Dealing with fallen tree on road

Discussion in 'Taking Your Camper Off Road' started by Brian2020, Sep 23, 2013.

  1. Brian2020

    Brian2020 Member

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    That's what I was thinking, a V cut, then go straight in. The v cut of course requires 2 cuts instead of 1, thus the arms like pistons. I don't have those arms, but since I expect to only have to do this in an emergency situation, I imagine I'll eventually get it done. Hopefully will never happen, but if it does, you can be sure I will post the pix to this forum ;-).
     
  2. Brian2020

    Brian2020 Member

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  3. SteveM_CT

    SteveM_CT Member

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    We had a major storm here about 5 years ago. One of the towns north of here gets mini tornadoes. Power was out in that town and much of the surrounding area.

    I usually take the highway and get off in that town and head south, but can take a route home that has only 3 stop lights: the one at my office and two more a mile up the road from my house.

    I opted for the backroads, figuring that with the power out, there was no way I was going to get off the highway.

    Came across a tree, about 6" in diameter across the road. Couldn't move it (didn't have a tow rope). Had to take the highway.

    Took 2-1/2 hours to get home on a route that should have taken 30 minutes. Half an hour was spent on the exit ramp.

    Ever since then, I carry a tree saw in the back of my car.

    You probably need one for cutting firewood anyway, so get one, put something over the blade, like a slit piece of rubber hose and stash it in the camper.

    Steve
     
  4. Unstable_Tripod

    Unstable_Tripod Well, there's your problem!

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    I carry an axe, hatchet and bow saw. I also have a tow strap with which I could drag smaller stuff out of the way.
     
  5. inthedirt

    inthedirt Active Member

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    Well, you could always just stay put. I mean, you have a source of shelter, heat, and food.......so where's the problem? I call that an extended vacation. Personally, I never go into the bush without a means of protecting myself (and a way to "gather" food, if necessary). This just makes it easier to stay away from work.....longer.
     
  6. kpic

    kpic New Member

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    Although no one enjoys admitting it, sometimes you are stuck and can't do a thing about it.
     
  7. rick13

    rick13 Member

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    Typical spring trail run here in Colorado:

    [​IMG]

    Doesn't look that big/bad (10-12" dia) but most of the upper portion (about 30') was wedged btw other in-ground trees. Took about 1 hour with an axe and then some recovery gear (straps, d-rings) to pull the root-end to one side of the road.

    I carry a come-along, a full axe, a hatchet, and during spring runs a large bow saw (my favorite all-purpose saw). I have friends that always have a chain saw, and boy does that make easy work of things, but I'm just not there yet. These days it's not just the price of the item, but the weight, that goes in to my "what do I need" calculations!
     
  8. beemerboy

    beemerboy New Member

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    If you are boondocking and you already have a generator, you probably have an extension cord, you could use an electric chainsaw. Sure, go ahead and laugh. But for an occasional use, they aren't bad.

    Keep in mind these points: no gas/oil mix to go bad when you are not using it no need to worry if the carb gets plugged, it can sit on your shelf covered in dust for years and still start with a push on the trigger. You can put in your car and not smell gas. You only have one small gas motor to maintain (the genny).

    Ya, you have to be careful where you put the cord when you use it but you should be careful no matter what power tool you use.

    I have an electric chainsaw and I've used it for cleanup around the yard after storms and it sits in my back entry - sometimes for a year before I need it again.
     
  9. Pointy Trailer

    Pointy Trailer Member

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    Bucking Blowdown

    This guy is a professional. We, yes I worked too but am much slower so chunked up and tossed the pieces off, ran across this on the way to our "office" :). The equipment was a ways up the road and wouldn't start once he hoofed it up there so we lopped up more till it got dark.

    If I am boondocking locally, I have a chainsaw along of a size that will handle most anything. I know how to use it.
    Blowdown is treacherous and there's some I won't touch. I've been knocked onto my butt after misjudging the tension in a blowdown. Around here, it is likely to get lopped up quickly by firewooders or hunters, depending on the season. I went out with the road crew after we had windy events like last night, and we usually would end up widening what people had already cut open.

    You can do a lot with a pruning saw and axe.

    My worry is that just like guns, chainsaws are stolen a lot. I keep it hidden and locked up. Nobody expects women to have saws like I've got so if it is hidden out of sight, it is pretty safe.
     
  10. steved

    steved New Member

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    I've seen lots of campers with electric chainsaws, they use them to cut up dead fall for campfires. Although not everyone takes a generator camping...I carried a Sawzall with 12" blades to get the same result, but no generator.

    I run my Stihl probably three to four months a year cutting firewood, so its not a big deal for me. But not every one can handle a chainsaw either. I also carry a small camp axe, which might take a while on a bigger tree; but it would eventually get the job done.
     
  11. bigdad

    bigdad Well-Known Member

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    I use the Force [:D]
     
  12. phalynx

    phalynx Member

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    We came across a fallen tree during our squirrel hunt this weekend and while I could have gone off the trail and around it, that would have violated the Tread Lightly principles. Never go off the road because the next person will do the same and eventually this will lead to erosion problems; this is one of the reasons they're closing down trails to the public.

    So I strapped it out of the way. In this case, a chain would have been better to handle abrasion, but my strap wasn't damaged.

    [​IMG]
     

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