Easy and peasy as pie!

Discussion in 'Boondocking' started by Arlyn Aronson, May 17, 2019.

  1. BackyardCalifornia

    BackyardCalifornia Member

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    Where do you like to go in the Sierras? Up Hwy 4 or 108? I love getting out the central valley heat and heading up to either Bass or Shaver Lake.
     
  2. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    My favorite is wild plum off 49. Spanish Creek up by Quincy is nice. Running Deer at Little Grass Valley reservoir is nice. French Meadows near Foresthill is nice but the road is a lot of up and down and you can only go about 20mph.
     
  3. Arlyn Aronson

    Arlyn Aronson Well-Known Member

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    Thanks to all who's posted. If anyone would like to try camping off the grid or away from standard campgrounds, this is the place to ask about it. Or is this thread in the wrong location? Maybe it should be among the general threads.
     
    EmilyW and Toedtoes like this.
  4. BBQdave

    BBQdave Active Member

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    The Cub Scout camps have water spigot and vault toilet, and it's nice to see all having fun with limited resources :)

    This may be the same for other states, but NC has some nice small privately owned campgrounds with bathhouse and peace and quiet. The cost is the same as camping at State parks, for tent and PUPs. There's more amenities like pool, laundry and game area. But it's in a quiet peaceful area, with small number of campsites. I like this camping with kids :)
     
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  5. Arlyn Aronson

    Arlyn Aronson Well-Known Member

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    Again, thanks to everyone who's posted. If anyone would like to try camping off the grid or away from standard campgrounds, this is the place to ask about it. Its so easy!
     
  6. silvermickey2002

    silvermickey2002 Morris County, NJ

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    I've hiked the AT thru the Harriman/Bear Mountain parks twice. I have gone up Bear Mountain and Down it! Not easy either way with a pack on your back. Hiking up the AT (Bear Mt side) after crossing the bridge is an experience! Even crossed the Bear Mountain bridge and visited the Zoo there twice. And that's sticking to the trail! Backpacking is the closet I have come to boondocking. Like someone said above, "I'm done squatting over a hole!", flush toilets are a luxury that I want! Since 2012 I have backpacked about 500 miles. I can say "Been there, done that"! So, I enjoy having full hook ups. I really enjoy having a bed off the ground!
     
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  7. 8lugnutz

    8lugnutz Member

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    We have spent a few days here and there totally off grid. It’s the favorite of most of the family...except my wife. She's Gotta have her shower house when she goes!

    We have a shower tent and all that if we are staying for more than two days, cassette toilet that we dump when we can, where we can, and where we are supposed to.

    Power: have a generator. Rarely use it. Have solar. Love it. Use propane to keep the fridge going if we have to, but most of the time it’s off too and stuff is in our Cabela’s cooler.

    Per my conversation with the Forest Service in Colorado Springs, pop-ups can utilize the USFS dispersed camping areas because they are not considered an RV/Travel Trailer, that opened up more possibilities than we ever thought imaginable! I got that in writing via email thinking someone might challenge it, but have never needed it. We love being where others aren’t most of the time. The kids favorite spot is anywhere in the National Forest, but especially anywhere near St. Elmo, CO.
     
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  8. Arlyn Aronson

    Arlyn Aronson Well-Known Member

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    We have a generator but never take it. No solar panel or anything else for power. LED lights have came very for low power consumption in the past 20 years. Bring a big heavily insulated cooler which will last for days and days. Can and do shower if we like. No reason to not be comfortable.

    Camping off grid is easy!
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2019
  9. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    I don't have a generator or solar either. The clipper's battery is big enough to handle what I need it for. I actually run out of water first. I can go 10 days without any real conservation of water (no showers, but I drink the water out of my tank) and my battery is still in the green.

    With the FnR, I have a bit less than half the water capacity. So far I have only gone for four days max. But I will be doing a weeklong trip soon and will see how everything works. I have some water containers since there is no water at the campground.

    I do have multiple small jump starters. One in the FnR to charge cell phones, etc., one in the Durango for emergency jumpstarting, two in the clipper (one for each purpose), and a couple cheap little ones for additional charging.

    I'm not a big power hog when camping and don't camp where I need AC. If I need heat, I use the Mr Heater. So, electrical is the least of my concerns.
     
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  10. Arlyn Aronson

    Arlyn Aronson Well-Known Member

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    If anyone would like to try camping off grind, this is the place to ask any questions. But it is easy and anyone can do it.
     
  11. dbhost

    dbhost Well-Known Member

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    No PU yet, but I can off grid, depending on season, for 5 days without having to get to "civilization" and that is driven by work requirements, and I am tent camping out of a Chevy Malibu lately.

