Door Gap on Pop Up

nitrohorse

Active Member
May 27, 2015
206
NE Pennsylvania
I have an issue that I'm sure is not unique to me or my 2004 Viking. Once the PUP is set up, and I lay down on the bed closest to the door, the gap widens on the door to the point that it has opened on it's own. What I believe is happening is that the door gap opens up as weight is placed on the bunk. I weight 250, which is not light, but I'm no where near the rated 1000lb capacity of the bunk. I can compensate for the gap by cranking the front stabilizers down and/or lifting the front "A" frame up with the front crank jack. It's apparent that the frame is flexing when weight is placed on the bunk. I'm curious if anyone has has had this issue and how you dealt with it.
Thanks in advance...
 
Jul 20, 2014
49
Yes, we had exactly that issue. The first DIY solution we did for years was to make a T-support that we crammed in between the two support bars and over the tongue. A bolt on the bottom that centered in a hole on the tongue frame kept it in place on the bottom, and a couple of thin pieces of plywood attached to the bottom of the bunk with short screws kept it from sliding out from under the bunk. We did that for several years but it was rather difficult to cram into position and I got tired of it.

Then I had an idea and took it to a welder and had him make a frame with diagonal bars that go from the tongue back against the front wall of the camper. That works really well, and he made it with threads so it could be adjusted if necessary (but I've never had to adjust it). I'll try to get a photo of that for you tomorrow, in case you'd like to take it to someone who could do something like that for you. Unless of course the wooden T-support is your preference! (The metal frame works better because it adds force in the opposite direction, which the wooden support did not do.)
 
Jul 20, 2014
49
Here are the photos of the bracing system. He put bushings between the frame and the camper wall.

Looks like I need to paint! They're rustier than I realized!
 

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nitrohorse

Active Member
May 27, 2015
206
NE Pennsylvania
Excellent solution. I think I'm going to fab something like you have. I can close some of the gap with the stabilizers, but your approach is much more effective. I have a welder, so it's time to make a brace. Thanks again, I appreciate it.
 

bupkis

Howdy!
Mar 3, 2006
7,938
N. TX
Weight on the bunk causes pull on the box and the door cut in the side of the P-U makes that side weak.

coachmen/viking got rid of the supports under the bunks and used cables to support from above, this causes the the beds to want to push in when weight is added to the bunks and issues with the stops they use.
 

nitrohorse

Active Member
May 27, 2015
206
NE Pennsylvania
Weight on the bunk causes pull on the box and the door cut in the side of the P-U makes that side weak.

coachmen/viking got rid of the supports under the bunks and used cables to support from above, this causes the the beds to want to push in when weight is added to the bunks and issues with the stops they use.
I agree. I have some aluminum angle and some straight aluminum bars that I can use. The only issue I have it that I can only use my map gas torch and aluminum brazing rods to attach everything. I never had much like with using those rods, so I might just buy some steel and weld everything. Thanks for the comment...
 

Jkoht

Active Member
Aug 10, 2020
165
The best way to avoid this is to have four stabilizers under the body of the camper on solid steel crossmembers, and your tonuge jacked down enough to support but not lift. If you're on soft ground or experience rain your stabilizers might sink a bit so you might need to snug them up more.
 
Jul 20, 2014
49
The best way to avoid this is to have four stabilizers under the body of the camper on solid steel crossmembers, and your tonuge jacked down enough to support but not lift. If you're on soft ground or experience rain your stabilizers might sink a bit so you might need to snug them up more.
We actually had stabilizers under the four corners and did keep them snug, but the way that the bars attach to the front still made the camper wall pull out when weight was placed on the bunk. The bracing system I've shown alleviates that.
 

nitrohorse

Active Member
May 27, 2015
206
NE Pennsylvania
The best way to avoid this is to have four stabilizers under the body of the camper on solid steel crossmembers, and your tonuge jacked down enough to support but not lift. If you're on soft ground or experience rain your stabilizers might sink a bit so you might need to snug them up more.
I have 4 stabs, one at each corner of the pup's frame. I have tweaked the stabs to take up any slop and also used the tongue jack to do the same. The problem is in the short section of wall at the front of the pup. The weight of the bunk and I causes the small wall section to flex, resulting in the door gap opening up and sometimes unlatching the door itself. The short section of wall from the front wall to the door opening is not rigid enough. A few yellow pine 2x2s and a few staples just isn't holding the weight.
While keeping the stabs and tongue jacks snug does help some, it doesn't stop the wall from flexing.
I believe there are two ways to correct this issue. One is to build a brace as MichelleRowell provided or remove the interior paneling and reinforce/brace the wall with metal angle iron. I will take the easier route and build an external brace.

 




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