Disagreement

Oldspurs

Active Member
Jan 2, 2022
276
Central Texas
When you fisrt buy a camper, i did it also, you get every cool looking gadget for it. Most of those things never get used. I did it also. I had to have this and that. Most of it was given away or sits in the garage unused.
I remember those days, buying cool looking gadgets, every one I ran across. Then as the aging process takes over I realized I did not need the cool gadgets, never used them, was always looking through them to get to needed items. We have parred down to what is required to enjoy the camp. All other material was given away. Our PUP is larger than most, it has a lot of storage space most of which has nothing in it. As xxxapache stated, three weeks from the saddlebags, will teach you how to pack lightly. All items should have multiple uses, except for underwear. lol Enjoy the camp. See you on the trail.
 

Sjm9911

Super Active Member
May 31, 2018
12,450
Nj
I just bought another thing I cant live without, lol. Didn't need it, shouldn't have bought it , but I have the space in the TT and it was reduced. So, I am not the proud parent of a table top smoker. 137$ at wallmart on clearance. Usally sells for like 300$ did I need it. No. Will I use it, hopefully. I love the pellet smoker at home and this will be great for rallys. So, I still get stuff I dont really need that takes up tons of space.
 

Tom and Teresa

Active Member
Jun 18, 2019
136
Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
I just bought another thing I cant live without, lol. Didn't need it, shouldn't have bought it , but I have the space in the TT and it was reduced. So, I am not the proud parent of a table top smoker. 137$ at wallmart on clearance. Usally sells for like 300$ did I need it. No. Will I use it, hopefully. I love the pellet smoker at home and this will be great for rallys. So, I still get stuff I dont really need that takes up tons of space.
Good for you!!
 

Susan Premo

Super Active Member
Nov 5, 2020
1,037
Minnesota
I saw a vlog by a couple that bought an A-frame camper a few years ago…they give updates every so often. I was blown away when they said they are glad they bought their camper, but it’s really only useful for a weekend or so at a time because of the storage issues. Blew my mind…my husband and I have taken extended trips (up to three weeks) in ours and have absolutely LOVED it! When we first bought it, I spent a lot of time thinking about how to increase storage and make optimal use out of the storage provided. What about the rest of you A-frame owners? Clear containers and command hooks/items became my go to. I measured and bought containers that fit perfectly in our under bed storage and under our dinette seat. Our A-frame provides so much outside storage too. Makes me sad that a camper that makes driving and getting to places so much more safely is being touted that it can only be used so sparingly.
Do you mean aliner? Ours is a 2011, it doesn't have a lot of space to stow stuff, my husband hogs a lot of it, but I do have a nice soft sided container that has sections and stows under the bed. I like it a lot it's a great lightweight little camper. Really want to go all solar, hope to next spring.
 

kcsa75

Super Active Member
Gold Supporting Member
Sep 9, 2013
5,927
Kansas City
I just bought another thing I cant live without, lol. Didn't need it, shouldn't have bought it , but I have the space in the TT and it was reduced. So, I am not the proud parent of a table top smoker. 137$ at wallmart on clearance. Usally sells for like 300$ did I need it. No. Will I use it, hopefully. I love the pellet smoker at home and this will be great for rallys. So, I still get stuff I dont really need that takes up tons of space.
What brand and model? We have a bullet smoker that we keep in our trailer storage barn. We break it out two or three times a season at the campground. Mmmmm Good!
 

laird

Member
Jun 6, 2021
11
My ranger 10 fits in the garage and that makes all the difference. I'd love to have twin beds and a dinette but most of the times we use both beds we have picnic tables and cook outside.
I will second the point on tow vehicle storage. I just find that it's a lot easier to get into the tubs in the wagon for chairs, cookbox, etc. The Ranger 10 is pretty limited on storage and what there is can be hard to get to so I tend to keep 'extras' there.

But mainly, it fits in the garage so I can load out and go on a friday with very little effort.
 

