Can a Load Range be too high?

Discussion in 'Tires / Brakes / Bearings / Axles' started by DIY Mom, May 11, 2017.

  1. DIY Mom

    DIY Mom New Member

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    I'm sure this is a ridiculous question, but does buying tires with higher load range than necessary damage anything? I could get away with load range C (barely) but I see a good deal on load range E tires. Would it hurt anything to get the load range E tires? Are they larger than the load range C when all other specs are the same? I get that I could split the difference and go with D, but if the E's are even slightly safer I'll pay the extra 10 bucks.
     
  2. Aladin Sane

    Aladin Sane I'd rather be camping

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    I have upped the load range on some trailer tires and never had a problem that way.
     
  3. cannotbackup

    cannotbackup Member

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    have a look at the "TIRE AND LOADING INFORMATION' stickeron your trailer (should be near front on roadside). The size of tires should be spec'd. On our PUP, the PSI rating shows also. Our used PUP came with C load range tire (50 PSI) which showed some wear. We are upgrading to load range D (65 PSI) which matches the PSI rating showing on the tire decal. The size of the tire will be the save regardless of load range. IMO of D range meets the requirements go with it...and save the extra 10 per tire for other PUP repairs
     
  4. DIY Mom

    DIY Mom New Member

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    My PUP is very old and that sticker is long gone... I had the trailer weighed, and it came in at 1800 lbs with all the camping stuff inside. The rating for the C tires is 1105 so a total of 2200. I might be getting carried away going for the E range tires... I just want to be sure my family (and every other family on the road near us) is safe.
     
  5. theseus

    theseus Centerville, OH

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    When you had it weighed was it loaded for going camping? If not, and you are coming in just under the C range, I would definitely move to load range D.

    Loading for a camping trip usually adds 3 to 400 lbs to my trailer. Water alone is 8 lbs a gallon. I have a 10 gallon tank. That's 80 lbs right there.
     
  6. sgip2000

    sgip2000 Member

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    Higher load range just costs more and will provide a rougher ride. No safety issues or anything like that.
     
  7. tombiasi

    tombiasi Well-Known Member

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    Make sure you have room in the wheel well if the tire has a higher profile.
     
  8. Fless

    Fless Active Member

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    The OP said when the Pup was weighed it was loaded with the camping gear. If you went to load range E and inflated to the tire's recommended pressure, the ride may be harsher than lower load range tires. No real safety issues unless you underinflate to compensate for the ride; that can cause tires to overheat and fail.

    Also, because of the tire pressures recommended for different load range tires, different wheels -- with a higher psi rating -- may be required and would most certainly be required for Load Range E (80psi).

    Interesting short article:
    https://www.etrailer.com/question-60785.html

    I think you're on the right track, going to a higher load range for a little safety headroom. In your case, I would think that new load range D tires and wheels in the same size that fits your Pup would be appropriate.
     
  9. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

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    You need to find and inflation table for the tires. You can run an E rated tire under the max 80 psi. The load it can carry is reduced, though.

    Also when talking weight, the tongue weight can be subtracted from the total trailer weight when figuring for tires.
     
  10. etrailerJohn

    etrailerJohn Member

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    Running a trailer tire with a Load Range that's higher than necessary won't be a problem. There will be little to no noticable change in the ride quality.

    Be sure to keep the tires fully inflated to the maximum pressure listed on the tire's sidewall, unlike passenger vehicle tires that have an acceptable pressure.

    For more information about trailer tires, just click the link provided below:

    https://www.etrailer.com/expert-68.html
     
  11. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

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    I would be good with lrc, (6pyl) but run with lre (10 ply). I air at 65 psi, tire max psi is 80. No issues, just a stronger tire.

    I have goodyear tires and use the load to psi chart for my tire pressure on page 9. See below link.

    There seems to be a lot of confusion in airing to max air pressure that is rated for max load of tire???

    http://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/tire-care-guide.pdf
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2017
  12. Winchested

    Winchested Member

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    The etrailer guy has it right.

    Trailer tires are not like car tires. Trailer tires are made to be ran at the listed pressure on the sidewall of the tire and not less. If it says 50 the you air to 50. If it says 65, air to 65 if it's 80 then you air to 80 at all times.

    LT truck tires is D and E range are completey different and you match the pressure to the actual load on the tire. For instance on my truck I have E rated BFG KO2's max of 65 psi but for load and comfort I only run at 48 front and 42 rear when empty and bump the rears up to match when towing.
     
  13. Winchested

    Winchested Member

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    So ST tires are to be ran at max psi all the time. LT tires are different and can be ran to match the load.
     
  14. mstrbill

    mstrbill Active Member

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    That's not true, you can find load inflation table for ST tires on the mfg'er websites for their tires. Like this one for Maxxis ST tires

    http://www.maxxis.com/trailer/trailer-tire-loadinflation-chart

    Most PUP tires are close to or at their load limits and that is why people say to inflate to the listed pressure for max load on the sidewall.
     
  15. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

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    I have Goodyear ST tires and follow the manufacture ST tire load to PSI chart. See page 9 Goodyear's ST chart for load to PSI at below web site. Goodyear you are not required to run max pressure unless you are running max load. If the etrailer guy told me to run my Goodyear ST tires at MAX PSI, I would not buy tires from him since he has no idea what hes talking about.

    I would follow the load to PSI chart or recommendation of your tire manufacture. I think they all have one. Just some seem to make it very hard to get you hands on their information.

    see page 9. http://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/tire-care-guide.pdf

    Also for what it's worth. My cars the auto manufacturer's gives you the recommendation for the tire PSI, which for me has never been the max air pressure listed on the tire. I think my current TV that PSI is listed on the door jam and owner manual by the auto manufacture. I'm sure they work very closely with the tire manufacturer to determine the PSI.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2017
  16. Winchested

    Winchested Member

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    Hmm from Triangle tire. *always run trailer tires at max inflation on sidewall.
     

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  17. theseus

    theseus Centerville, OH

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    I'm wondering if we are talking about the difference between radial tires and bias ply tires. I have heard bias ply needs to be fully inflated...
     
  18. 94-D2

    94-D2 Happy Campin'

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    You can't go wrong with inflating to max according to the sidewall data. A manufacture may instruct that because it is simple and they don't spend a lot of money in the legal department like some major brand manufacturer might. Since "inflate to max" can't misinterpreted by anyone, it probably limits liability vs providing load to pressure chart. It doesn't however provide the best features available for their product.

    All speculation on my part but one has to wonder why things are the way they are from one tire to another. They all have to meet a minimum standard for construction and materials and offer them for sale. It makes sense that the difference is propieter policy.
     

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