Anderson Levler in use- first time

Discussion in 'Leveling Your Camper' started by IdahoPopUp, Oct 9, 2016.

  1. IdahoPopUp

    IdahoPopUp Member

    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    Here is my first use. Did I back up too far because of the tire is hanging off? The location was very uneven and required it.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. TRR

    TRR Active Member

    Messages:
    449
    Likes Received:
    224
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Location:
    Alabama USA
    I'd say you're just about at the extent of its limit. I think I'd be more comfortable if the backside of the tire was chocked to keep it from rolling on off. Might take a couple of boards on the ground and then a chock. Or just a great big rock.
     
  3. gruss

    gruss Active Member

    Messages:
    1,251
    Likes Received:
    20
    Joined:
    May 6, 2014
    Looks OK, I always put the chock on the downhill side so gravity will make sure it doesn't roll off. My camper sat on ours about like that all winter in my yard on the Andersen and it didn't move.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
     
  4. IdahoPopUp

    IdahoPopUp Member

    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    We were at that limits of our ability to level both side-to-side and front-to-back. The other side had a BAL chock. I will bring one of my cheap plastic chocks along next time to use in conjunction with the Anderson if the situation is similar.
    Thanks for the input

    IPU
     
  5. MItoVA

    MItoVA Member

    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    Location:
    Tidewater, VA
    I'm an Anderson Leveler-user, too...and while I've never had to use the full height with mine, doing so would make me a little nervous. I probably would have used a block under the Andersen to increase the range to reduce the risk of rolling off the end.


    But the hard-plastic of the Anderson could slip on the wooden boards I use as "landing pads." I've heard of people cutting up "stall mats" (the very same as those used for horse stalls) for use as leveling blocks. I haven't tried it...yet...but I can see some advantages over wood blocks, not the least of which is the indestructible nature of the solid-rubber construction. Additional traction. No rot. No bugs. Apparently they can be cut with a simple box-knife...as demonstrated by the guy in this video: https://youtu.be/6c2nFUeD6nA?t=2m45s. (The "introduction" takes up half of the video, so my link starts where the video gets "practical," around 2:45.) The idea was first championed (in public, anyway) on an RV blog: http://www.rv-boondocking-the-good-life.com/rvlevelingblocks.html.


    One of my off-season plans over the winter is to replace my wood landing pads with some of these stall-mats pads. Your post serves as a reminder for me cut a couple extras to the size of the Anderson Leveler in the event I need to boost the lift-height.
     
  6. ScoobyDoo

    ScoobyDoo New Member

    Messages:
    367
    Likes Received:
    13
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2016
    At home, where I park the camper, I have a pair of old rubber mudflaps. Have bolted a 4X4 to the end, and on the other side, spaced right, a 2X4. The 2X is under the rubber when in place. They never move, when I back in, I get on rubber, (hold in place) over the 2X4, and against 4X4. Unhook, I'm parked and chocked...
    Would that work under your fingerbighter?
     
  7. gruss

    gruss Active Member

    Messages:
    1,251
    Likes Received:
    20
    Joined:
    May 6, 2014
    Lol, I like that finger biter thing...but it's hard to get bitten with the opposite wheels chocked and it still hooked to the vehicle.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
     
  8. ScoobyDoo

    ScoobyDoo New Member

    Messages:
    367
    Likes Received:
    13
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2016
    I have never used one. From what I see, you stop with the trailer on a ramp, a pretty steep ramp, and chock the wheels. You say you chock the low wheel first. That is some better, the chock likely doesn't fit the tire as tight, more room for fingers.
    A long time ago, a line of cars parked, everybody out watching. LEOs show up, order everybody in their cars to leave. We had to pull up to the line, set the parking brake, try to back up. If the cage moved, you bought a ticket to the street races. When I saw how few could make the parking brake hold... I always make sure my ship is held by something else, then set the brake, if there is a chance that a inch of movement can do harm. Yes, I know a lot has changed on cars in the last 50 years, but the manual still says chock a wheel before you jack it up...
    Everybody has their on plan. We get to site, decide where we want the camper. I look for hazards to putting it there, DW looks for any hazards to the dogs in the area. She hooks the dogs out of way, I park and level the camper. By the time I pull the TV away, she is ready to help with set-up. True, the Anderson does not have "steps" like my legos, you could get more level, when my tire is on the top step there is very little slope trying to make it move while I chock it. I don't think I will ever forget the last time I expected help with leveling/chocking. I had built the stack, with one chock in place, left the other chock laying there, 2 on the other side. Put the trailer up on the stack. Got out, placed the chocks on the low side. When I stood up, DW was standing up on the other side of trailer. I cranked the jack, as soon as the coupler cleared the ball, the trailer spinning around the wheel I had chocked, powered by coming down the step hit me in the leg. Knot on my shin where the tongue hit, knots on my head for language that passed the other tongue. I unhook after I have chocked both wheels. YMMV
    Latter, I asked "What where you doing when I thought you where chocking the wheel?" Luke had the leash around his leg...
     
  9. gruss

    gruss Active Member

    Messages:
    1,251
    Likes Received:
    20
    Joined:
    May 6, 2014
    I hammer chocks in the opposite wheel, then put the chock in for Andersen, if something went wrong the leveler might chop my dead blow in half, my fingers aren't very close to anything usually. Seen to many things around machinery, I'm a chicken...if I thought the thing was dangerous I wouldn't recommend it but you're right, caution is always wise.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
     
  10. ill.plainsman

    ill.plainsman happy, happy

    Messages:
    953
    Likes Received:
    16
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Location:
    Champaign Illinois
    Idaho , I think you are pretty close to being over extended. I did the same thing first time out. A lot of times if you have a very uneven spot, you can jack knife the trailer a little in hopes of causing the center of gravity to change in your favor. Unless you are parking in a KOA or private RVpark that has you crammed in like sardines.
    If you want they make a Anderson with an 8" lift but its called a jack. its used on a double axel trailer to get the other axel high enough to remove the other tire. It comes with a rubber pad as wide as the Anderson but no wheel chock. sold separately. I have the jack now as well as the original. I only use one when parking of course. I have parked on the jack and it sure was a long way up when it was level. Have fun. [CP]
     
  11. IdahoPopUp

    IdahoPopUp Member

    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    Thanks for all the input.
     
  12. Bowman3d

    Bowman3d Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    860
    Likes Received:
    367
    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2015
    Location:
    LaLa land (SoCal)
    If it's that far out of level maybe think about digging a hole on the other side so you don't have to pull it so far up on the Anderson. I know it kinda defeats the ease of use appeal to the Anderson but how often is it that far out. Plus you can't always dig where your parked.just a thought
     
  13. vagov

    vagov Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,402
    Likes Received:
    523
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2012
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, Pa
    Put a peice of lumber under the Anderson for additional height, a 2x6. May give you the additional height without fear of over extending the 4 inch wedge. I never had slip probems. With the wood and plastic wedge, make sure you chock well .
     
  14. brdeel

    brdeel Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    56
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2018
    Location:
    CO
    I had the triangle leveler blocks and had a hard time getting it just right. Forward and back, forward and back, in 1 to 1/2 inch at a time. My tried and true easy to use precise leveler is the Bal Leveler. It saves us so much time at setup.
    bal-rv-accessories-28050-64_1000.jpg
     

Share This Page