Blowout Airlines only / no antifreeze- Sporadic winter use

Discussion in 'Camper Storage / Winterizing & De-Winterizing' started by DigitalGuru, Oct 13, 2018.

  1. DigitalGuru

    DigitalGuru Active Member

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    To expand on my question of leaving the popup popped in and unheated 32x48 pole barn w/o insulation; I'm winterizing it now and considering not putting antifreeze in the lines (at least yet maybe later in the winter) in the tank and water lines. I've blown out the water lines, hot water tank, low points, external shower, etc. We might be going to the property a few times before the snow gets crazy, and I'd like to use the tank / water / toilet while there. You think I could fill the tank while I'm there and be safe with re-blowing out if I were to take the air compressor and blowout after each use? I thought I remember someone saying they only ever blew out lines, but they may have lived in a more mild climate than northern Michigan!

    EDIT: I thought better safe than sorry, and added antifreeze. I'm not sure when I will be closing on the property and didn't want to risk it!
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2018
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  2. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

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    I lived in as cold of climate and for may years (30+) only drained and blew out the lines and water heater and left all faucets and valves open. I did put antifreeze in any trap.

    All was well until a few years ago. I had an issue with my water pump. If the pump stops within a few degrees of TOD of any of the three high points on the cam and the pump is charged with water it can crack the cam plate and the pump will never develop much prusure.

    Now I pump about 2 cups of antifreeze through the pump. But still drain and blow out the system.
     
  3. roybraddy

    roybraddy Well-Known Member

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    We used to do some winter camping locally here where the temps very seldom get down to freezing and I would drain my one fresh water tank at the low point drain. If I open both COLD and HOT at the sink it drains down my hot water heater real good too going out the low drain port at the same time. Then I would hook up my tankless 12V air compressor and blow every thing out using the city water port using an AIR adapter. I only have one drain trap at my sink so I will add a few cups of antifreeze in the sink trap.

    When we are camping I have a couple of aquatainer totes to capture the sink waste water. When one container gets full I switch to other container and haul off the full one ... I usually can pour this gray water up around a tree trunk away from the camp setup site.

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    Roy's image

    It is easy to go camping in the cold months for us and just add some water to the fresh water tank to use when we get setup in the woods somewhere... Sometimes we can get away with just a 5-gallon jeri can and some bottled drinking water to cook with and make coffee with. This whole process using the blow out method for us only takes a few minutes... If I had a bigger trailer with multiple lines going everwhere I would probably do some more drastic haha...

    Roy Ken
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  4. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

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    You should also drain the shower hoses if you have any.

    We travel a bit in the winter. For the most part I just drain like roybraddly does and leave all faucet a and valves open. But I do take antifreeze and the hose to run 2 cups through the pump. Many of nights snow and days while traveling in the teens. We always fill up with water at CS. Never hook up with hose. Nothen worst then a frozen hose when you want to leave. Lol .Aske me how I know?
     
  5. DigitalGuru

    DigitalGuru Active Member

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    Thanks for the input. My main concern was the water pump and cassette toilet hand pump, so that's why I bit the bullet and put antifreeze in. I felt pretty good about the lines, but the water pump esp. was a concern. Better safe than sorry!
     
  6. Lagman

    Lagman Member

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    Yeh I’m a little worried about that cassette hopper too. Should I put some anti freeze in the top and give a couple pumps.
     
  7. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    I put antifreeze in the cassette toilet after draining all the water. Then pump it all though the lines and leave a bit sitting on the black seal so it remains moist. Nice thing about the cassette toilet is you can still use it with antifreeze in the lines. If I'm camping when it's freezing out I just put some water in the bottom tank and flush with the antifreeze. Works just fine and at the end of the trip I just dump the contents in the base and done. Just leave a little antifreeze on the seal. On my camper I have a slew of lines under my camper, so I don't trust using any onboard water and just bring a jug of water to use if I camp when it's freezing.
    I camped once when the temps got down to 20*F and I accidentally left a 5 gallon jug of water outside. So to say that jug was frozen solid and the spout cracked. I'm just glad it was that and not my camper lines that cracked. I don't camp much in the late fall as I much, as I just don't like the cold and I need my furnace uninterrupted. So have to have more power than what my battery can provide. Then again I have very poor circulation in my hands and feet so its harder for me to keep warm.
     

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