An observation. PU basically a rolling tent?

Discussion in 'General Camping Discussion Forum' started by dbhost, Feb 2, 2021.

  1. littlebritches

    littlebritches Member

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    When I first bought my popup, I didn't think I would use the stove inside for hardly anything. Now.....well, I make good use of it. Most of the time where I camp, there are no picnic tables so outdoor cooking would include a table, a stove, extra propane, etc. Then I would have to haul all of the utensils and cookware from the camper to the cooking area. Then when done having to return it all and put away the stove, wipe down the table, etc. As a result, I have slowly started cooking more and more inside. I find it VERY convenient.

    As to the heater, with lows in the 20's to 40's, I love my heater!! I LOVE having coffee in a nice warm area while waiting for everyone else to wake up.

    My sink and I have a love/hate relationship. I love it when it is hooked up via a hose (but this is rare). I like it when you have to pump it for brushing teeth. When not hooked up to a hose, I hate it for washing hands as you have to pump it while trying to rinse your hands. Mostly we use it to hold the dishpan while we do dishes and then a good hand washing before throwing out the water.

    As to space to cook/prep. I use the table extensively and have found little niches for most other things. I have a cutting board I put over the sink if I need additional counter space.

    Like gladecreekwy, I live in WY just a little further away from bear central (Yellowstone). I would agree, a clean camp goes a LONG way for not having issues with wildlife. As for smells, they will smell your bacon whether you cook it inside or outside. Personally, I usually cook it outside (to avoid splatter issues). However, when it was in the 30's with the wind howling, you bet I cooked it (carefully) inside!

    I think a lot of where you cook has to do with your environment (temperatures and weather) and what you enjoy. Personally, I don't enjoy dirt in my food (carried by the wind).

    AC - while I had it - was nice - when electrical hookups were available (maybe 1 time in 10). However, when my AC quit working, I took it out. It was too large, not property mounted, causing the roof to sag, water to pool and the roof to leak. I have replaced it with a vent with a fan and only miss it about 1 trip in 20.

    Refrigerator - Love it on electricity. However, again, that is rare. Mostly I keep drinks in it and food that will be eaten that day or that doesn't require consistent colder temps. I use an indoor/outdoor thermometer to watch the temps-it is close to freezing in the morning and close to 45-50 in the afternoon sun of the summer.
     
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  2. maryloucb

    maryloucb Member

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    Different strokes for different folks. Some people like camping with full hookups at developed campgrounds, some like boondocking up a rough 4wd road. For us the pup provides comfortable beds, storage space for all our camping gear, a place to hang out and read/play cards and games at night or when the weather is bad, and a heater. We do most of our cooking, eating, and hanging out outside. I use the stove inside for boiling water for coffee in the morning, and then occasionally if it's really cold or nasty outside I'll cook inside. We use the sink for brushing teeth (we usually don't put water in the pup's water tank, but instead use jugs.) We use the fridge for storage. That's just how we roll. We still backpack and use the tent, so the pup seems pretty luxurious.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2021
  3. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    I'm in an odd middle spot. I like campgrounds that are small and/or mostly empty. I don't want or need hookups. I cook 98% indoors and eat about 50/50 indoor/outdoor. During the day, I will go on casual hikes with the dogs and take photos. I will hang outside at the campsite during the day with a book. If I nap, I go inside. I don't use solar or a generator. The only set up I do outside is a couple chairs and a small table. In the evening, when it starts getting chilly, I go inside and hang out on the couch reading.

    I got a camper so I had a comfortable private place when out and so I didn't need to store and setup and takedown and store a bunch of gear.
     
  4. cjm0mmy

    cjm0mmy Member

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    Our first pup was a used Nimrod! We moved up to a bigger pup when we had a kid. But that Nimrod was a great first pup.
     
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  5. firepit

    firepit Well-Known Member

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    If your concerned with bears whatsoever a pop up is not for you...i think the no pop ups in bear country is a good rule.
    But lets be real....rather you cook in your pop up or 10 yds away outside a bear is going smell it from miles away.
    Bears are curious animals so rather you cook outside or inside and put all your food in bear proof containers its not gonna stop a curious bear from investigating and shredding things in the process.
    You wont see me in a pop up anywhere near bear country rather i follow the so called bear rules or not.
    Bears have already been conditioned to seek out campsites for food.
    If a bear is strolling along and you have cooked outside and all your waste and edibles are in bear proof containers he/she is still smelling it rather they can access it or not so you will still encounter them.
    Throw in a barking dog and screaming when when a giant paw rips threw your canvas and the result is the same.
    We dont even need to discuss what happens if mamma bear wanders into camp with cubs in the middle of the night.
     
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  6. cjm0mmy

    cjm0mmy Member

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    Our first pup didn't have a stove or sink or even a table. So we cooked outside. Our second pup had a stove and sink, but absolutely no counter space. We used the sink for a bedside table and the closed stove for the lantern (we did a lot of dry camping), a mirror and maybe a couple other things. So, we still cooked outside. Over the years we pretty much had a really good camp kitchen setup and a really super attached room, so unless the weather was awful, or the bugs were unbearable, we mostly lived outside in that room. Because of the lack of cabinet space in the pup all the kitchen items were in storage bins. We bought a TT last year and do a lot of the cooking indoors now. One of the main reasons we went dark was hating having to drag everything out for setup and then back in for pack-up. With the cabinet and kitchen setup in our TT we don't use bins anymore. If we did most of the cooking outside I would be doing that setup and pack-up again. No way. We do have a blackstone griddle and a portable propane grill, and we will use those if the weather is nice. We have not noticed a lingering smell from cooking in the TT. I'd probably do any really stinky cooking outside still. And it sure is nice to heat my tea water in my cozy indoor camper. And cook the frozen scones in my oven.
     
