Cell booster???

kitphantom

Super Active Member
Platinum Supporting Member
Dec 26, 2009
13,930
Albuquerque, NM
What experience do you all have with cell phone boosters? I've had the weBoost Drive one in my wishlist on Amazon for a while, but it has seemed a bit more than I usually spend of something that will see occasional use.
What I'd like is to figure out how to move a booster between the trailer and the truck. Partly so that it's where I am, and partly because there are places that, even with a booster, I probably will have to drive to have it work.
One reason I'd like to have it is when Courtenay is off on his solo hiking and backpacking, and texts me updates. It was a good thing we were camped where we had good cell phone reception on his backpack last October, when he and a friend ended up hiking out 3 days early (in the middle of a snowstorm, no less), due to water supply issues. Both guys had inReach gadgets, and we wives were able to receives texts and updates as they slogged uphill, out of Grand Canyon. That got me to researching boosters. Last time we were at one of our favorite campsites in Colorado, we found that it takes a 9 mile drive to get real reception. I get some texts, sometimes multiple times for the same text, but it's not reliable enough to depend on for safety.
This past week at North Rim (Grand Canyon) campground, I saw many rigs with the booster antennas, but never got to talk to anyone about how they worked for them. Walking to a slightly better area of reception, or driving to the lodge/visitor center area (at the Rim, cell service actually is from South Rim, across the Canyon) can be an option. It rained so much and so heavily, if I'd had a way to make sure I could get into a campsite near Page or Kanab, I'd have left, much as I love Grand Canyon. Being able to find more weather info would have been good too. Other things have come up, and while being remote is great, being able to be reliably in touch with house/cat sitter (a.k.a. my niece), medical offices, etc. has been useful on a couple of trips this year.
 

Dnodoz

Active Member
Apr 15, 2020
129
We have had a Weboost RV for a couple of years. Unfortunately we don’t remote camp often so can’t vouch for it in the real boondocks. We find that if we have at least one bar of signal, turning on the Weboost will usually add at least another bar. It wouldn’t work at the bottom of Palo Duro Canyon since there is zero signal to boost.

I wish that the inside antenna broadcast better to our devices. We literally have to have a phone touching the antenna inside the camper to get the boost. We tend to set a phone next to the antenna and use that boosted phone as a hotspot to any other devices.

Ours is the version that is installed in the camper. There are more mobile versions that appear to be made to switch between vehicles. We’ve never tried one of those.

We use a directional antenna on an expandable painters pole attached to brackets on the side of our popup. I Added a coax port that connects to the boost unit mounted in a compartment in the camper. The boost unit is hardwired to our 12v system.
 

PopUpSteve

Administrator
Staff member
Gold Supporting Member
Dec 22, 2002
21,286
Southeastern PA
I was kind of surprised with the cell coverage I had during my cross-country trip. A booster would have helped in a few places but I'm kind of glad to have been off the grid in the others.
 

kitphantom

Super Active Member
Platinum Supporting Member
Dec 26, 2009
13,930
Albuquerque, NM
I was kind of surprised with the cell coverage I had during my cross-country trip. A booster would have helped in a few places but I'm kind of glad to have been off the grid in the others.
Like other cell phone use, the booster would be for our convenience and safety. We could choose to use it or not.
We often have better cell coverage than we used to, but the opposite has happened from time to time.
 




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