Drill to crank up Poppy - best for torque?

Discussion in 'Lift Systems' started by NegrilJerry, Nov 21, 2021.

  1. NegrilJerry

    NegrilJerry Newbies in GA, we LOVE this site!

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    After the first camp season of hand cranking up our Fleetwood Sun Valley I bought a T-slot adapter and a drill kit off eBay - a Rigid brand with two batts. Worked great but now the batteries are pooping out and I'm ready to replace the drill, since batteries cost as much as a dang drill.

    Note: I'm super careful when cranking, ALWAYS start and finish by hand to avoid over cranking and causing most grievous damage. When I start I wait for that sound and feel that tells me the capstan has engaged before switching to drill.

    Seems to me the stat I only care about is torque, does that sound correct? The Rigid is a two speed and I of course only use the slow speed / higher torque setting. Pretty sure it's an older brush-motor model, and that I should spend the extra for a name brand brushless - but any tips are appreciated. Right now a Dewalt model (DCF885C1) seems to be the clear winner for torque, available now for $99 but with only one battery. Seems like one should get the job done though.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2021
  2. gladecreekwy

    gladecreekwy Well-Known Member

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    881EF67F-53D8-4F1B-A635-32C5DAE9C7FF.jpeg Ah, another chance to post a pic of my power cranker
     
  3. friartuck

    friartuck Well-Known Member

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    Yes torque is important, 400+ inch/lbs and getting a drill with metal gears is also very important, because torque. I used a Milwaukee M18 drill on the Bayside for the roof (w/AC) and the stabs. Always worked well. Do not use an impact driver as that can destroy the lift system (bang bang instead of whirr whirr)

    PS I got new batteries for my older Ryobi 12vdc driver at a Battery and Bulb store. They knew what I wanted, had them in stock, and it was so cheap I bought two. So that might be an option for you to source new batteries for your Ryobis
     
  4. J Starsky

    J Starsky Well-Known Member

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    DeWalt runs my stabilizers really well. I was using the Hobo Freight cheapo drill and it worked too. Just don't overrun the jacks or you will bend the steel pin that holds back the washer on the jack. Hope things are looking up for you!
     
  5. NegrilJerry

    NegrilJerry Newbies in GA, we LOVE this site!

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    One thing that I have to watch out for is having too much torque when doing the stabilizers, because if you inadvertently hit the wrong direction button with your thumb you can have a severely sprained wrist.

    I just checked - torque can be a hard stat to find! - and my old & big & heavy Rigid has a max 500 in-lb, sufficient but not that impressive compared to some models that crank out 1200+ in-lbs. I have marked my side bars on the pup to I know where to stop a few hand cranks shy of completion, so I never risk over cranking.

    Thanks for the tip to avoid a drill categorized as an impact driver!
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2021
  6. squirrelbox

    squirrelbox Active Member

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    Not an expert. Torgue is a very important component when talking about energy to do stuff. Two years ago when researching drills to operate ice augers for drilling holes through the ice to eventually get enough meat for the winter I settled on the Milwaukee hammer drill. Most torque in the industry at that time. Game changer for us fish people. I bought model 2704. Do not use on hammer mode, use it on low speed drill mode. Has a handle so you do not break your wrist. Very pricey for me but came with long amp hour batteries. Important when drilling a hundred holes. I could rationalize what I spent - $265 because I can use it for work also. Pick a price point and get the most torque. Research the product and torque. I think (not expert) ridged is your best buy at lower price point
     
  7. Everett Bartlett

    Everett Bartlett Active Member

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    I have both the Ryobi 19v, and the Dewalt 20v in 1/2" size. They work fine for the jacks, and the BAL leveler, but do not have the guts to lift the top. I have to raise the top manually, they will work to lower the top. I was talking to one of the Home Depot reps, and he thought that I MIGHT be able to use one of the Milwaukee Industrial drills, but no guarantees.
     
  8. Grandpa Don

    Grandpa Don Well-Known Member

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    I use the Dewalt 20volt max. I set it on low speed and have no trouble raising the top of my Viking twice on one battery. Mine did come with two batteries and a wall charger. I think it was on sale for around $100.00 a year ago. I posted a photo of my set up somewhere else on this forum. But I can't remember where.
     
  9. Sneezer

    Sneezer Well-Known Member

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    Did you register the Ridgid drill for the lifetime warranty? Their LSA is pretty good off you registered when. You got it.

    I use a corded harbor freight 1/2" drill. I can set the trigger speed to low, and it has an extra handle to grab onto. I always camp with electric anyway so this was the cheapest option. I think I paid $50 for it several years ago.
     

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