Cleaning seasoned iron

Discussion in 'Dutch Oven Cooking' started by Natureangel, Oct 19, 2016.

  1. Natureangel

    Natureangel Everythings better outdoors...

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    Ok I have a couple pie irons and I know I can't use soap on them, I'm starting to look for a dutch oven but I'd like to know how to clean them. The inside cleans well with just using a plastic scrubby thingie but I have a hard time getting the soot off the outside.
    Any ideas?
     
  2. eoleson1

    eoleson1 Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    try using kosher salt and water to make a paste.
     
  3. jbirdt2001@yahoo.com

    [email protected] Active Member Gold Supporting Member

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    We have good luck with dishwashing detergent liquid or powder into a paste has a bit of bleach in it
     
  4. link81

    link81 New Member

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    i've had good luck with hot water, and steel wool scrubbies. ( i use the stainless ones, they last longer)
     
  5. yetavon

    yetavon everything is better around a campfire.

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    Mild soap, hot water, a soft scrubber or brush and elbow grease
     
  6. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    We don't use ours in in coals, but we do use mild soap regularly on the inside. We just know how to dry and grease (we use Crisco) them to keep them great.
    We used the plastic scrubbers for a long time, and still do, though can go through one scrubber washing a bunch of CI. We bought fine chain mail (Knapp made) scrubber that works great on the CI and stainless steel. That brand was unavailable when we bought one for a friend, so ended up buying one called the Ringer.
     
  7. vagov

    vagov Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    since they are sooted on the outside, I do like yatavon said, mild soap, hot water and a lot of elbow greese, the outside dosent have to be perfect as the inside is more important. after a good cleaning, I suggest heat drying it, I would then reseason on the gas grill, closing the lid with the handles sticking out on pie irons , as both halves should come apart, then put a light coat of oil, some use Crisco, but I prefer flax oil, wipe off as much as you can, too much oil will make it sticky. turn upside down on gas grill and bake at high setting 500 + degrees for a hour, let cool , then do again. after cools completely, I wipe down both inside and out with light coating of mineral oil as it dosent go rancid as most vegetables oils do , to prevent rust . place a clean paper towel between the pot and the lid, or both sides of pie iron , letting a small amount of air to enter pot and store until next time.. so far this method has been working good for me. [:D]
     
  8. TomSwenson

    TomSwenson New Member

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  9. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

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    Watched the video. Good information. What do you store the cast iron in after that? Do you put it in a cloth bag or plastic container? I'm basically asking about my pie irons. I feel like they should be in something.

    My daughter didn't season hers (didn't know better) and then, when they got it back out of the shed, it was covered in rust. I read online to scrub the rust off with steel wool, then season. I could only find the steel wool with the soap so I bought these other metal looking scrubbie things. I got most of the rust off, then seasoned a few times.

    Even so, it looks like the rust is trying to come back on hers some. Any suggestions? Thanks.
     
  10. nomorecoop

    nomorecoop Member

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    Nylon brush and hot water
     
  11. kstephens

    kstephens Member

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    As others have mentioned a nylon brush and hot water. I found some plastic scrub pads (similar to steel wool - but plastic) that work great.

    I keep my dutch oven in a case made for it. I always roll up a paper towel and close the lid on it (half in and half out) to create a gap for air to flow, and zip it up in the bag. I set my skillet upside on this set up in the cabinet under one of the dinette seats.
    http://www.lodgemfg.com/outdoor-accessories/camp-oven-tote-bags.asp
     
  12. Natureangel

    Natureangel Everythings better outdoors...

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    Great info! Thanks for sharing.
     
  13. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    As I commented above, we bought the Ringer brand for a friend, who likes it. We have two of another brand, Knapp made, one for home and one in the camper. I like the finer Knapp one, but it I could only buy the Ringer, I would.
    We use them on the cast iron, as well as stainless pots and pans.
     
  14. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

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    I'm going to have to try again with nylon. I Googled initially, as my only experience with cast iron has been pie irons, and I have always known to season them first. The information I found had me cleaning the rust off with metal.

    Honestly, if I can't get the rust to stay off this time, I'm going to let her just toss it (like she wanted to do to begin with) and buy a new one. They are only $14. I did way more than $14 worth of work getting it back the first time. After I got the rust off, I seasoned it very thoroughly with Crisco, 3 or 4 times. Then we used them all last weekend and here comes the rust back through again! Not bad, but I can see a hint of orange.

    I had a couple of these 20-30 years ago, when my kids were little, and I thought I remember wrapping the iron ends in fabric or canvas of some kind when I put them away. Not sure who ever told me to do that, but going to sew up some rough covers for these new ones.
     
  15. nineoaks2004

    nineoaks2004 Every meal is a picnic and every Day is a holiday

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    Old canoe campers trick Coat the OUTSIDE with soap prior to cooking, then the soot washes right off (works with other pots and pans too
     
  16. jlynn58

    jlynn58 Active Member

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    Had ours for about 10 years. We have 2 pie irons, a hot dog cooker, hamburger cooker, and a bread cooker all made by Rome. Have never cleaned them outside or three inside.
     
  17. silvermickey2002

    silvermickey2002 Morris County, NJ Gold Supporting Member

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    I only use a nylon brush and plastic scrapper to clean the DO and pans. But, I do not use olive oil as the guy in the video did. I use the Lodge seasoning spray (Canola oil).

    Just a note, olive oil will turn rancid over time. I know this because someone in our troop cleaned a few DO's at the end of the school year (June) and in September I went to go use them and they had a really nasty smell. Ended up having to scrub and cook them in the BBQ to burn the stuff off.
     
  18. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    @ silvermickey 2002 Olive oil seems to go rancid more quickly than other oils, but we've had the oil or Crisco on our CI go rancid over time. We have a large collection of CI that we use at home, and we sometimes end up cleaning it when we want to use a piece that has been idle for a while.
     
  19. mpking

    mpking Well-Known Member

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    This was more of an AHA moment for myself that I wanted to share.

    Most modern Propane BBQ's have Cast Iron Grates. The same seasoning can apply to them.

    I just scrubbed the crap out of my grates to get all the rust off, and then seasoned them in my oven. (I have a VERY good vent hood that vents directly outside). Did it 3 times, and they look almost brand new. Previously I had not done anything special other than just crank the grill to MAX temp after using it, but over the last year or so the grates have been looking very rough.
     

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