Cooler Corn?

Discussion in 'I Smell Something Cooking!' started by electronflux, Oct 4, 2011.

  1. electronflux

    electronflux Member

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    Email sent to me by a friend:


    The simple genius of this method for cooking loads of corn on the cob perfectly.

    I was hepped to it while visiting my family in Maine. Short story: We like corn on the cob. And with eight adults at the table, that means a couple of dozen ears. We would have used the lobster pot to cook them all, but the lobster pot was busy steaming lobster. Then my sister, a capable Maine cook with years of camping experience says "let's do cooler corn!" Before I can ask "what the hell is cooler corn?" a Coleman cooler appears from the garage, is wiped clean, then filled with the shucked ears. Next, two kettles-full of boiling water are poured over the corn and the top closed. Then nothing. When we sat down to dinner 30 minutes later and opened it, the corn was perfectly cooked. My mind was blown. And I'm told that the corn will remain at the perfect level of done-ness for a couple of hours. Turns out, Cooler Corn is pretty well known among the outdoorsy set But for those of us who avoid tents as much as possible, it's perfect for large barbecues and way less of mess than grilling. In fact, I may even buy another cooler just so I'm ready for next summer. Now that I'm in the know.
     
  2. MA_Kev

    MA_Kev New Member

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    Gonna have to give it a try!!
     
  3. wapwap

    wapwap New Member

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    Depending on how much your making - I have a little square cooler like this one:

    http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=igloo+wheeled+cooler&hl=en&safe=strict&noj=1&prmd=imvns&biw=1495&bih=873&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=1989008513590641532&sa=X&ei=_xiLTozDFoLX0QHgyKTyBA&ved=0CHwQ8wIwBTgK#

    We've done cooler corn for family reunions at parks. We dump the water in before we leave the house and it's done just after arriving and stays yummy good well beyond the time everyone eats. The first time we got some wild questions about what was going on. You just have to make sure that the corn is covered by water, or just about covered, and don't open it until you're ready to eat.
     
  4. Yooperwannabe

    Yooperwannabe Active Member

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    What a brillant way to cook corn. Yes, I will be doing this one, maybe this weekend at the campground.
    Thanks for sharing.
     
  5. mhc77

    mhc77 New Member

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    maybe a silly question but...does the water have to go in all at once?

    we don't bring many pans with us camping, could i heat water...dump it in....heat more...dump it in...etc? or will all that opening and closing mess something up?
     
  6. wapwap

    wapwap New Member

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    We usually like our corn buttered and salted. We've got a long, tight-sealing food storage box that fits most corn cobs. We put some butter in the box (usually a stick or two cut into a few pieces), close it up, and toss the box on top of the water before closing the cooler. When the corn is done, the butter is melted and the cobs fits right inside for buttering. The other method that we are appreciating more now that we have DH is to lay a stick of butter (yup the whole thing) across the top of a piece of bread. To butter your corn, you lay it on top of the butter and roll. The bread help to catch any butter drippings when the corn melts it.

    Nope, it'll be just fine. You want to keep the steam/heat in the cooler as much as possible, so don't leave it open too long. The corn takes a little longer to cook since it's not all covered at one time, but it works (we've done it).
     
  7. CaliforniaPoppy

    CaliforniaPoppy California and beyond!

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    Personally, I wouldn't do it. Hot plastic + food is not a combination I'm comfortable with. I don't need any more chemicals added to my food.
     
  8. Bama Camper1

    Bama Camper1 New Member

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    Why would you think the plastic would contaminate the food? Most of us use a microwave and plastic bowls to cook in everyday.
     
  9. JeepMama

    JeepMama New Member

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    I think, and someone can correct me if I get it wrong, there is something called BPA that releases into food when plastics are heated. In the past few years there was a big change in baby bottles and sippy cups to remove that chemical from the manufacturing process.
     
  10. Idahawk

    Idahawk " Esta Perpetua "

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    Is that something that would be in a food storage device such as a cooler ?
     
  11. electronflux

    electronflux Member

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  12. CaliforniaPoppy

    CaliforniaPoppy California and beyond!

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    The interior shell of most coolers is made of polypropylene and the outsides are usually high-density polyethylene. While polypropylene can withstand higher heats and is not known to release BPA, manufacturers such as Igloo specify that their coolers are not for use with hot liquids.

    Bama Camper1, most people I know no longer heat foods in plastic. There are all kinds of chemicals that can be released when plastic is heated. BPA is the one most studied. It is an environmental estrogen, or endocrine disruptor, which can mimic the effects of sex hormones. This can promote cancer cell growth and decrease sperm counts. Heat makes the rate of BPA leaching skyrocket. And, if you stick plasticware in the dishwasher, the alkali detergent can cause further leaching.
     
  13. Unstable_Tripod

    Unstable_Tripod Well, there's your problem!

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    My DW has a cousin who got into that whole area of food additives and cross-contamination between food and storage containers. She was horrified at what she found and now only uses glass containers to store food. She only cooks in microwaveable glass containers or in metal pots and pans on the stove. She tossed all plastic containers out and will not eat anything that was ever in one of them.
     
  14. JamesRL

    JamesRL New Member

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  15. jamesmc321

    jamesmc321 Member

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    Has her cousin ever eaten out at a restaurant...lol.. the cousin wouldn't do that either if they knew what was going on in the kitchen [:D]

    Thank GOODNESS the gov't is around to fund all this research....what would we do without them.
     
  16. JamesRL

    JamesRL New Member

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    Well you of course can make up your own mind, and act accordingly.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2009/01/28/f-health-bisphenol.html

    In one study, 90% of Americans had BPA in their body. Those with the highest levels were three times more likely to have heart disease and 2.4 times more likely to have diabetes. Studies with animals showed increases in breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. Pregnant women with high BPA levels are more likely to have aggressive or hyperactive daughters.

    I'm not saying I'm going to be hypervigilant. I'm not panicing. But I think it makes sense to reduce the exposure where possible.
     
  17. ken in md

    ken in md New Member

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    Well the cooler corn thread has taken an unfortunate turn!! I guess I will stick to grilling it over an open fire (at the risk of starting a carcinogen discussion).

    Seriously though, BPAs sound nasty, so thanks for the info. I am just thinking of all the kids lunches we pack in plastic containers everyday...damn. At least we dont heat them.
     
  18. JamesRL

    JamesRL New Member

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    The first step the Canadian government took in 2008 was to ban BPA in baby bottles, which makes some sense since the milk is often heated and a baby is more vulnerable.
     
  19. Unstable_Tripod

    Unstable_Tripod Well, there's your problem!

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    No, she refuses to eat anywhere (restaurants, other folks' homes, etc.) unless she knows for certain that the food they serve was never in contact with the offending plastics. She also buys all of her stuff fresh from local providers and/or in bulk, without all of the packaging.
     
  20. tjwagers

    tjwagers Member

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    sadly, my wife is also one like the previously mentioned cousin.....no cooler corn for me [:(]
     

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