain't happening.

2 questions.

1. I've seen others use metal flashing over the insulation seams. Good to do? Required?

2. What panels does anyone use for the exposed, finished ceiling? I'm thinking this needs to have a waterproof barrier on the inside to make sure no moisture gets through, so that means not just wood panels. And something like a shower wall, wouldn't let me screw things into it for the Shoilet curtain or things like that. been looking around, but not finding what I think I need. Would love anyone's ideas.

Thanks!

Mark
 

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kumasan

New Member
May 7, 2022
6
Hey all, hoping you're still with me. Been working on this but had to take a few weeks off. Update. Got the roof covered with 2 coats of Crazy Seal, pricey yes, but also guaranteed. After 3 washings of the roof, it went on pretty easy. Thicker than pain, obviously, so it took more to coat everything. And I jsut covered everything to make sure any gaps in seams were covered.

Then I started taking the ceiling off. Decided to wear a respirator because of any mold or anything. Mostly it came off pretty easily, which is probably a bad sign. Then, inspecting the underside of the roof, the hail damage became super obvious. So, I took a rubber sealant that I used for other seams on the outside and smeared it all over the inside of each crack from the hail. it's been out in the rain and no leaks!

Then I started fitting the purple 1" insulation panels and then took a covid break.

Anyway, that's where I am now, about to contact cement the insulation panels to the ceiling. I'm uploading a bunch of pictures so you can see what I found. This would be easier upside down on ground, of course, but that ain't happening.

2 questions.

1. I've seen others use metal flashing over the insulation seams. Good to do? Required?

2. What panels does anyone use for the exposed, finished ceiling? I'm thinking this needs to have a waterproof barrier on the inside to make sure no moisture gets through, so that means not just wood panels. And something like a shower wall, wouldn't let me screw things into it for the Shoilet curtain or things like that. been looking around, but not finding what I think I need. Would love anyone's ideas.

Thanks!

Mark
About the underside aluminum damage, I opted for a different approach. An alternative to the rubber sealant is to use "bondo hair" which is a body putty with fiberglass strands. You can apply it thin and use wax paper to make it smooth, then just peal off the wax paper when it hardens. This is what I used for my restore to reinforce a few places of weak aluminum. Will see how it holds up.

About sealing on the inside, I think you dont actually want it to be sealed to hold water. Having it be permeable so that if it leaks it will come through (and you will know if it leaks instead of storing the water). I think plywood sheets perhaps attached with locktite PL premium adhesive. The PL premium did not seem to melt the foam like some other glues might. Might be a little harder to do with the top in place as you need to hold the foam in place while adhesive sets. Can paint the plywood with latex house paint, perhaps some orange peal texture underneath.

Good luck with your build.
 

GustheFish

Member
Jul 24, 2022
13
Thanks @Kumason, appreciate the input. I like the fiberglass body putty idea. I'll remember that for next time. I'm using this contact cement recommended earlier, the Fastbond 30NF, https://amzn.to/3TOLbjC . It shouldn't melt the polystyrene panels... 🤞🏻 I was also thinking of plywood panels and paint them as you suggested. I think easier to find too. We've had rain and snow and snow melt and no leaks so far, so I really think this Crazy Seal is gonna hold up. I'm hoping to get it all in tomorrow, assuming it's warm enough (6" of snow yesterday), but it should be. Will post pictures later. Thanks!!
 

GustheFish

Member
Jul 24, 2022
13
For those of you waiting with baited breath on my progress, I've had to put it on hold for the winter because it barely gets warm enough here for the contact cement, and I have no place indoors to do it. Cue the hold music....
 




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