    Water supply 4 @ 7 gallon aquatainers.
    Showers average 2 gallons per person, every 2 days, so 8 gallons, and 1 gallon drinking / cooking daily, leaving plenty leftover for cleanup and just extra water.
    Toilet has been 1 bag every 2 days in the luggable loo. Not sure how long the flushing port o potty will last.
    I have a Coleman Extreme 50qt cooler that we pack with ice blocks in Fiji Water bottles. The lid of the cooler is foamed and it will hold ice and keep food cold if kept out of the sun for 5 days, but the end of day 5, I need to renew the ice.
    The HF Tailgator generator gets run once a day to charge up my jump pack to power my CPAP. I go through a gallon of fuel every 3 days or so.
    Coleman fuel for the stove, and lanterns a full tank in the appliances typically lasts 3 days, heaters are another story... My 511A with my use of the thing, the fill lasts all 5 days but drinks about a gallon doing so... Cheaper than a Buddy heater to run for sure, I typically run it from "Getting crisp in the evening," and put it outside the tent and snuff it at bed time. I have used it overnight a few times but ONLY with plenty of air flow for fresh oxygen supply... Even then it still lasted. I have never really tested how long it can go continuous. I have a recently acquired 518B 3K BTU heater that I want to fill and run time test this winter...
     
  12. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    For me, the most difficult part is finding a boondock location.

    My preferred camping style lends to the following:

    Water source within walking distance (lake, creek, etc)
    Photo op scenery within walking distance (waterfall, rapids, overlook, wildlife)
    Lack of neighbors
    Shade

    Many of the boondock sites I've checked out lack two or all of these. One I checked out recently was shady and secluded, but there was no water for several miles and no wildlife or scenic view. It'd be fine for a "just get away and stay in camp reading" trip.

    Another was a basic parking lot near a lake. No shade, about 15 rigs all parked close together, and nothing scenic. Looked like a popular spot for off-roaders. I can have more solitude in a USFS campground plus photo ops than I could there.

    I'm still looking for some nice spots to boondock, but I won't give up on campgrounds that offer all my desires.
     
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  13. Arlyn Aronson

    Arlyn Aronson Well-Known Member

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    If anyone would like to try camping away from camperland and with no services, do ask any questions you might have here. Camping that way is just so, so easy to do! [:D] You can do it too.
     
  14. NMroamer

    NMroamer Well-Known Member

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    In the last nineteen years of camping we have camped with hookups one time. One concession we do make is to take a generator to keep the battery charged when we need to use the heater in the camper. We are both over seventy and get cold easier now. I am amused at the home away from home items some people feel they need to go camping.
     
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  15. Arlyn Aronson

    Arlyn Aronson Well-Known Member

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    We don't have any appliances to "plug in" in our camper. Water, power or anything else. Don't bring a generator or AC. Still have a grand time. Its easy to do..
     
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  16. EmilyW

    EmilyW Member

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    My biggest question is how do you find these sites? Are you asking farmers and staying on private property?
     
  17. EmilyW

    EmilyW Member

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    Same! Not sure they are as readily available in my area/East TN. Thinking finding private property and getting permission to stay is a good way? Sometimes just a change of scenery is good for the soul.
     
  18. Arruba

    Arruba Active Member

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    Yup, the idea can be tough to pull off back east. The Cherokee National Forest would be the first place I’d guess to look. Second would be any State owned lands. Used to be in my state, the timber companies were by and large open for camping, less so today. I know TVA has lands they manage, what they allow, I don’t know. With all that typed, your private property idea may be a good approach.

    Good luck.
     
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  19. EmilyW

    EmilyW Member

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    That's a good point about TVA. My redneck (unnamed...lol) brothers camp all around here, but I imagine party hard and don't leave a good trace. I know its possible, but with us having kids and just wanting to be respectful, want to do it right. Saw a bit more about Cherokee on the forestry service site, so might start there! Glad that came to your mind as well.
     
  20. Arruba

    Arruba Active Member

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    I guess to better answer the general question for those wondering “how to find it”, the answer is #1, consider an area highly likely to have open area camping. For some of us the obvious choice, though not the only one, is the public domain (USFS, BLM etc.) or your state land mgt agency.
    #2, check with whoever manages it for any rule or regulation.
    #3, plan an expeditionary camp trip or two to explore what an area offers and if it’s any interest to you. Someone here previously mentioned snagging a campground spot to launch a search for boondock opportunity. I’ve certainly done that myself.

    As for other sources of info, google aside, now and then the van lifers, RV nomads, and travel or overland bloggers have info on where to stay, on their sites.

    I wish you all well in finding your space to escape or whatever compels you to camp. [CP]
     

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