Emergency Disaster Pack

Discussion in 'General Camping Discussion Forum' started by Steph, Dec 8, 2011.

  1. Steph

    Steph Member

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    I saw that someone posted on another thread some of what they put in their emergency disaster pack for earthquakes. Just curious, what do you have in your pack so that you are prepared for a natural disaster?

    Throw Blankets
    Granola Bars
    Cash
    Credit Card
    Copy Birth Certificate
    Flashlight
    Batteries

    Can you add to the list?
     
  2. marcham

    marcham New Member

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    Any personal emergency preparedness course that you take (lookup your local Emergency Management Office) will recommend a 3 day supply of food and water packed in a go-kit for your family. Don't forget meds if you need them and toys for the kids. Copy of house insurance and ID should also be stashed in the kit.

    http://www.getprepared.gc.ca/index-eng.aspx

    Sometimes it ends up cheaper to just buy a pre-assembled kit

    http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11100551&search=emergency&Mo=77&cm_re=1_en-_-Top_Left_Nav-_-Top_search&lang=en-US&Nr=P_CatalogName:BC&Sp=S&N=5000043&whse=BC&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntk=Text_Search&Dr=P_CatalogName:BC&Ne=4000000&D=emergency&Ntt=emergency&No=43&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&Nty=1&topnav=&s=1
     
  3. PattieAM

    PattieAM New Member

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    Don't forget the needs of the family pets - copy of rabies cert., critter food/meds, x-tra leash/tie out, litter or poop collection bags.
     
  4. BirdLand

    BirdLand New Member

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    IMHO, mental health is important too - does each family member have a portable 'mental health' item (i.e. instrument, scrapbook, blankie, etc.). If instruments/scrapbooks are impractical (as in the case of pianos) what's a small & portable item that family members could include for comfort (little ones might have a small piece cut out of their blankie), older folks might have a cherished photo or letter from their larger scrapbook. I've never had to flee for my life, though I've come close (flash flooding). My neighbors who spent time in such shelters often wish they'd thought to put a small, lightweight sentimental item in their 'getaway bag'. I've often thought about what living in an emergency shelter might be like, and I think that maybe a small comfort item would be mentally helpful.
     
  5. fmbhappycamper

    fmbhappycamper PuP Power

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    Here in Florida we always have a Hurricane Prepared box with radio, flashlight, batteries, canned food and can opener, luckily a lot of cans are pop top now. Pet food and meds, 1st aid kit. And water, at least 1 gal per person. We also have important papers in the freezer, less likely to blow away and a spare flashlight on the top of the refrigerator because you can always walk to the refrig in the dark! [8D]
     
  6. Sushidog

    Sushidog Active Member

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    A lot depends on the emergency you are preparing for and how severe it turns out to be. I purchased my Aliner as a bug out vehicle after hurricane Katrina and have used it for hurricane evacuation since.

    I second cash. After Katrina, when all the branches of my bank were destroyed or under water, I could not access any funds. The cash you had on-hand was all you had access to. A water filter is good insurance when there is plenty of water but it's not potable. Extra fuel (which I carry on my back bumper) might be indespensible when all the gas stations are closed or without power and can't pump any out of the ground, like after Katrina. It also provides fuel for my little generator for battery charging and air conditioner use.

    Keeping your propane tank (s) full and/or having extra propane bottles for heat and cooking is not a bad idea either.

    If preparing for a sociatal collapse, as what usually follows after a major disaster, a firearm and ammunition might just save the life of a loved one. My nephew was flying an air ambulance after Katrina and was jubjected to gunfire from the very people he was trying to save. I know it makes no sense at all, but it happened. A .22 rifle or shotgun (with sufficient ammo) might also provide another source of food procurement should the disaster become prolonged. A simple fishing kit (like a pocket fisherman or collapsing rod/reel) is another overlooked source of food procurement.

    A good medical kit is indespensible too. Taylor it to your specific needs and skill set. Dont forget mundane but essential items like insect repellant, sunscreen, chapstick and toilet paper and plastic bags for waste disposal. A folding shovel (entrenching tool), survival knife, hatchet and machette are also very useful. You'll find simple rope, duct tape, and roll of aluminum foil worth it's weight in gold at times.

    If you are a hard core prepper, consider gas masks (with eyeglass inserts like I have) so I can drive and shoot with it on. A chemical spill decon kit, potasium iodide (for radiation protection) might give some peace of mind if you live around lots of chemical plants, nuclear reactors, oil refineries, chemical storage yards, trains and tanker trucks full of toxic chemicals, etc. like I do. I have topo maps of the area along with my road atlas for navigation and a compass.

    Many more things could be added based on your threat assessment and risk tollerance, but these things are a good start in getting you to reflect on assembling your "life insurance gear" as I like to call it. Remember the best life insurance policy can only pay your family after you are dead. Good bug-out gear, planning and training can prevent cashing in on said policy. ;)

    Chip
     
  7. Mosbyranger

    Mosbyranger Onward, thru the fog...

