30a-only sites common?

Discussion in 'Power - Site Power/Batteries/Generators/Solar' started by SpecialGreen, Jan 17, 2021.

  1. SpecialGreen

    SpecialGreen Member

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    What percentage of campsites, or what kinds of sites have you noticed with only 120v 30A service, versus sites with 240v 50A?

    I see sites listed online as "with electric service," but often don't see specifics (sometimes there are pictures of the power pole, which is helpful).
     
  2. SteveP

    SteveP Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    Most of the state parks in TX have 30 and 20 amp service, some of the newer loops may have 50 but I've never noticed. 50 amp service seems to be limited to private campgrounds and RV resorts around here.
     
  3. generok

    generok Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    20190629_204633.jpg
    It's often safe to assume if a site has "power" and nothing specific listed, it WILL have 20A, and probably has 30A. Never assume 50A service unless it specifically says 50A (and that usually costs more). I have only been to one private campground where the 50A site ONLY had 50A, but I just adapted down. But, I can hardly recall going to a powered site that didn't have both 20A and 30A... well, ONE, but that was in Chicken, Alaska, and the CG ran on genny power, so that doesn't count. There were only TWO of us in the Chicken CG that night, and do you want to know WHY we're right next to each other??? Because it was 90 degrees that day and those are the ONLY two 30A sites in the park! [LOL][LOL]
     
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  4. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    If a site has 50 amp (50 amp, it's not 240 volts alike stove and dryer supply), it generally has 20 and 30 too. Many places we go have 20/30 amp. I've had one site a couple of times in a campground that, for some reason, only has 20 and 50 amp, so I used the 50 amp with a "dog bone" adapter. I carry adapters because they come in handy, so I can plug into any of the above, with my 30 amp TT (our pup was 30 amp too)
     
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  5. A-Ranger12

    A-Ranger12 Active Member

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    If it's a NY state park with electricity, it's 30 amp 120v unless it's specifically marked 50 amp. Private campgrounds can vary. One campground in Old Forge is notorious for having electricity but not allowing air conditioner use. Which is the point, lol.
     
  6. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah Gold Supporting Member

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    Where I camp 90% of the campgrounds I stay at range between no power to 30 amp. I rarely see 50 amp. Then again I avoid areas that bigger rigs go. Most campgrounds that offer 30 amp also have 20 on the same pole. Same goes for a 50 amp I can usually find bothe 20 and 30 amp as well on the power post.
     
  7. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member Silver Supporting Member

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    It's my understanding that there is 240 volt potential in the campground pedestal receptacle. The RV is wired to use two 120 volt legs of the circuit, going to different sides of the distribution panel. All you see in the RV is 120 volts, unless you use the two hot circuit legs which has the 240 volt potential. I didn't draw the example, but it's mainly for the pedestal 14-50R wiring.
    [​IMG]
     
  8. silvermickey2002

    silvermickey2002 Morris County, NJ Gold Supporting Member

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    We have camped all over and I have not seen a 50A only site. I have seen 20A/30A sites as well as 30A/50A sites. We have stayed on sites where it was only a 20A tent site. I just used the dog bone adapter. I have spoken to CG owners and during conversations they told me the business decision to have a 50A only site just didn't make sense for them. That's why they have sites with both 30A and 50A. Now I can see those CGs that cater to only Class "A" rigs having only 50A sites.
     
  9. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    @WrkrBee
    I was simplifying. There are some who mistake the 50 amp receptacle as being the same as a home dryer or stove, and try to plug in those at home. Not good.

    So far, I have never had a 50 amp only site, in most cases, the column has all three. One reason I carry a dog bone adapter is so I can use the 50 amp outlet is not in great shape. I had it just in case, but using the 50 amp if the30 amp is worn has been suggested on a couple of owner' and other forums I've read. The idea is that 30 amp is the more common rating for campers of all types, so it sees the most use. I was glad I had it the first time I was faced with the campsite that only has 20 and 50 amps. (The office has an adapter to loan for those who do not have their own.)

    if in doubt, if possible, call the campground for details.

    Most of the time, we dry camp, so I'm sure there are many more odd set-ups we have yet to encounter.
     
  10. rabird

    rabird Howdy!

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    more and more I'm seeing upgraded to 120/240 50A in TX SP

    https://www.myrv.us/electric/
    "This is a typical Campground Service. Note the width of the breakers. Number 1 is double wide for a 120/240 volt 50amp service. The (#2) 30amp and (#3) 20amp are 120 volt with Single Pole Breakers."

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. Wakita46

    Wakita46 Active Member

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    Having used my Aliner in most states I would say most have 30 amp and a much smaller number have 50 amp. Those that handle the bigger rigs will have 50 amp (air conditioner alone pulls a lot of amps.) Only the older cheaper places have only 20 amp so it is not common. However, in Canada (British Columbia to Nova Scotia), 50 amp is not common and in some regions 20 amp is about all you will get. hoffsalinertravels.net
     
  12. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    One reason for a lack of a firm answer is that there are so many variations - from type of campground, private, or any number of public ones, age of the power systems, some change over ht eyears as upgrades are done, etc. Some state and national forest campgrounds that we've used over the last 30+ years have been adding power, often 20/30 amp. Not only are we prepared with adapters in case the power column only has 20 or 50 (only 50 yet to be encountered, but I'm sure it's out there), we are prepared with RV extension cords. Especially in places where power has been added years after the campground was built, location of the box can be a bit interesting - on the wrong side of the trailer, or at the far end of the site. At one USFS campground we've stayed in a few times, it looks as though someone simply struck a line from the main power source, and whichever sites it hit, and wherever in them it hit, that was where the power column was installed. That meas some of the less than attractive sites have power. The one site we had with it had the power column at one end of a fairly lengthy pull-through.
     
  13. SpecialGreen

    SpecialGreen Member

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    Thanks for the helpful replies! I have an uncommon reason: we'd like to camp with our Chevy Bolt electric car, and we can get further out into nice country if we can recharge at the campsite before we head back.

    The Bolt has a unique "anti-feature": it will happily take 32A at 240v to recharge, but as soon as it sees 120v, it will refuse pull any more than 12A (because Chevy was worried people would start fires in their garages). So a 30A 120v power pole at a campsite has plenty of juice for a quick recharge, but the Bolt will refuse to use even half of it.
     
  14. Jimbow

    Jimbow Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. My son has a Tesla and needed a receptacle installed in his garage.
     

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