Does size matter to you?

Discussion in 'Going to the DARK SIDE' started by inthedirt, Jun 19, 2020.

  1. Dingit

    Dingit Well-Known Member

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    Size matters! There are places out here that you can't take a trailer at all, and more where you can't park one if you got it there. There are other places (like the best parts of the Mojave) where the roads are terrible and a typical trailer won't make it. My XL popup trailer is a prissy weak-axled thing. Even so, it's gone through NFS campgrounds where I've seen other popups bottom out (which is pretty sad! We've only done an axle flip so we could get the thing up the driveway).

    We take a narrow, no-basement pop-up slide-in camper when we want to get further out. A 7-wide truck camper can go anywhere a (somewhat large) truck can. Some of the better manufacturers actually insulate them and include good-sized water tanks. Just plan on doing your entertaining outside. :p
     
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  2. rjhammetter

    rjhammetter Husband, Dad, Engineer & Camper

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    We are limited to our 7’ wide 19’ long TT by our TV. Inevitably, we end up spending part of our trip fantasizing about replacing our minivan with some 3500 diesel and a monster 32+ foot 5W or TT. I mean, it’s fun to dream - maybe a retirement gift to ourselves in 20some years when our kids and grandkids want to join us - but our current little TT does the trick for us.

    The point I was going to mention is that most campgrounds aren’t made for rigs like that. Sure there are KOAs and other RV parks with perfectly flat paved driveways, wide turns, trees trimmed back as high as 15 feet. Most small, wooded, private campgrounds aren’t like that. Many a time you see guys driving those rigs, plowing through tree branches, cutting corners over grass, or if the campground landscapes or puts boulders at the corners, having to back up and jackknife to make turns. They tip and sink in wet grass like genereok described or bottom out up or down sloped driveways. They always have the hardest time backing into any site that isn’t a pull through one. It’s not that these guys can’t drive, but those rigs have a way of making those guys look really silly sometimes. So yeah, size matters. The bigger, the harder it will be to maneuver. I think the optimal size of space and maneuverability for me has to be like 23-27 feet. Just an observation the more time I spend at campgrounds.
     
  3. inthedirt

    inthedirt Active Member

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    I can appreciate that observation, but I don't do campsites unless I'm doing a family reunion at a group site. Boondocking is the only way for me! That being said, the trip I took with my mom for her birthday last month was at a primitive site (lakeside) because that is all that is available at that lake. Otherwise, my dirt bike and ATV are for exploring the mountains while the camper stays in more open areas for the solar to do its job. The furnace gets used heavily in Montana pretty much all year. Hell, it just snowed 3 days ago....
     
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  4. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    One of our first, and major, size limitations is that we want to park any camper in our driveway. We have 21'4" as a max overall length. While we've sized ourselves out of a few campgrounds or sites we've used in the past, for the way we camp, we're pretty much OK. We have a list for our dream, unicorn trailer, which we may never find. Besides the length limit, we'd like dual axles, and after dealing with my sprained ankle on the last trip, I'd really like access to the toilet without the high threshold we currently have with our wet bath. Any trailer needs to be set up for dry camping. We don't do literal boondocking, but generally are dry camping. A couple of the Sister on the Fly events I've been to had campers parked in a large field.
     
  5. inthedirt

    inthedirt Active Member

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    Parking for me is not an issue. With 5 acres, 5 garages and a 40x60ft shop with 110/220 power.....I have plenty of space for my toys. I know that many people on this site prefer dedicated campgrounds, but I'm not one of them. In Montana, there is plenty of open country and dirt roads leading off into BLM land for free, public use. My wife jokes that it shouldn't be so expensive to be "homeless" and I refuse to pay $30-60 per night to camp. I'm setup with plenty of water, on-board water purification (0.02 micron filtration), solar, and enough Boy Scout skills to know how to use it all. Greatest part of boondocking is that I don't have to deal with neighbors and all their issues.
     
  6. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    I have an approx. 36ft single driveway along the side of my house plus another approx. 21ft double driveway in front of that. So I have enough parking for most anything. Getting a long trailer into the driveway is more difficult but could be done.

    But I really don't want or need anything larger than I have. I have a dedicated bed, dinette, couch that folds out for relaxing, kitchen, bathroom with sink, and a ton of storage in the clipper - I don't need anymore space than that. In the FnR, I have a dedicated bed for me, a dedicated bed for the dog that allows for some storage, a couch with table, kitchen and a wet bath. Storage isn't as much, but I can use the SUV for additional as needed.

    I just don't see the need to go bigger than I need for the sake of going bigger.
     
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  7. Sneezer

    Sneezer Well-Known Member

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    I would love to get something bigger myself. The pup is great for my son and I, but not good for family vacation. Only way that will happen is with a HTT or TT with at least one walk around bed. But they cost money which we are not presently equipped to pay with looming college expenses on the horizon. I am starting to get back into riding motorcycles, and it would be nice to have a toy hauler that I could load the bike into, head out somewhere, hit some scenic roads and come back home. Unfortunately, we are limited to about 27' overall length to store at the house, and that would also require a good trailer dolly to help maneuver it into place. We don't have the wide open spaces many have since we live in the city. Anything bigger then you have to add monthly storage fees, which rapidly gets to the point of "why are we even doing this?"

    I don't have a truck, and have no desire to get one, so 5th wheels are out. I could maybe get away with a front deck unit, but then I would need to use a trailer dolly to pull it up into position rather than pushing as I have a slight incline on my driveway. A front deck unit also may exceed my TW with a 500lb bike on it.

    In the end I am probably relegated to regular road trips with the family relying on hotel stays, keeping the pup for solo use, and picking up an enclosed cargo trailer to haul the bike and a cabin tent/gear for any bike trips. Maybe I might find one that has been converted to a camper as well.
     
  8. Steveo4090

    Steveo4090 Well-Known Member

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    The price of an EarthRoamer HD is $1,700,000 plus options.

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!
     
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  9. 4xMeteor

    4xMeteor Active Member

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    I tent camped in the boondocks for 40+ years, DW and I have moved to "traveling", our purpose changed. Having a larger TT means we have more creature comforts, and we enjoy having them. Having the larger TT will limit where we can go, but doesn't mean we're going to stop boondocking.

    2006-07_camping-001.jpeg 2006-08-sierratrek-017.jpeg
     
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