Checking unused brakes

Campgrandma

Member
Feb 4, 2021
75
Cibolo, TX
Pretty sure the previous owner never use the electric brakes on my 2004 Jayco Eagle select. What things do I need to do to check the brake system to make sure it’s fully functional before utilizing the brakes?
 

xxxapache

Super Active Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,446
The first thing I would do is hitch up and pull it around the block to see of the brakes work. After that, I would probably pull the drums and look for rust, put anti seize on the adjusters and any pivot points, put the drums back on and adjust the shoes.
 

Fish N Farm

Active Member
Aug 4, 2020
586
Pearland Tx
I would ask who ever does your auto repair and ask them if the work on electric brakes. If not find somebody that does. A place that works on AG trailers probably works on them. Not saying you can't check them yourself they are really simple. Look at some U-tube stuff. If you take the hubs off and decide to have some else do the repair you can't just slap the hub back on and tow it somewhere.
 

jeepster04

Active Member
Nov 23, 2010
284
Not much else to add other than I agree with checking to see if they work, then take it all apart and see if they have a bunch of rust built up inside the drum. Good time to clean/repack the bearings also.
 

xxxapache

Super Active Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,446
Satisfying my curiosity would be gained. I would go into the drum pulling job knowing I had working brakes.
 

xxxapache

Super Active Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,446
Would that knowledge influence what you did to the brakes?
Probably not. However, if I did the brake work before testing them and later found them not working, I'd be second guessing what I did, because I wouldn't have knowledge whether they were working or not to begin with.

My TT was used. It had good working brakes when I bought it. Shortly after pulling it home, I still pulled the drums to look at the pads and magnets , as well as the inside of the drums. I brushed off the dust, greased the adjusters and pivot points. Then I put the wheels back on and adjusted the shoes....Did it need any of it? Probably not.
 
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tombiasi

Super Active Member
Sep 1, 2012
6,749
Northwestern New Jersey
Probably not. However, if I did the brake work before testing them and later found them not working, I'd be second guessing what I did, because I wouldn't have knowledge whether they were working or not to begin with.

My TT was used. It had good working brakes when I bought it. Shortly after pulling it home, I still pulled the drums to look at the pads and magnets , as well as the inside of the drums. I brushed off the dust, greased the adjusters and pivot points. Then I put the wheels back on and adjusted the shoes....Did it need any of it? Probably not.
If it makes you feel better by all means do it. I would be planning a complete brake job, back plate magnets, shoes, and trace the wiring. I'd wait to see the hubs before I bought new hubs. If the brakes didn't work after that it would be my fault.
 

jmkay1

2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah
Oct 10, 2013
7,601
Northern Virginia
I agree with getting them checked prior to driving any long distance with them. I bought my popup and saw a recent inspection sticker so assumed someone did the work of inspecting the camper as per required in our state so figured everything was working and legal. Turns out while hauling the camper home 5 hours my breaks froze and essentially glued itself. Never having towed a camper with breaks I had no idea what was normal and the windows were up so didn’t get any strange smells. It was only putting my chalks in is when I discovered my hubs were hot as fire. So to say I hooked back up and drove it to the shop. Turns out my entire drum essembly were rust buckets and rust was preventing normal operation of the breaks. $600 later I got two new drum essembly and new barrings as they looked worn as well. Good luck.
 




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