a frame vs popup camper

Discussion in 'A-Frame PopUps' started by HAWKEYE71, Dec 30, 2019.

  1. Flyboyonyoursix

    Flyboyonyoursix New Member

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    A frame camper. Do yourself a favor....
     
  2. dave123

    dave123 freedom is not just another word

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    to me the aframe is a strong three season home the other two season splitting first half of winter and last half of spring
     
  3. Lonewolf55

    Lonewolf55 Going NoWhereFast

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    An Aframe with an Electric Campsite is comfy down to zero. Just plug in a little electric heater and stay toasty. But don't trust your water system to survive, the water pump is too isolated and the filter housing will freeze and crack and it will tkae forever to figure it out, while in the mean time the water is destroying your camper. A Canvas sided popup requires 100,000 BTU heater to keep the ice off your nose!
     
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  4. Grandpa Don

    Grandpa Don Well-Known Member

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    I don't want to knock anybody's choice of a camper. You like what you like. And I think it depends on what type of camping you do. I looked at the A-frame campers with the intent of buying one. Then I did a lot of research on YouTube and found a guy from Canada who travels all the time in his Aliner. He is one heck of a nice guy and puts out some really great videos. But I noticed that he was always making repairs or modifications to the Aliner. Granted it was an older one. Most modifications were to correct some inadequacy in the camper. Most of it had to do with air leaks from poor seals around the top. And his inability to clean all of the snow off the top when closing it up. I was concerned enough about the seals and air leaks to go down to the local dealer and talk to them about it. The salesman assured me that the new models did not have a seal problem. So he took me out to the lot and opened up one of the new models. Guess what? When it was fully set up, I notices the rubber seal sticking out at a place where it had come loose from the frame. That stopped me in my tracks!

    If I had my choice, I would have a hard side travel trailer. I had one many years ago. But the camping I do, and the places I want to go, would not allow me to get a big trailer in the spot. I very rarely ever go to an improved camp ground with hook-ups. I'm always boondocking. A wide spot in the trees or brush at the end of a gnarly rough dusty road is fine for me. I'm afraid I would just tear up a hard side trailer.

    I ended up buying a Viking popup. True they are not the best for camping in cold winters. Especially in the snow. The lift systems can be troublesome at times and the canvas does not provide much security. But it is what works for me. And by the way, that Canadian guy recently sold his A-frame and bought one of those round Fiberglass egg-shaped trailers. We, his Subscribers, are anxiously waiting to see his next video to see how he likes it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2020
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  5. Thox Spuddy

    Thox Spuddy Active Member

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    Slim Potatohead on YouTube states that his A-liner gets much more than normal use as he travels in it much of the year. He does bring out some good points but his replacement is a hard sided camper.
     
  6. DiamondGirl

    DiamondGirl Well-Known Member

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    If you buy an older Aliner and don’t use quality replacements, you get what you pay for. Old materials being repaired by cheap products equals a shorten lifespan for your trailer.

    Happy Camping...[ALPU][PUT]
     
  7. Econ

    Econ Well-Known Member

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    In one of his videos he mentions something like over a 100,000 miles in 4 or 5 years. He is probably in the upper percentages of use for a camper. His camper is a 2003(??). It has been hauled down some rocky roads. The impression is that cost was a very important factor when he bought it which makes one question the condition it was in when he bough it.

    An Aliner is what it is. It was designed for people without pickup trucks. Light weight is important. This could imply underdesign for heavy use. My impression is most campers are underdesigned. It is foolish to expect car level quality in a camper unless you are talking Yugos.

    We went to a RV show and looked at the new Airstreams - $100,000+. The smell of formaldehyde was overwhelming. To us this is worst than any quality defect Aliner has. I dont want my camper outliving me.<GG>

    So I have decided to accept it for what it is, fix any problems and quit complaining. It does what i want it to do better than anything else.
     
  8. Grandpa Don

    Grandpa Don Well-Known Member

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    You like, what you like! I would still consider buying an Aliner. I like the hard side and fold down low profile of the Aliner. But I already made my decision three years ago and I'm happy with what I have.
     
  9. Enigmacamper

    Enigmacamper Active Member

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    I feel like I could have written this post, except I feel Airstreams aren't nearly as bad in the formaldehyde department as many other brands, last time we went to a RV show at the Civic Center you entered the ROOM and were bowled over by the smell just from the campers parked in it! For the record, the Azdel portions of the Aliner are supposedly formaldehyde free *I believe*.

    It's been said but I would agree with most posters here, for the sheer flexibility of temperature and setup I would vote for the Aliner over a popup.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2020
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  10. woodentoy

    woodentoy Member Gold Supporting Member

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    I have an Aliner Classic and love it. We got it after we decided to take a cross country trip and realized the the pop up that we had at the time would be too much work on a daily basis with set up. We travel over 10,000 miles a year and spend over 100 nights in it with an 80 pound Lab. The A frame design has worked very well for us. The thing that makes it comfortable for us is the dormers. That’s what really sold me on the Aliner.
     
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  11. Enigmacamper

    Enigmacamper Active Member

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    Do you have the hard or soft dormers? We go back and forth on which we'd prefer :).
     
  12. woodentoy

    woodentoy Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Soft dormers. More light and ventilation. All the windows in the dormers are able to be un zipped for incredible ventilation. I don't believe the ones in the hard dormers open.
     
  13. jeicher

    jeicher Member

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    Over the years I've owned three Aliners. As I got older and needed more amenities I went with a small non-folding travel trailer, but most of the time though I had both an Aliner and a TT. The Aliner was always the choice when traveling long distances. Now that I am in my 80s I had to sell my Aliner, but really do miss having it. Of course the real long trips are not an issue anymore so the TT with a full bathroom works for now.

    My last Aliner I even installed a Thetford cassette toilet which did extend its usefulness for me https://photos.app.goo.gl/DygTdcJK7jHWwERH7 [​IMG] All my mods have been to personalize the trailer for how I used it.
     
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  14. jackquontee

    jackquontee Active Member Diamond Supporting Member

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    Yes, the windows in the hard dormers do open. They slide sideways. IMG_0384.JPG
     
  15. shawvanclan

    shawvanclan New Member

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    Do the Aliner windows which do open have screens? Watched a ton of videos and I still cant determine.
    Anyone with soft dormers having concerns with the "tenting?" you know...mold and such
     
  16. Anthony Hitchings

    Anthony Hitchings Well-Known Member

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    can't speak for dormers, but my ALiner windows are fully screened
     
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  17. DiamondGirl

    DiamondGirl Well-Known Member

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    I don’t have dormers on my Aliner Classic. The bubble windows (on the roof panels) do not open but the side windows do. Including the window on my door. A total of 3 sliding windows.

    Happy Camping...[ALPU][PUT]
     
  18. woodentoy

    woodentoy Member Gold Supporting Member

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    There are screens on the side windows and one on the door on my Classic. I also have the soft dormers which are screened also, the ventilation is excellent. No mold issues on mine.
     
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  19. jackquontee

    jackquontee Active Member Diamond Supporting Member

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    Yes, the hard dormers are screened, as well.
     

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