Biking around campsites

Discussion in 'Biking' started by mesuezee, Apr 5, 2012.

  1. mesuezee

    mesuezee New Member

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    So my kids have got their bicycles pretty much down pat, now my DH and I need something to ride along with them. I know nothing about "new bikes" the last one I had was a plain old ten speed bike from a Caldors I think. Is there anything about your bike you would want different, or must haves- I am thinking a big enough seat LOL. any suggestions for something lightweight, inexpensive but not a total piece of junk....thanks!
     
  2. campfreak

    campfreak Well-Known Member

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    An inexpensive mountain bike or beach cruiser would do it. Stay away from rear suspension bikes, they are usually really heavy. The best luck I have had is getting an older, quality bike off Craigslist, or a used bike shop. It's nice to have decent quality "beater" bikes for camping. They are cheaper to start with, and you don't have to worry so much about locking them up, or getting scratched while traveling.

    Greg
     
  3. gec66

    gec66 Active Member

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    The nicest bike for the "mature" crowd in my opinion is what they call a "comfort" bike. It is basically a mountain bike frame, but typically has an adjustable handle bar head that can be set so you pretty much sit straight up instead of leaning way over the handle bars with a lot of weight on your hands. As I get older my wrists just can't take it. I can still adjust it down low if I am going on a long distance ride where I want to lower my profile to catch less wind. They also typically have a shock mounted seat post to cushion the ride on your behind and may have front and/or rear suspension depending on the model. You can go to a bike shop and get an good quality entry level bike for around $300, or you can get a "big box" Schwinn or other brand at Walmart, etc. for $125-175 or so. To me suspension and the adjustable handle bar head are the bees knees! Beach cruisers also seem to have come back into style. The craigslist thing is a great idea once you know what you are looking for. I bought my comfort bike 10 years ago when they were very new and there weren't any used ones out there yet, but my brother has been picking up the $300-400 models for $100-150 with diligence and patience. Good luck!
     
  4. nancyanddan

    nancyanddan Well-Known Member

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    Picked up this beauty for $200 at Costco back in 2010: a Diamondback Vital 2 CitiBike. I love it!

    [​IMG]
    (photo taken at Big Basin Redwoods State Park in Northern CA)
     
  5. fmbhappycamper

    fmbhappycamper PuP Power

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    Stow away city bike from Golf outlets, I can fold it in 1/2 and put it in the back of my TV [8D]
     
  6. GA Judy

    GA Judy Active Member

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  7. wantingapup

    wantingapup New Member

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    Second the comfort bike... Now that I'm over 50 I enjoy the ease of getting on and the nice height of the handlebars. Get a wide seat, and a gel seat cover - and also make sure the seat is adjusted to the right tilt or certain parts will be numb.
     
  8. haroldpe

    haroldpe Campin' Engineer

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    Had a road bike for many years, then to a hybrid, and just this year went to a comfort: Electra Townie. But generally not that light nor inexpensive. Should be no more numb fingers/wrists, though.
     
  9. austinm48

    austinm48 http://s1174.photobucket.com/albums/r604/austinm48

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  10. Hacksaw

    Hacksaw Active Member

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    I ride a Cannondale Silk 400. It's 10 years old. I generally like it but not a big fan of the headshok...I am also a former competitive road biker and before that a BMXer so I am used to light and stiff...the Silk frame is stiff but the suspended seat post makes the rear triangle seem wishy washy and the headshok (while it does a fine job of absorbing the little bumps and ruts) just feels "soft" I will probably end up replacing the fork/headset with a rigid (or buying one of those Townies ! what do they run price wise?)
     
  11. austinm48

    austinm48 http://s1174.photobucket.com/albums/r604/austinm48

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    umm replace it dont try to change the fork its inch and a half headset and all others are 1 1/8 headset so its a headset adapther and then a headset and then the fork so its expensive very fast if you can find the adapter a hybrid comfort bike figure between 250 to 400 for a good one they make a 26inch and a 700c hybrid go for the 26 its better in grass and light trails

    I worked for 2 years as a bike mechanic!!!
     
