5 year old tires/bearings? Replace???

Discussion in 'Tires / Brakes / Bearings / Axles' started by leejuokas, Jun 25, 2012.

  1. leejuokas

    leejuokas New Member

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    I just bought a 1985 Coleman Royale.
    The tires look great but the previous owner said they are about 5 years old.
    The spare is really old and cracked.

    Should I get new tires? Maybe take one of the existing tires and make it the spare and get 2 new ones?
    Any suggestions for tire brands?

    BTW, what tire pressure do you run your tires at?
    These are a max of 90 psi?

    Maybe I should get new bearings also. Is there a chart/app to help order bearings?

    THanks,
    Lee
     
  2. BigDan

    BigDan A bad day camping beats a good day at work

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    tires are lost most often to rotting rather that wear. i would look at the tire inbetween the tread and see if it is cracking at all, if so i would replace them if it is in the budget.

    wheel bearings can be packed and repacked as long as they are not pitted, rusted, discolored, or loose. they should have a number on the back side of the bearing housing and your local parts store should be able to look it up and get the right part for you.
     
  3. cwolfman13

    cwolfman13 Active Member

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    I would get new tires....5 years is about right where they should be replaced regardless of wear. In RE to the bearings, it just depends. If they're in good shape, not necessary. I'd pull them and if they're good, just re-pack them.

    In RE to tire pressure, it also just depends on the tire. You want to get a tire that fits, from a size standpoint, but also rated for your p'ups weight (GVWR less the gross tongue).
     
  4. warwgn3

    warwgn3 Car Shows are 2nd only to Camping!

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    Just stumbled across this thread.

    I wanted to ask how often I should have my bearings repacked? I last had them repacked when I was in the last stages of restoring/rebuilding my camper. I cant tell you how many Miles/Kilometres it has been since then, but I know it has been more than 4 years since it was done last.

    Also, wanted to know if I actually have to take the hubs apart and re & re the bearings, or whether I can just use a grease gun to push out the old grease, while pumping in fresh grease using the nipples in the grease caps.

    On the subject on tire replacement, I would guess that most people can't remember or don't know when their tires replaced last. Such was the case with my last set of tires.

    When I replaced them this past April, I grabbed a black permanent marker, and wrote the installation date on the new rim/tire sets before I mounted them on the axle.
     
  5. Flyfisherman

    Flyfisherman New Member

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    Dexter Axle calls for repacking and bearing inspection every 12, 000 miles or annually. I've known (and have myself) let it go two years with light use and few miles.
     
  6. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    Tires, yes replace. Since you are taking the word of the previous owner as to when the bearing were last serviced, my suggestion would be to have them done now; not that the PO is not being honest, but often people rely on memory for things like that.

    We learned - the hard way - with the previous pup to not rely on estimating mileage on tires, after having a blow out on one. We now have a dedicated spiral notebook, kept in the TV glove box (so it is easy to find and access), for pup-related maintenance. We record mileage to/from each camp site, as well as when bearings are done, etc.
     
  7. Unstable_Tripod

    Unstable_Tripod Well, there's your problem!

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    I also recommend replacing the tires and repacking the bearing. Then you are off to a fresh start and know what you have.
     
  8. mr pep

    mr pep Member

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    By law a tire cannot be sold by a tire shop after 7 years of its date of manufacture. I use this as a refference - but if your tires are cracking then maybe that is a sign that your tires were either in harsh elements or the are older then you think. There is a number on the tire and I believe it is the last 2 numbers that are code to the year they were made. As far as repacking bearings I can not give any advice there - I guess repack as neeeded.
     
  9. itfchaos

    itfchaos New Member

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    Check for cracks on the side wall, you see any, replace it.
    Also check for a DOT stamp on the side wall, this will help you determine the date of the tire. Make sure it is really 5 years or older. Regardless of age, if you see any cracks on side wall, replace it.


    I repack my bearings every other year. I only camp locally within 200 miles (round trip) about 4 to 6 times a year (800 to 1200 miles a year).
    I never had any issues out of all my trailers doing this. If I ever planned on going cross country that would be different, I would repack more often.
     
  10. Mr_Custom

    Mr_Custom Member

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    Like others here I remove, clean and repack the bearings every two years. Last year I found some discolouration on one set of bearings so I replaced the bearings kit on that side. I always keep a spare set so that I don't have to go searching in the middle of a job. If it was an off year and I was planning a long trip ie >600 miles I believe I would pull and check them adding grease as required.
     