JohnoWolf

New Member
May 22, 2003
3
When I camped with just a PUP I got a few gadgets that I thought were "essential" but it didn't take long to learn what was useful and what was "fluff". I kept the BAL leveler because it was handy, although honestly leveling blocks and/or boards are just as easy and more versatile. Most other "fluff stuff" got stored in the garage and is buried somewhere. Never had a problem camping for a couple of weeks or more out of the PUP. Then I got married and had kids .............
My (at the time "soon to be") wife's first experience camping with me in the PUP was on a VERY hot week in the St Louis area. She wasn't really thrilled that the PUP didn't get very cool even with the AC but was OK with it. Second experience: in a campground for 3 days in the pouring rain: 2 of us, 3 dogs, her sick (on her birthday, no less) in a 10 ft Jayco. Kind of threw her off from PUP camping. The main drawback, however; we Square Dance (I'm a caller and teacher) and we go to a lot of Square Dance conventions around the country. That requires a lot of outfits, storage of outfits and "extras" (slips, petticoats, shoes, boots, belts, ties, etc), not to mention the room to CHANGE into those outfits and "extras". Our first move from the PUP (our honeymoon gift to each other) was a Class C motorhome. Nice for the two of us, enough room and storage. Of course, that was before kids. At first with small kids the couch and dinette were fine (with us in the "over the cab" bed). As the kids, and we, got older the room shrank somehow and that overhead bed just got higher and higher up for some reason (and the clearance between mattress and roof seemed to get narrower every year). The biggest problem of course were those square dance conventions. We'd get to a campground, set up, then have to pull up stakes every day to drive to the convention center for dances, driving back to the cg usually around midnight so we could turn around and do it the next day. Not practical. All of a sudden, we had a motorhome we rarely used because it wasn't practical for its main purpose! Thus, the advent of the current TT.
Our criteria for the TT:
Hers: big enough for 2 adults and 2 kids, plus occasional sharing with in-laws (her parents and her brother). Enough storage for those outfits and extras. Room for changing (which required a slideout to be practical). Need semi-private space for adults. Practical refrigerator/freezer. Oven for baking brownies (an absolute must as far as she is concerned).
His: Small enough and light enough to tow practically with my RAM 1500 (5.7 Hemi V8) and able to negotiate curves, hills, etc with relative ease. Private space for "adult time". Room to stow all the sound equipment that I use for square dance calling and for performing (including "safe space" for guitars). Room for a second battery. Two propane tanks (or room for them). Enough water/grey/black tank space for some boondocking (at least a long weekend's worth).
Our solution: A 27ft 2019 Crossroads Sunset Trail 239bh. Bunks and "private space" for the kids. A front bedroom with SOLID DOORS THAT SLIDE CLOSED. Front storage that's full pass-through. Underbed storage under the bedroom queen bed. Two wardrobe "shirt" cabinets and an overhead in the bedroom. Underbed storage under the lower bunk. A Pantry closet with removeable shelves and a closet rod at the top so you can hang longer stuff (giving up part of the pantry/linen space). Dinette in a slide out with storage under the benches. Double sink kitchen with cooktop, oven and microwave. Outdoor kitchen (luxury!) with a cooktop and 120v small "dorm-style" refrigerator (which is only really practical when plugged in, obviously). A bumper-mountable grill (no more hauling the Coleman Roadtrip - good and bad; I like the Roadtrip better, but the bumper grill takes less space). 2 propane tanks on the tongue and room for a second battery box. It doesn't have as much storage space as she would want, but it's a good compromise. The TT has already gotten lots of use. We've towed it almost 2000 miles in just a few weeks (from GA to AL to Memphis TN right after buying it in GA, then home to IL; followed by a few shorter trips). It's definitely more "there" than a PUP behind my TV, but for its size tows nicely.
I found out I need even less "gadgets" than I did with the PUP. Everything moved from one to the other except the BAL leveler (single wheel leveler doesn't work with the two axle trailer). It's more work to set up/breakdown than the Class C, but less than the PUP.
We still have the PUP (stored in our back garage). I want to keep it for "true camping" but she's not totally convinced yet.
The long and short (OK, mostly long): It really is a matter of "what are you using it for". I still swear by the PUP for maximum usage with minimal space/size, that's the way to go for camping! But if you're using your rig for a "hotel on wheels" the TT seems much more practical, and definitely easier than hauling everything in and out of a hotel, not to mention having our own space.
 

