Easiest Pop Up to set up?

Discussion in 'Camper Pre-Purchase Questions' started by Pugwinkle, Aug 24, 2021.

  1. Pugwinkle

    Pugwinkle New Member

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    Do you find the Clipper easy to put up by yourself?
     
  2. Dingit

    Dingit Well-Known Member

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    My popup has poles. They aren't the hard part. Not a bit. But even so, I want that Clipper/Viking system! :p
     
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  3. Pugwinkle

    Pugwinkle New Member

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    What do you find to be the hard part of putting up the pop up trailer? What kind do you have?
     
  4. Dave Fro

    Dave Fro New Member

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    Another thing that could be hard, and a job that I have seen others detest, is the cranking up/down the trailer, and also the cranking up/down the stabilizer jacks. On my trailer I can use a cordless hand drill (and the included socket) to do both the jobs. I would imagine doing it manually with the included hand crank would be a pain, especially if it were hot, or I was worn out. On that note, cranking the tongue up/down, while not hard, does involve exerting some energy, I'm guessing an automatic one would be nice, but a bit frivolous depending on the size/weight of the trailer.

    Another task that I pawn off on my kids is doing the "under the bed ends" stuff, like attaching the vinyl sides to the underside of the bed, doing up the safety strap, etc. You can mostly do it standing, but if you need to see, or line things up, you have to get underneath the bed, which is a bit of a pain.

    Pulling the beds out, and pushing them back in, can also be a bit annoying. I have found I really have to life the front bed up to slide it out, before I figured that out it took a fair bit of effort to get it slid out. Putting them back in is a little precarious, because you really want to take the time to make sure you aren't pinching the vinyl between any moving parts, and I guess same goes for pulling it out as well. If you feel any resistance you really need to stop and look around to make sure nothing is caught and will tear if you pull any harder.

    That being said, I can raise my pup by myself in about 15 minutes, and put it down in maybe 20. Could probably shave 5 minutes off if I were in a rush, but I like taking my time to make sure everything is lined up nicely, folded nicely, etc. If I am really taking my time I can stretch it out to more than a half hour, but it when I am in super lazy mode.
     
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  5. Dingit

    Dingit Well-Known Member

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    I have a slightly lifted highwall and pulling out the beds can be hard--they are almost at shoulder height when it's level so the physics aren't great. Flat spots are rare where we camp so usually one end is really high. I'd avoid a highwall if you're short and camping alone.

    I had an old Apache popup (hardside, popup shape) that was incredibly easy to set up, from cranking to pulling out beds to putting the puzzle pieces together. It didn't even have latches to undo. That was one low low popup!
     
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  6. Karey

    Karey Member

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    Sure love the ease of our 30 second A-frame. At 63 I can put up the sides easily. We rented traditional pop ups and once had more than 70 mile per hour winds at Colorado's Sand Dunes (why the dunes are there!) and thought it was going to fall down for sure!
     
  7. Paul Zimmer

    Paul Zimmer Member Silver Supporting Member

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    What "shoulder trick"?

    I have Coleman. The hardest parts for me are pulling out the swing-down stabilizers (I suspect crank stabilizers are much easier) and putting that wretched top bed pole in place. You can avoid the crank-up work by using a drill-driver (adapter available at colemanpopupparts.com).

    Paul Zimmer
     
  8. Fish N Farm

    Fish N Farm Well-Known Member

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    I have a 2017 Flagstaff 228BHSE which is a pop up with an electric winch that lifts the roof and a 2021 Jayco 184 BS which is a small travel trailer. If I had I known what was instore for my life when we bought the pop up. I would have bought a large A frame with a bathroom instead. My wife was adamite about not paying storage to keep a camper indoors. I am adamite about any camper being stored under cover so we bought the pop up because it would fit in our garage after removing the spare tire and bracket. We bought the pop up because the tear drop we had to pull behind our Jeep Rubicon had nothing but sleeping inside. We being older needed a bathroom. So we bought the pop up with a bath and shower inside. So now I have a pop up in the garage and a travel trailer in a rental stall. The big Flagstaff A frame with the electric roof lift would have been the best bet. With a folding tongue it would have fit in our garage. Hook up and tow it 80 on I-10 headed west and quick and easy to set up. May be 10 minutes more time than setting up a regular TT.
     
  9. Patrick w

    Patrick w Active Member

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    My newly aquired LL isn't bad. But it isn't as fast as an a liner. It is half the weight though. If I had an Aliner, I'd actually consider sleeping in a walmart parking lot. But not with what I have. There is also pretty much 0 ameneties, which isn't usually an issue for me (no water/toilet/shower/tub/dishwasher etc). It is a box on wheels.
     

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