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    I try to keep the pup stocked and ready for emergencies. 2 mag lights, battery charged, full propane tanks, Katydyn water filter, large first aid kit, knives, ax, sharpener, green propane bottles and a .22 pistol and rifle are permanently located with the pup. I also have 6 extra 20lb propane bottles stored at the house, 6 5 gallon gas cans, 6 5 gallon water containers, meds ready to pack and go, and the sleeping bags are ready. All we have to do is get the food and clothing loaded and we are out the door to a pre designated area to meet with a couple of other like minded people. It may sound extreme, but I have found that while people do not plan on being victims, neither do they plan on survival. If it's bug out time, it will take us about 2 hours to be outta here with enough resources to get by for a couple of weeks. I sure hope it never comes to this extreme.
    MR
     
  8. hakrjak

    hakrjak Member

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    I'd be worried to leave a gun in my PUP for fear of rust if it got musty in there during winter. Maybe you guys that do that keep yours in the garage? Same thing with ammo -- I'd be worried if it got crazy hot in the summer time over 100 outside, it could go off or ruin it?

    Cheers,

    -Hakrjak
     
  9. Agfadoc

    Agfadoc Member

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    Re: Re: Emergency Disaster Pack

    Good info, and I am of the same mindset, it's just another insurance policy. Homeowners, car, life, unemployment and disaster. With all the crazy crud going on today, Iran, middle east, etc. It's always a good idea to have a disaster plan.

    Our first and foremost is agreeing on a place where we will all meet. Nothing worse than not knowing where everyone is in a disaster when communications go down.

    I hate that we live in the times to require such things, and not being such a religious guy, a quote from my mom on a regular basis comes to mind:
    "A prudent person foresees danger and takes precautions. The simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." Proverbs 27:12

    I want to be prudent...

    Sent from my Supercharged Asus Transformer
     
  10. CalKat

    CalKat Member

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    We have the home emergency kit and we each carry a Go-Bag, a knapsack with emergency gear. I would like to comment that after doing some research that lifeboat rations have a long life and can withstand wide temperature variations. For a bag in your car, there isn't much out there with a shelf life longer than a year except for the lifeboat rations.

    Work gloves are also useful to keep ready.
     
  11. USKustoms

    USKustoms pimp my trailer

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    Our pup is actually part of our "good" plan. ( get out of dodge). We look at it this way...every camping trip is practice for the time when you might actually have to 'bugout' if that disaster does happen. .
    There are hundreds of sources for good info, here is one.
    http://beasurvivor.blogspot.com/
     
  12. DSCinVegas

    DSCinVegas New Member

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    Reminds me--- There is a new store here in Vegas.... "Zombie Apocalypse Supply Co".
    Seriously, I'm not kidding. [LOL]
     
  13. Wrenchgear

    Wrenchgear Near Elmira, Southern Ontario

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    Also depends on the time of year and where you are. We have -6 C (about 20F) here today and it will be getting much colder over the next couple of months. You better have some warm gloves, boots, and heavy coats ready to go. Maybe also some fire starting skills and supplies, but we are all campers here so I know this would come second nature to us all. [;)]
     
  14. Sushidog

    Sushidog Active Member

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    I live in Louisiana where there is very high humidity. The guns I keep in my camper and car are both stainless, so I never see a speck of rust. I've kept ammo in hot and humid temps for years and never had a misfire. I would not worry about the heat in a camper. The chamber of a semi-automatic firearm gets very hot when fired rapidly - much hotter than sitting in the sun in peak summer and I've never heard of a round cooking off in one. I've only heard or rounds cooking off in closed bolt full-auto weapons at bolt temps over 400 degrees. If it gets that hot inside your camper you've got a bigger problem than ammo cooking off.

    It's a good idea to rotate your ammo once a year anyway. Besides, it's a good excuse for a little range time to maintain your proficiency.

    Chip
     
  15. Hanne

    Hanne New Member

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    Basic bags for each of us, which would get additional items rotated in or out depending on destination or time of year. They would go in the T.V. or the pup. We like getting into more remote areas so we tend to use the "10 essentials" and customize from there. (This all fits in my lumbar pack)

    TOOLS
    Multi-tool
    good knife
    wire cutters
    wire saw
    compass (know how to use it!) & topo maps
    First aid kit
    needle/thread/safety pins/split rings/carabiners
    paracord/duct tape /wire
    hand-crank/solar radio flashlight
    walking stick
    5-in-1 emergency whistle
    paper/pencil

    FIRE, LIGHT & FUEL
    LED flashlight
    3 types firestarter(matches,lighter,fire steel) & tinders(PJCB, small lip balm tin, beeswax birthday candle)
    fuel cubes
    hobo stove

    WATER & FOOD
    2 types water purification(tabs, straw filter) & water containers(SS water bottle & oven cooking bag)
    meal replacement bar, & trail mix (gets rotated regularly)
    hobo utensils

    SHELTER & CLOTHING
    tarp
    rain poncho
    emergency bivy
    contractor bags
    2 bandanas
    extra socks
     

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