GaWalker

Member
Nov 30, 2017
22
The Great State of Georgia
My wife and I are on the last legs of a 36 day trip from Georgia to Custer, Yellowstone, Grand Tetons, Rocky Mountain, etc. in a 2003 Aliner classic. We did not do laundry but did not dress fancy. Due to NP bear regulations, all cooking supplies were in trunk in bed of Ridgeline. Back seat of Ridgeline held cooler, coats, cameras etc. The camper is setup as two fulltime beds, fridge, furnace and AC. Resupplied when there was a Walmart near by. Everything worked great. We use packing cubes for clothes. I plan to hang packing cubes from a cross bar on future trips. We have done several one night stops and got basic setup/ breakdown to about 10 minutes. Towed easy, averaged 20.4 MPG (optimistic Ridgeline computer) and wife likes the bed better than at home. In my opinion, the Ridgeline was the perfect camper for this trip for our style of camping.
 

Chris I

Member
Sep 2, 2020
94
Portland, OR
Go to an airport check-in counter and you will see that some people are good at packing, and many people are not. People bring multiple suitcases on weekend trips.

I think Aliners require some thinking and focus on organization to work well. We are a family of 4 and we fit everything we need for a week long trip (off grid with no re-supply), including 3 inflatable paddeboards and 4 mountain bikes inside of our Scout. Only bring what you need, everything has a place, and those places are organized.

The one weak point on an a-frame is the set-up/break-down time if you are packing heavy. We did a 7 night trip where we moved 5 times, and we ended up just leaving the beds down and packing things on the floor after our 2nd move of the trip. It just takes too much time to pack stuff away and get it back out if you are moving every day.
 

Tom and Teresa

Active Member
Jun 18, 2019
136
Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
Do you mean aliner? Ours is a 2011, it doesn't have a lot of space to stow stuff, my husband hogs a lot of it, but I do have a nice soft sided container that has sections and stows under the bed. I like it a lot it's a great lightweight little camper. Really want to go all solar, hope to next spring.
I am actually talking about any of the A-frame campers…a-liner, Rockwood, Flagstaff, Chalet, etc. This couple had a Rockwood which is what we have and love. 🤷🏻‍♀️ Thank you for your comment. 😊
 

kudzu

Active Member
Gold Supporting Member
Oct 20, 2014
637
Knee deep in kudzu
We've done several multi week trips in the Aliner. We never had a lack of storage. In fact, we had so much stuff in there we would lose things under the beds and in the cargo space accessed from outside. My Aliner had the dinette up front and gaucho in rear. We just left both set up as full-time beds. That left tons of space under the beds. Plus, I had the outdoor cargo doors that gave access to a surprising amount of storage room. The space under the gaucho bed that was accessed from outside was huge. All the kitchen stuff, including the indoor/outdoor stove, plus a screen house, chairs and various other things all fit under the sofa, easily pulled out through the side cargo door. Again, it fit so much I would lose things in there. Truth is, it allowed us to bring along so many things we never ended up using. Mine also had the front cargo bin.

Inside, I installed brackets on the side walls, front and rear, from which I hung steel closet rods. It was primarily for sidewall stability in high wind situations but also served as hanging space. When we traveled with an extra person I would hang "privacy" curtains. As if one could have privacy in an Aliner. [LOL] Now counter space for charging our gadgets, that could be a real issue.