  12. thermonieum

    thermonieum New Member

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    i found an old huffy beside a garbage can with a rear wheel trashed, replaced it with a wheel that has a three speed hub with coaster brake. looks awful, dont think anyone would even think of stealing it, but it is a wonderful ride. with the rear wheel and hub i probably could have bought a new bike, but maintance is very min and dont have to worry about sand in the gear changer stuff
     
  13. Flyfisherman

    Flyfisherman New Member

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    Love to bike around the C/G ~ and with no more then a couple of bike-bikes - single speed, reverse the pedal for a brake, nice riders. One has a basket so if there is a C/G store one can carry back whatever items ... like one particular place, a bag of ice. Here's the best pic of them ~

    [​IMG]
     
  14. USKustoms

    USKustoms pimp my trailer

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  15. themanfromvan

    themanfromvan Van, PA - Near The PA Wilds

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    Three votes for the comfort bike, or hybrid and some call it. Get a saddle like this one........
    [​IMG]

    Some think those bike seats that are wider than a sofa are the way to go. Not in my experience. These seats with the "crotch relief" split up the middle are very comfortable.
     
  16. jim123

    jim123 New Member

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  17. mred

    mred 2008 Fleetwood Avalon, 2001 f350

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    mesuezee,
    I am a bike enthusiast, in fact its what I've done for a living for 23 years now. Here is my advise.
    1. Go to your local bike shop. they will help you wade thew all the hype and find a good choice for you.
    2. Test Ride. you will know what you will like when you ride them. Its a great way to get learn.
    3. Think about the after costs. Bikes need maintenance. try to find a shop that gives or sells some sort of service plan.
    4. as per gears. think about where you will be using the bike. Do you camp in the mountains or at the beach. If you camp in the hills you will want some gears. And here is why a bike shop is so important, they will show you how to use the equipment.
    5. Price. A good bike will run between 3 and 5 hundred dollars. I know its allot, But most people keep a bike for 15 years, you don't want a P.O.S. for 15 years. you want something that is easy to use and fun to ride. You didn't buy the cheepest house, you didn't buy the cheepest pup, don't buy the cheepest bike.

    goodluck in your search. Ask allot of questions at the store, and most importantly Answer allot of questions. If they don't ask questions they don't care about getting you the right bike.

    If you want pm me and I'll figure out which shop in your area is a good one.

    Mr. ed
     
  18. Hacksaw

    Hacksaw Active Member

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    I did a stint as a bike mechanic also... I'm not intimidated. I know I can get the proper headset and fork (i've already found it) But thanks for the input!
     
  19. Brate

    Brate Bravado!

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    I cant contribute more than what already has other than make sure the bike fits the intended use. For me I like to hit the trails occasionally so I got a beefier mountain bike (just not to beefy). My wife has a cheaper Mountain bike but I want to get her a beach cruiser style bike because I know that will fit her riding style and be more comfortable.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  20. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    I agree that wider is not better, which seems counter-intuitive. I don't use the upright bikes at the gym for that reason - I commented to one of the trainers that the seat was not working for me. She said they had a gel cover, which would just have made it worse. I've threatened to bring my good saddle from home, I have the women's version of the relief saddle.
    I have a Trek bike, a "step-through" one - what we used to call a girls' bike, but by calling it step-through men of a certain age are not scared away. Had it several years, my neck and wrists can be an issue, but I hope to ride it some this year. The last time I had it out, it was on Open Space Trails, I braked too hard & landed with my hand in a cactus. If nothing else, DH is putting it on the trainer so I can get some exercise while recovering from foot surgery next week, I can peddle with my heel. Maybe I'll conquer the grip-shifters on the trainer - they are not my favorite, I occasionally shift when I don't mean to, like when hitting a bump; if not and I can ride it, DH will change them out for more standard shifters.
    It was great to have the bike at Canyonlands Needles district a few years ago. We were quite a distance away from the main restroom, and I rode the bike there on a couple of days when DH was off hiking/biking alone. It was hot and the vault toilet closer to the campsite was hotter than an oven and we won't even talk about the odor!
     

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