AAA PLUS RV

Discussion in 'Road Safety Systems' started by GeoG100, Aug 17, 2020.

  1. GeoG100

    GeoG100 Member

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    Anybody use AAA Plus RV membership upgrade from AAA for their pop up for roadside emergencies? Have you ever had to cash in on it and did AAA come through on it? Is it worth the upgrade or are they just trying to take my money??
     
  2. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    Years back (maybe 8) AAA/CAA had issues in some areas because their providers didn't offer rv services in all areas, not sure if that changed now or if they still have issues. If you look on their membership application it does say "where services offered ".

    Personally I have Good Sam's roadside (think it's the Platinum membership) for me it was cheaper then getting CAA as GS covers all cars and drivers residing at the same house, it also covers my utility trailer and any vehicle, including rentals that I'm driving. I have used them 3 times in probably 10 years, with no issues. Used twice for vehicle only tows and just last month for a tire change on the trailer.
     
  3. slowcarfast

    slowcarfast Active Member

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    We just got it before our big summer trip. Haven't had to use it yet. AAA is more expensive, but I chose it almost entirely because you can specify your towing destination (as long as it's within the allowed distance). Most other policies are limited to "the closest service center capable of doing the repair" or some similar language. I wanted to have the flexibility to pick a preferred repair shop, or even a hotel parking lot or something if it's a repair I can do myself.
     
  4. Wrenchgear

    Wrenchgear Near Elmira, Southern Ontario

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    In another lifetime ago, I was a driver for CAA for a number of years. I eventually became the fleet mechanic taking care of all the fleet trucks for CAA South Western Ontario, about 20 vehicles in total. I would like to think that I would still be there if AAA didn't pull a political fast one on CAA in general. AAA is the parent company of CAA and mandates what goes on up here. That was supposed to be my last job before retirement, but..... All is contracted out now up here, no more fleets.

    As a CAA driver, I went to RV Plus calls often, and did what I could for them. All the same services apply to the trailer as what do to the TV. The problem was that we didn't have a flatbed tow truck on fleet at the time. I drove a F450 hook truck. So if the thing didn't need to be towed too far, I would hook the TV to my truck, and pull it and the trailer all as one unit. If the TV had to go farther than what I thought was safe, like farther than 5-10 kms, or highway driving or something, I would get dispatch to call a local CAA contractor to come with a flatbed so he could put one up on the bed, and tow the other one. In my opinion, they're not trying to scam your money, you just need to weigh out the condition of your tow vehicle and what the possibilities are that it will break down when you are out with the trailer. I used to have it on my old TV, but I changed to a newer truck a number of years ago, so I'll figure out if I need it in a few years from now when it starts getting older.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2020
  5. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    I ended up using good Sam roadside assistance as my AAA did not offer the RV plus in my area. Not sure if that is still the case as I didn't bother looking into it again. So far never had to use the roadside assistance when towing but wanted to have something in case I do run into problems. I'd rather have it and not need it, then not have it and need it especially if I'm going to be far away from home.
     
  6. MNTCamper

    MNTCamper Well-Known Member

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    I used them on a trip in the summer of 2017. We had our spindle go out on our pop up on route 30 in the Columbian River Gorge. We were able to get it off the road in a quite busy place. We personally found a AAA towing company that would do the tow, but the place that was going to fix it could not get to it until later in the week (replace the spindle on a torflex axle). They were located in Clackamas, OR. We were out there from MN, so we salvaged from the popup and tented for 4 days - actually worked out well. On the day the repair place wanted the camper towed, we got up very early and got to a place with cell service and called AAA, the dispatcher was really a complete dork and said we had to be physically located with the popup (we were about 200 miles away in OR at this point). So, we called the towing place instead and they went and got it (on a flatbed - they knew this) and hauled it over to Clackamas. We got back up to the repair place the next day and they had about one hours worth of work left on the camper and they got it done for us and we then hightailed it down to Redwoods (this was in the middle of a three week trip). All good after that.

    After we got back home, we took the receipt from the towing place and submitted it to AAA under the RV towing coverage that we had and they reimbursed us ($4xx something - it is a long tow). So it worked out fine in the end, no cost to us for the tow. The place that fixed the spindle on the torflex axle is one of the only ones that can do this in the nation (replace the spindle only) - place called Precision Axle(precision driveline now). They were great to work with, they usually work roadside service on large semi rigs to get them back on the road.
     
  7. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    I have had and used both AAA and Good Sam. Here are my thoughts on them:

    AAA will tow a set distance for free towing*. Good Sam/Coachnet will tow you to the closest repair shop that agrees to take your vehicle/camper. Therefore, AAA will send out a tow truck as soon as available. Good Sam/Coachnet won't send a tow truck until they have arranged with a repair shop.

    What this means is if you break down on a holiday weekend, you can wait days for Good Sam/Coachnet to send a tow, because they can't confirm a shop if the shops are closed. On the other hand, if you are in an unfamiliar area, you have to do your own calls to find a repair shop if you use AAA.

    Good Sam will send a mobile mechanic first before they will arrange for a tow and repair shop. If the problem is simple and parts are easily attainable, this is good. If you have an unusual problem or a vehicle/camper with obsolete/hard to find parts, this can result in a lot of wasted time before you can get towed.

    *AAA's 100 mile free towing is based on a standard tow truck rate. If your vehicle/camper requires a larger truck and/or two trucks, the free mileage will decrease significantly. My clipper requires a medium duty wrecker - that reduces the free towing in half at least.

    Coachnet operates in a,similar fashion as Good Sam, but it gets far better reviews.

    Good Sam is great at resolving issues after the fact. However, their phone reps tend to fail in the actual emergency situation. Folks have been left on the side of the road for over 5 hours with no updates from the rep.

    AAA's service quality is dependent upon the region. Some regions are far better than others.

    Over the years, I have had to use both AAA and Good Sam. AAA has always sent a tow truck within a few hours. Good Sam had me sitting from 2 pm to 10 pm while they attempted to reach a repair shop on the Sunday before Memorial Day. When I asked about the concierge service included in my plan to help get my pets home, I was told "we don't do that". When I questioned their leaving me sitting for 5 hours without an update, they told me to call 911. At 10 pm, I called AAA. I had a friend come get me and the pets. At 8 am, I arranged to meet AAA at the camper. They were there on schedule, on a holiday. They sent two different trucks as they were unsure which was required. Both drivers attempted to trouble shoot the problem. Unfortunately, neither truck would work, so they called for a third truck (this is when I learned that the clipper requires a medium duty wrecker). The third truck arrived within an hour and towed the clipper 90 miles. It cost $500 out of pocket for the tow*. After contacting Good Sam and explaining the events, they reviewed the call recording and acknowledged their rep was inappropriate. They reimbursed the $500.

    *Depending on the distance the tow truck must travel to reach you, they may add that mileage to your charge. In my case, they added the 60 miles the truck made to reach me from its home base to my charges.

    In the end, I recommend getting both AAA and Good Sam or Coachnet. For under $300 per year, you get the best of both worlds. And if one fails, you can call the other.
     
  8. Spridle

    Spridle Well-Known Member

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    I have premier RV with AAA. They have been pretty good, but there are limits for sure. For me it's just some peace of mind and in the case of the June fiasco, it saved me a $350 tow to Pittsburgh. So basically three years as paid for in one shot.
     

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