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  7. raising4daughters

    raising4daughters Member

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    Count us among those that do all cooking outside when camping. As others have said, we camp to be outdoors.

    One reason I didn't see stated is simply that we enjoy grilling. With our old PUP, we brought a grill along; our NTUS HW PUP came with a grill instead of a double stovetop, so we bring our 2-burner Coleman stove along. Since it's summer when we camp, why heat up the PUP? That said, the HW also came with a microwave, and that's turned out to be more useful than we expected. Microwave popcorn takes up a lot less space than bags of chips and pretzels.
     
  8. Rik Peery

    Rik Peery Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    We carry a couple of small air horns used for boaters/sports etc but as of yet have had no bear encounters, although they've been seen in the state park we frequent on occasion & have done a cooler raid on a few sites; pal is a Ranger & had to use low recoil rubber buckshot once on a stubborn bear that ran a fam into their TT during lunch last year...we keep keep a clean a site as possible...
     
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  9. Eric Webber

    Eric Webber Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    We tend to camp in campgrounds, and are very rarely on the outskirts since those sites tend to fill up before I get into the system to reserve. Not too worried about wildlife walking past a bunch of other sites to come to my popup - even if I definitely have lots of cooking going on during the day
     
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  10. Rik Peery

    Rik Peery Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    For sure, used to get nightly raids from skunks/coons, couple of bear started showing up bout 3 years ago; so many people leave stuff sitting out/around the cleaner sites are generally untouched...
     
  11. tfischer

    tfischer A bad day camping beats a good day at the office Gold Supporting Member

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    We camped at Yellowstone a couple summers ago so I bought bear spray. When we're in active bear territory (rarely) I keep it on the dinette next to the bed at night just in case of emergency. Fortunately never have needed to use it, either inside or outside the camper.

    We were hiking at GSMNP last summer and there was a bear just off the trail. We gave him plenty of distance but some others on the trail were much too close. The bear was visibly nervous and wanted to cross, finally basically walking between two groups only a dozen or so feet apart. I was glad to have bear spray on my belt at that time even though he would have mauled someone else before us lol.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2021
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  12. desertwilde67

    desertwilde67 Member

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    I started cooking outdoors because my son was little at the time and I would watch him and cook outside. I have a snack size table next to the stove on the side of the camper and a folding table on the other side of the door. It allowed me prep space and keeps the picnic table clear. I also store the cooler under the table as well. I camp to be outdoors and love doing it this way. I live in AZ so chance of rain is pretty minimal most of the time.
     
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  13. Susan Premo

    Susan Premo Well-Known Member

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    If you cook your bacon at home, freeze it, then bring it with you for camping, not as smelly when you reheat it. Tastes the same, but if there's bears around, I doubt that would help too much. More for convenience sake .
     
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  14. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    I would never get close enough to a bear to use the spray - but I don't hike on real wilderness trails either. At camp, banging pots and pans has always been enough to get the bear to move on long before it gets close to anyone.

    Of all the creatures out where I camp, the ones I worry about most are the coyotes. They aren't nervous around us. They keep their distance to a point, but a pet dog who sees them will try to go after them more so than other wildlife. My Moose-dog and Bat-dog thought they were just other dogs and wanted to chase them away from "our property". One of the reasons my dogs are always on leashes.
     
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  15. Dingit

    Dingit Well-Known Member

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    It's always a good idea to follow local bear regulations--bear behavior varies dramatically from one spot to the next. A bear poked a dainty hole in my screen room last year near Carson Pass. Tahoe bears would probably have eaten my truck. :)
     
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  16. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    Tahoe bears are some of the most obnoxious. A friend drove up to her Tahoe cabin, parked the car and went inside. No food or anything in the car. That night, she heard a racket outside. She looked out and a bear had opened the door to the car, climbed inside, and his movements caused the door to shut. She called the rangers and they stood around saying "I'm not going to go open the door". After about 10-15 minutes, the bear's frantic movements got the door open and he took off. The car was totaled by the insurance.
     
  17. Dingit

    Dingit Well-Known Member

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    They are the worstest! My neighbor's Tahoe "cabin" (you know how those cabins are just small houses--nothing cabiny about them) got hit by a bear. You can't empty a house into a bear box!
     
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  18. Susan Premo

    Susan Premo Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that's , bad.
     
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  19. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    The main issue with Tahoe is that it is really highly people populated for a "bear country" location. That has really pushed the contact between them. And for many many years people have encouraged that contact to the point of conditioning the bears. Even though locals have learned, there is such a high number of visitors that don't follow the rules, that the bears continue to see people as a sign of easy food.
     
  20. tfischer

    tfischer A bad day camping beats a good day at the office Gold Supporting Member

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    I wouldn't *intentionally* get that close to a bear either lol. the trail where we saw the bear (actually we saw him twice, or at least we saw a bear on the way out and again near the same location on the way back) was a popular one... about a 2 1/2 mile round trip done by many visitors to the park as there is a series of beautiful waterfalls well worth the hike.
     
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