Daily Set-up and Take-down

Discussion in 'Camper Pre-Purchase Questions' started by lorirobertson72@gmail.com, Sep 16, 2016.

  1. idler

    idler Member

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    I set up my Quicksilver 6.0 on my own, but I got that one because there are many solo owners of the smaller size. The larger ones really work better with two people setting up. There are people on the Livin Lite forum who say they can set the 8.1 and 10.0 solo. I thought that I would get tired of doing it over and over so opted for a one bunk version.

    I'm mighty jealous of people who push a button and have their roof go up, but it's nice to not need a TV larger than my Subaru. And, it's wonderful to know I won't have wood rot. Ever. I wish I could do the carpentry I see in the rebuilds, but I can't.
     
  2. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

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    When I Googled Quicksilvers, they don't appear to have any of the creature comforts in them - sink, stove, refrigerator, potty, air conditioning, etc. Not sure if that holds true with all of them or not.

    Even though they look really easy to set up (I watched a Youtube video) I think I would rather have a few additional steps and have everything I need inside. Especially if you were only staying one night in a place, you wouldn't want to have to set up a lot of outdoor things on the site.

    I'm 52 and in bad physical health, and I can both set up and break down on my own. I know that because I practiced doing it. [;)] Things didn't go smoothly until I learned how to do it properly, and in what order. But I can do it now. Even crank up is fairly easy.

    I believe if I were in the OP's position, I would just go for the PUP I wanted and opt to stay in places more than one night at a time. [:D]
     
  3. Ryanm

    Ryanm Member

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    It looks like the way you're going to use it is playing to a pup's weaknesses instead of its strengths.

    Setting up and breaking down the pup is easy. Setting up and breaking down the campsite is not. We live outside when we're camping: cooking, eating, realxing, all that is done outside. Our kitchen setup is pretty elaborate, we usually bring a couple boats, four bikes and several chairs. Everything has to get unpacked even if we aren't going to use it that night- deciding not to use the boat doesn't save time when you've got to take it off the pup to set up anyway.

    When I was a kid we had a TT. It was great for short stops- we would even pull off into a rest area or a parking lot to have lunch in the camper.
     
  4. generok

    generok Well-Known Member

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    Sounds GREAT to me! Especially when it is raining, which is very often here.
     
  5. dion

    dion Member

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    Most have a sink. Some have a stove. Air conditioning is an option. Only the 14XLP has a refrigerator and toilet. None have showers.

    Of the options you list there, our 10.0 only has a sink, and we rarely bother to connect the water lines for it -- certainly not for a one-nighter. So I guess your assessment is accurate for our trailer and the way we use it, but there are other Quicksilvers for which isn't not so true.

    Certainly there are tradeoffs in any type of setup, and we all choose what we prefer and live with the benefits and downsides of our choices. But usually, the only thing we set up outside is our coleman stove, and we'd do that regardless of what we had built into a pop-up trailer, because we frequently camp in bear country and don't want to get food odors in our canvas. The food preparation gear all stays in the tow vehicle, never in the trailer. We set it up, cook, eat, and clean up before going to bed, leaving a clean picnic table to avoid feeding the critters. Though sometimes, depending on our schedule, energy level, and where we're camping, we may eat dinner at a restaurant and use the campsite only for sleeping.
     
  6. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

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    This is why the OP has to decide how they will be using the PUP. If it's basically just for sleep, I would go with the easiest set up I could find.

    Since we no longer camp in bear country, I cook inside, aside from campfire cooking.

    I personally would not set up anywhere for just one night. Minimum is two, but 5 or more is the norm. We always have a lot of the site set up as well. However, if I were going to set up for just one night, I would want everything already in place.

    Maybe a model with an electric lift would serve the OP well? It's almost impossible to make recommendations without knowing her priorities.
     
