Burnt connector

Discussion in 'Lighting, Interior and Exterior' started by Amanda04m, Oct 15, 2016.

  1. Amanda04m

    Amanda04m New Member

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    [​IMG]. Found this while trying to figure out why our lights were not working. Can this just be fixed by a new connector or could it be more than that?


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  2. dion

    dion Member

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    There are two things that cause heat in a connector: excess current and excess resistance. (For the math inclined, the heat produced is given by i * i * r, where "i" is the current, and "r" is the resistance.)

    A connector should have very low resistance. If it is corroded, or poorly crimped onto the wire, the resistance may be higher than it should be, causing excess heat.

    If too much current is running through a connector, then ideally, a fuse should blow. And the wires themselves would probably start to get warm from the excess current.

    My guess is that the problem is excess resistance in the connector, and if that's the case, a new connector, properly installed, properly rated for the current it's handling, will solve the issue. But keep an eye on it. The new one should be completely cool.
     
  3. ScoobyDoo

    ScoobyDoo New Member

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    Easy check. Hold the white wire to white, the colored wires together. Light work? If so, you have found your problem. If not, keep looking.
    What is the cause of most house fires? (All permanent connections must be made inside a fire resistant box.) That connector has been hot. Did it all happen at once, or has there been resistance in that connection over time? Unless I could be sure it was a sudden thing, like a overload on that circuit, I would use another type of connector.
     
  4. Amanda04m

    Amanda04m New Member

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    So do you think when I plugged in a shop vac into the campers outlet that could've caused too much resistance? I tripped the house's breaker at the same time.


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  5. Amanda04m

    Amanda04m New Member

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    ScoobyDoo...we did do that and they worked. We also inspected all the fuses and they all looked fine. Think it was just my plugging in the vacuum that caused it? It seemed to stop working right after that.


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  6. ScoobyDoo

    ScoobyDoo New Member

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    The Vac could of caused a voltage drop. The lower voltage could no longer cross the high resistance, so it would arc as it dropped. After the arc, resistance could be higher because of burned contacts. If it was like my 12 shop vac, if the Cat was not purring it would dim the lights when starting...
    Or it could be unrelated.
     

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