Custom 2" receiver for my Rockwood 2560G for bike rack

Discussion in 'Cargo Carriers / Bike Racks / Other Storage Option' started by teksavy, Oct 7, 2021.

  1. teksavy

    teksavy New Member

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    Hi:

    I needed the perfect project to justify the purchase of a multi process welder from Harbor Freight and a custom 2" receiver for the back of my Rockwood 2506 tent trailer was it.

    I wanted to use my existing Kuat 2" receiver bike rack and thought this would be a good solution.

    Here is what my friend and I came up with and it turned out really good.

    However, I will say that the sway of the trailer (previously it had none) increased a lot. Nothing dangerous, but too much for my liking. In looking at the pictures, I'm not surprised at all, look at how far the bikes are from the back of the trailer and how high they are. In addition, I need to weigh the tongue weight with and without the bike rack. I suspect I'm taking close to 70 pounds off of the tongue weight due to the single axle acting like a see-saw.

    I may just need to relegate the receiver to much lighter loads like a cooler or something.

    We we used common 2" angle iron, 4 foot 2" receiver from eTrailer and various smaller mild steel pieces. We designed it so it wasn't permanent and could be removed. In addition, it is above the axle and pushed back behind the bumper to minimize departure angle scraping.

    20211001_124402.jpg 20210926_181830.jpg 20210926_181823.jpg 20210926_134058.jpg 20210926_134035.jpg 20210925_153326.jpg 20210925_133726.jpg
     
  2. Dave Fro

    Dave Fro New Member

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    Very cool project!
     
  3. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    Good job installing. Yes, bikes on the back are taking too much weight off the tongue causing sway. It’s the reason many popup owners use something similar to a pro rack. It’s a rack that can attach to the A frame of the tongue and back tires rests on the popup. It keeps the weight on the tongue where it’s critical.
     
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  4. bols2Dawall

    bols2Dawall S.W. Ontario

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    or simply move some heavier items from behind the wheels inside toward the front . You might want to see if you can move the rack as close to the back of the trailer as possible .
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2021
  5. davido

    davido Well-Known Member

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    It's not only a matter of increasing tongue weight. It's also a matter of decreasing weight at the back.

    Think of a pendulum. You could put more weight at the top of a pendulum, but as long as there's weight at the bottom it's mostly going to continue to function properly. Well, what's proper for a pendulum is improper for a trailer. Additionally, though you've done a fantastic job with the welding, it's questionable as to whether the frame is really up to the task of supporting 70 pounds of bikes bouncing at the back.

    That trailer has support walls on the sides of the roof. It's a good candidate for a roof top bike rack.
     
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  6. curt86iroc

    curt86iroc New Member

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    or just put them on the roof of your TV. much easier all the way around...
     
  7. teksavy

    teksavy New Member

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    Thank you for the replies everyone! We used a 4 foot long 2" receiver to avoid the 70 pound bikes bobbing up and down and the rear frame member- it is spreading the load along half of the frame.

    The sway is the killer and I think I'm going to have to look into a prorack deal. I was avoiding trying to put anything on the roof as I don't know what it can support. I guess I need to do more research.

    -Ed
     
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  8. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    It was well done, just not practical. Ac is rear of the tires also. And a smaller tv to boot. A lot will say that has nothing to do with it, but vibrations carry and transfer all the way up, the bigger tv can handle it better because of the bigger wheelbase. And , i am beeing honest, it was really well done. Almost perfection.
     
  9. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Un-Supported Member

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    There's about 30 pounds of steel in just the hitch setup.
     
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  10. Mike G

    Mike G New Member

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    Thanks for this! I was actually just considering how I could mount a receiver to the back of my Rockwood 1980 for Bikes to use my existing rack (verses spending ~$1000+ for a roof setup) but I too was worried about unweighting the tongue. I also was considering the smaller spare tire rack option, but the bracket that holds the tire on doesn't seem sturdy enough.
     
  11. theseus

    theseus Living the Darkside... Silver Supporting Member

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    Install a friction sway bar on your pup. Instead of bolting the mount to the side of the frame, you could weld it:wink:

    That will take care of the sway you have and is a cheap solution.
     
  12. Chris I

    Chris I Member

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    You can mitigate the sway by loading as much gear as possible at the extreme front end of the trailer. Is the trailer frame rated for this, though? That's a lot of bending force on that frame, over the single axle.
     
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  13. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    If you are going to install a rear receiver on the trailer, 1 you have to install it properly by tying it into the main frame rails (not the weak frame assembly) then 2 you have to offset the weight of not only the added receiver weight(along with the weight of the steel used to install it) plus the weight of whatever you are carrying on the back.. all this weight has to be offset by adding/moving weight forward of the axle(s) or add to the tongue..

    Proper loading is the first step to reducing sway, adding a sway bar is used to eliminate as much sway as possible AFTER proper loading.. Otherwise using an anti sway bar is like using a bandaid to block a hole in the Hoover Dam.. works good for a bit, then all hell breaks loose..
     
  14. generok

    generok Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Ok, I'll be the guy that posts the link to "that video" this time:



    GREAT fab job!
     
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  15. davekro

    davekro Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    I remember seeing this video soon after I got my pup when researching about weight distribution/loading’s effect on towing. Nothing like ‘the video is worth 1 million words.“ :shocked: Hopefully, all new very short wheel base trailer owners have seen this video. The other factor (often) way more important than one might initially not even realize, is how the sway problem Significantly increases with each 5 mph increase from say 55 to 70 mph. Of course all this is all second nature to most of our Portal community members. But two new Pup towers, it is important to become more aware of.

    All towing is not the same. I have towed a ski boat most of my adult life (doing the math, 40 years... god that reminds me I’m getting old ) first several years was a 16’ low profile outboard, the rest a 20’ tournament ski boat (mid engine direct drive) on a tandem trailer. The wheels were much further from the hitch and 15” tires, so sway was never an issue, even when the boat was filled gear for a week long Shasta house boat trip, once per year.

    Last trip with our Pup, we changed or normal load plan (That I had done a tongue weighing to arrive at) due to not bringing Firewood that had been stored at back of Pup. DW would roll eyes when I wanted to take time to weigh tongue after we were all packed and ready. In her defense, I am the cause of leaving later than planned, trying to get that last Pup ‘To Do’ item squeezed in.
    Thanks for posting the video, not just because I have that same blue Mustang (except V6 convertible not V8 GT). [Guitar] She was here just now and I showed her the video. She now gets it why I take the time consider weight distribution! Trips that I have not done a weighing when I was unsure my tongue weight % was in the 10-15% range, I do a test on the road on a flat, straight freeway with no cars too near me. Starting at 55mph, give the steering wheel a wiggle to make the trailer swerve some. If it sways to one side, ~ half as much to the opposite side, then returns to center, I know I am good at that speed, which should be the case even if my tongue is somewhat light. If I get a similar or close response at 60, 65, and 70mph, I know the weight % is good. On the last trip, my test yielded too much sway at 65 &70 so I knew to stay at 55 and be more vigilant. Even with a way too light tongue weight % at 70 mph on a flat, straight road with no wind, no big rigs passing or passed, there is no sway. The severity of sway potential is only discovered when wind, road curves or extremely so, if the tow vehicle needs to make an evasive maneuver*.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2021

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