  11. papachaz

    papachaz New Member

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    don't go by 'just check for cracks' because sometimes you can't see them. i put new tires on my TT back in April. my dear son in law just couldn't understand why i was replacing tires that looked so good. they were the orginal tires from when it was new, 2003. he went with me to pick the TT up at the tire shop. the guy showed us how rotted the beads were. below the rim where they couldn't be seen, you could just about stick a finger through. after that he didn't question it again, LOL as a matter of fact, having seen that it was easy to get him to change the tires on his horse trailer.

    find the date code, it will be a 4 digit number, the first two are the week, the second two are the year. if they're older than five years, they should be changed. here's a link to a page that shows how to read it:
    http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=11

    if you're taking it in to have them changed, have them check and pack the bearings and check the seals. it won't be much per tire to have it done, then you have peace of mind
     
  12. BajaPup

    BajaPup New Member

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    Buy new tires and at least inspect and repack the bearings. My local trailer shop sold me two seals and four bearings with races for $50. For that price, I didn't have to worry about the last guy's service regimen while decending the Rockies.

    OR

    Let it ride. When a bearing fails, it heats up the hub, which further weakens a rotting tire. You'll know it's time to change tires and service the bearings when you feel a sharp tug from the rear of your tow vehicle.
     
  13. jb3pin

    jb3pin New Member

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    The common thread is to replace the tires, which is a wise choice and the safest one too. A blow out from an old tire is not only dangerous but costly; it's also potentially more challenging to find certain replacement parts for a Coleman. I've thought through it all myself since I not only have five year old tires but also a Fleetwood.

    From my own visual inspection of my tires I could not detect any defects, but as it was already stated not all defects may be visible. I chose to take it into a local tire shop. I also had wanted to swap out the valve stems from rubber to stainless. Another common source of trailer blowouts are rubber valve stems from years of UV etc.

    I specifically asked the shop to make a thorough visual evaluation of the tires when removing them from the rims, particularly because the same model in a different size had been recalled.

    Nonetheless with the hope that the technician was correct I elected to keeping running these tires for a while.

    Might be another route to consider, especially if you have rubber valve stems.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
     
  14. mr pep

    mr pep Member

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    When I bought my pup my tires were 18 years old and had cracks and I managed to drive the pup home. I replaced right away but it gives me the idea that tiresarestronger than we think. But safety is most important and it they are too old - replace.
     
  15. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    We got home on the original tires when we bought the old pup too, but only traveled a few miles across town. Having experienced both the entire wheel flying off (several things contributed, but a torque wrench is now in the tool kit) and a blow out last year, we're determined to do everything we can to reduce the possibility of having either experience ever again. We also live and camp in a harsh environment - high altitude (means more UV exposure), arid climate and hot temperatures can all contribute to issues with tires (OTH, we don't have as many issues with mildew as some do, though did encounter some in the rebuild of the previous pup).
     
  16. Flyfisherman

    Flyfisherman New Member

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    They are ... and they are not.

    Had old tires on the boat trailer that's parked right in the sun keep on keeping on; of course, it only travels a very short distance. Yet on the other hand had an almost brand new tire on the p'up separate right in the tread and had it not been for seeing it before a long trip the tire would have surely blown. Maybe it has to do with the original construction(?)
     
  17. RFryer

    RFryer Hopkinton, MA

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    Same problem here, we have an '07 model where the tires seem to be in great shape. We've always kept covers on them for the year we had it and I think the PO kept it in a carpot. But, we have a long trip to MN coming up in a few weeks so I probably should replace them. Technically the tires are even older, 6 years I think according to the tire stamp.
     
  18. Stardust_8

    Stardust_8 New Member

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    We also pulled our 1986 P'UP 95mi from PO's house to ours, on it's original tires, June 14th. We replaced them last week.
     
  19. Mixon

    Mixon New Member

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    If you're even asking do it now under circumstances you control.

    It really stinks changing a tire on the side of the interstate with semis blowing by at 80 and a car full of kids and gear on a Sunday.
     
  20. warwgn3

    warwgn3 Car Shows are 2nd only to Camping!

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    I wonder if anyone makes a tire cover for 8" camper tires. My rolling tires are somewhat hidden, and are ok, but my spare is weather cracked because it is completely exposed to direct sunlight. I've been thinking that I should find a way to cover it somehow.
     

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