  7. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    Set up is a chore. Having a popup with the slideout adds another level of complication and you sure can't rush or mistakes happen. Mistakes in setup/takedown could lead to ripped canvas or worse. My popup is still new to me only used it 3 times and sets up differently than my old pup without the slideout. I have to use a checklist right now until I get this process down so still takes me a long time. Personally if I had a pup and the time for a long trip I would probably break down my trip by staying in a hotel vrs set/up take down every night. I see myself staying a couple of nights on one place and motel another night until I get to my destination. A few years ago I went to Maine the longest camping trip I went on. I stayed in RI for three nights, did sightseeing and spent time with family. Drove to Acadia NP stayed 5 nights and then 3 nights in NH and stopped for a night in RI before my trip home. That is more my style of camping. Take my time, see the area relax before having to rush off. I think for me if I was to do just on overnight stay, I would choose the A frame or TT. Where as long as you don use your fridge you can remain hooked up to you TV. Vrs the popup which you have to have some sort of levelness for the lift system to prevent binding. Just my [2C]
     
  8. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    Except for the part about my back no longer doing the actual set-up of the pup, even that didn't take much more (or as much) time as stopping in hotels on the road. I usually end up with a room at the far end of a hallway, and even with the luggage racks, it takes a lot of time and effort to haul even overnight supplies into a hotel, at least for us. There are things that we leave in the camper or TV in camp, but take inside a hotel, either for security or in case they're needed.
    It all depends on situation and abilities of the people camping. I'll still take overnight stops in the camper over hotels, under most conditions. The pups and (now) TT have had a bed tailored to our needs, and our supplies are easy to reach. Plus, for stopping while doing mileage, staying in a campground gives us a chance to stretch our legs, and eat our own food. (We do occasionally go out to eat, but having the choice is great.)
    However, unless you are doing very short days of driving, changing campsites every day means seeing less of each spot. If all you want to see of any national park, for example, are the highlights, it is possible to do so with daily campsite shifts. I see people arrive and set up camp in the early afternoon, then go off to see the sites, before pulling out in the early morning. I do understand limited vacation time, too, so you need to decide how much of a visit you may want to make at sites. There are many places where it is possible to see the highlights in a relatively short time, especially if one is not a hiker.
     
  9. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

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    FWIW, and I realize I'm a little late to the party here, it would depend on how many people we're traveling with. If it's just me and the DW, daily setup/takedown would be a chore so we'd probably look at something like an A-Liner or keep the pup and stay for no less than two days at a time.
     
  10. Ryanm

    Ryanm Member

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    Yeah, the "camping" load plan isn't the same as the "hotel" load plan. Switching and juggling is aggravating.

    OTOH, "hotel" setup is in an air conditioned, well lit lobby out of the rain and break down is a lot more leisurely. Some of them even throw in a continental breakfast.
     
  11. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

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    Hotels also come with a much larger price tag. And occasionally bed bugs. [:(O]

    When we go to Disney World, although I like and trust their resorts, I will often pay more to stay at their campground, Fort Wilderness.

    With FL resident and passholder specials, I can get the value resorts for around $65 per night. Tent / pop-up sites run about that, but are harder to get. Premium sites going for closer to $100 per night.

    This is a perfect example of where a person's priorities come into play. For me, the campsite is preferred for several reasons.

    1 - Food is very expensive, and not all that great, at Disney World. We can take the bus or boat from the parks, back to the campsite for meals. We have a full kitchen as well as a grill to prepare our own. This has become more important for me since being diagnosed with kidney disease and requiring a special diet.

    2 - We have our own beds, with our own sheets and pillows. Hotels usually only have two beds that need to be shared. Strange beds, sheets, and pillows are not conducive to a good night sleep. (Except on Royal Caribbean ships, but that's a whole other topic [LOL])

    3 - When you return to your room after a day at the parks, there is nothing to do except sit there and watch TV. A campsite keeps you outside and enjoying vacation until bedtime.


    From this original post it doesn't look like vacation time is limited. Not sure why they would need to set up daily.

    Some assumptions:

    1 - OP are teachers with summers off or retired and want to be sort of reverse snowbirds, getting away during the hot FL summers.

    2 - Possibly own a TV that can only handle a small trailer.

    3 - Potentially on a budget and don't want to do hotels.

    So, I think the consensus is that while a PUP can be set up and taken down daily, it's certainly not ideal. If I were traveling for a couple of months, and had limited tow ability, I would just plan to spend a few nights per spot.
     

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