Broken propane line

Discussion in 'Propane - Got Gas' started by jpr505, Oct 1, 2016.

  1. jpr505

    jpr505 New Member

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    Hi! New pup owner here. We bought it about 3 weeks ago. We have a camping trip coming up in 6 days. Just noticed our propane line is busted, not sure what I need to fix it. We don't absolutely have to have the propane since its not too cold out yet, but it would be nice to have since we will be at a dispersed site with no hookups. Thanks in advance!
     

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  2. terry1419

    terry1419 Active Member

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    Looks like it may have been cut. If you have the other piece that comes from the regulator, you could determine the length you need by measurement and take both pieces to the parts dept. of an RV dealer or to a propane supplier if you are in a rural area. Walmart has hoses for grills in their garden dept. but I don't think the fittings would be correct for your pup.
     
  3. Bigpopper2008

    Bigpopper2008 Member

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    Congratulations and Welcome to the Portal. Do NOT jury rig propane! get the right line and fittings, there are Camping World stores in Az..
     
  4. Kb2yht

    Kb2yht New Member

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    Propane is not magic, but do get good fittings and check all your joints with soap solution.

    Cooper tubing and flare fittings are best for working with it.
    Compression fittings work as well, and are easy, but cost more.

    They sell yellow fuel line at most home stores and good hardware stores. I would recommend using it over regular bare copper, it works the same but tends to prevent more stupid mistakes down the road.

    Dawn and water in a test botte is your most important tool... Test a joint that is deliberately lose first so you know what a leak looks like and smells like.


    Do not test in your garage!

    Do not test in your garage!

    Do not test in your garage!
    ...
    O and don't smoke while you test either.
     
  5. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

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    This is great advice. I've never done it myself, but getting ready to hit the propane system on my PUP this week, so glad I heard the tip just in time.
     
  6. Sonshine

    Sonshine Member

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    DO NOT USE COMPRESSION FITTINGS!! They are illegal to use on gas as they do not stand up to the pressure. Only use flared fittings for gas. If your not comfortable doing the repair yourself, go to an RV dealer or find a person who is licenced to work on gas appliances to do it for you. Just remember, better safe than sorry.
     
  7. ScoobyDoo

    ScoobyDoo New Member

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    I don't know the legal or not, on RVs, but the "do not stand up to the pressure." is bogus. I fail to understand why the copper is allowed for propane on RVs...
     
  8. rabird

    rabird Howdy!

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    Thermo rubber hose between the regulator and the PU from a RV store or mbsturgis.com
     
  9. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

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    Pardon my ignorance, but why would you buy ANY fittings? I would just buy a new hose with the fittings already on it, from an RV place.

    I would never trust myself to properly put fittings on a propane hose. There is a lot more at stake than fitting them on a cable tv line or something.

    I've replaced propane lines in the past, and just took it off at the each end, took it to the RV place, and got one with the same fittings already there. I don't know compression fittings from any other, but assumed the RV place wouldn't sell me a hose with illegal fittings on it.
     
  10. ScoobyDoo

    ScoobyDoo New Member

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    This is good advice, if it is the rubber line that is broken. If the break is in the copper line, not so much. Likely if you try to replace the whole line you will find the line goes thru places that the fittings will not fit. You have to run the line, then install the fitting.

    It is good to know your limits.

    Lines and Hoses. A hose, I would likely buy it ready made. Not because I don't understand the alchemy of putting one together, but because by the time you buy the hose and fittings putting it together you are working cheap. Running lines, on the other hand, try to get all the fitting in one trip, grab the tools, get to work...
     
  11. Customer

    Customer Well-Known Member

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    Simple fix. Buy a new line at your local RV dealer or LPG distributor.
     
  12. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

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    Lines/hoses .... they're all the same to me. [:D]

    It looks like a rubber whatever-it-is so should be easy enough.
     
  13. Kb2yht

    Kb2yht New Member

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    Oops, I had thought NFPA had finally adopted compression on copper lines.

    Yes, flares are the way to go. It's a cheap tool, and easy to do.
     
  14. jpr505

    jpr505 New Member

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    Thanks everyone! All fixed and ready to get on the road


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  15. Sonshine

    Sonshine Member

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    I apologize, I was wrong regarding the compression fittings! They are NOT illegal to use, they are STRONGLY discouraged from being used. (The company I work for does not allow us to use them, I thought this was due to NFPA rules).
    The issue with these fittings is due to expansion/contraction and them coming apart due to changes in pressure and vibration particularly in climates with large temp changes.
    For those who dont know, a compression fitting is a ball shaped piece of brass with a hole the size of the pipe through the middle of it. This ball is slid over the copper line and sandwiched between two brass or copper fittings that are screwed together. these fittings 'compress' the brass ball around the copper pipe forming a seal and holding the copper pipe in place.
    If the fittings are not tight enough or not placed in the right place then the fitting will not hold properly and the pipe can slide out of the ball and come apart. Even if the fittings are correct, there can be issues with expansion/contraction differences between the copper and brass due to changes in temp and the fittings can loosen up over time.
    When used on a water or air line, these fittings dont pose the same danger as on propane lines. Also, when used on a stationary system vrs a camper, there are differences due to vibration. The changes in pressure of the propane as it heats and cools can also play havoc with the fittings.
    With a flair fitting, the end of the copper line is spread apart or 'flaired' to fit the shape of the brass 'cone' on the fitting it is pressed against and held in place by another brass nut that has a matching flair. It is basically sandwiched between the 2 brass fittings and held there because the copper flair wont return to the tube shape and slide out of the nut. This makes a tighter and better seal.

    Again, I am sorry for jumping the gun with my answer. I am glad the op was able to solve his problem with little difficulty.
     

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