You know, it depends on the people involved. I can see why for some storage may be an issue. Then again, many of those are people who may have a similar issue with a small TT. For us, there was plenty of storage but a lack of efficient use of the space available. One might call that a storage issue but it certainly wasn't a lack of storage.

My wife and I are on the last legs of a 36 day trip from Georgia to Custer, Yellowstone, Grand Tetons, Rocky Mountain, etc. in a 2003 Aliner classic. We did not do laundry but did not dress fancy. Due to NP bear regulations, all cooking supplies were in trunk in bed of Ridgeline. Back seat of Ridgeline held cooler, coats, cameras etc. The camper is setup as two fulltime beds, fridge, furnace and AC. Resupplied when there was a Walmart near by. Everything worked great. We use packing cubes for clothes. I plan to hang packing cubes from a cross bar on future trips. We have done several one night stops and got basic setup/ breakdown to about 10 minutes. Towed easy, averaged 20.4 MPG (optimistic Ridgeline computer) and wife likes the bed better than at home. In my opinion, the Ridgeline was the perfect camper for this trip for our style of camping.

We did that same trip several years ago in my Aliner. That was a fantastic trip! Really, for me the Aliner was the perfect camper for that trip. The Aliner was a fantastic roadtrip trailer.
 

Karey

Active Member
Apr 3, 2021
102
Colorado
We have a Chalet Aframe and love it. It has bunk beds on one end which is where we sleep (there's just the 2 of us). The table end can remain as the table. I bought shoe shelves that line the far end behind the table and those shelves hold our clothes and other stuff. I have a permanent wire shelf on wall above the window on the sink/stove side. I mounted all sorts of "pop a ..." to the shelf - like pop-a-plate, pop-a-bowl .. napkins, paper towel, and kleenex. This shelf drops down in aisle when we close up the Aframe. Have a shelf unit that sits over the stove - which goes down on floor and bungeed in place for travel. The lower bunk can store all sorts of stuff when traveling, besides stuff in our truck. With solar we can camp for a long time.
 

Tom and Teresa

Active Member
Jun 18, 2019
136
Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
My wife and I are on the last legs of a 36 day trip from Georgia to Custer, Yellowstone, Grand Tetons, Rocky Mountain, etc. in a 2003 Aliner classic. We did not do laundry but did not dress fancy. Due to NP bear regulations, all cooking supplies were in trunk in bed of Ridgeline. Back seat of Ridgeline held cooler, coats, cameras etc. The camper is setup as two fulltime beds, fridge, furnace and AC. Resupplied when there was a Walmart near by. Everything worked great. We use packing cubes for clothes. I plan to hang packing cubes from a cross bar on future trips. We have done several one night stops and got basic setup/ breakdown to about 10 minutes. Towed easy, averaged 20.4 MPG (optimistic Ridgeline computer) and wife likes the bed better than at home. In my opinion, the Ridgeline was the perfect camper for this trip for our style of camping.
That’s awesome! We did that trip August of 2021! Loved it!!
 

dave123

freedom is not just another word
Mar 29, 2013
205
I saw a vlog by a couple that bought an A-frame camper a few years ago…they give updates every so often. I was blown away when they said they are glad they bought their camper, but it’s really only useful for a weekend or so at a time because of the storage issues. Blew my mind…my husband and I have taken extended trips (up to three weeks) in ours and have absolutely LOVED it! When we first bought it, I spent a lot of time thinking about how to increase storage and make optimal use out of the storage provided. What about the rest of you A-frame owners? Clear containers and command hooks/items became my go to. I measured and bought containers that fit perfectly in our under bed storage and under our dinette seat. Our A-frame provides so much outside storage too. Makes me sad that a camper that makes driving and getting to places so much more safely is being touted that it can only be used so sparingly.
we load the aframe to the gills arrive at the camp site unload the stuff in a popup tent then carry on
 

Minimalist

Active Member
Nov 30, 2015
258
Look at the life style of 80% of Americans and there comment is not a surprise. most people think bigger is better and owning more stuff is better.
 




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