Floor rot around the edges

Discussion in 'Roof/Floor Repair & Maintenance' started by banks412, Aug 13, 2014.

  1. banks412

    banks412 New Member

    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2013
    Hi all,

    It's been a while since my last few posts in the A/C repair section, but I recently have shifted my thoughts to the floor and grow more and more concerned with it and am trying to decide what to do. BTW - the a/c is working GREAT!!

    For a while now, I've been aware of some floor rot around the edges of my PuP's floor, specifically in the corner areas and along the outer perimeter. I know it's there (or not there, however you want to look at it) but I've chosen to ignore it until now. The last few days I've tried to just scan the forum and see what other folks are doing, and it seems that I've only got two options; 1. Replace the entire floor by gutting the pup and scrapping it down to the floor or 2. Leaving it alone/getting rid of the PuP and finding something else.

    I understand that the proper way to fix this issue is a total floor replacement. I'm just not sure that I'm up for that task, and being that my PuP is a 1995 model with quite a few years on her, I won't lie. I'm tempted to sell her this fall as deer season comes on and just save for a few years until I can afford something else. However, I don't want to let her go! I've put quite a bit of time and love into the old girl and I'd be lying if I said I wasn't at least half interested in trying to figure out what I can do for it. Heck, does anyone have any full on redneck suggestions even? I'll try and get some pics of what I'm talking about but I suspect you all know what I'm referring to - at least those of you out there who've owned 20 year old PuP's will know. [V]

    Hope this finds everyone safe and happy and enjoying their PuP's! I know I am - just got back from a 3 night stay at Inks Lake, TX with my son. Boy it was hot. Planning to invest in some PUG's and reflectix for the windows in the bunks! [;)]
     
  2. cullinan18

    cullinan18 New Member

    Messages:
    430
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2012
    I have a significant amount of rot in my 1993 that I'm going to tackle this weekend with a buddy. Our plan it to just pull back the vinyl floor, remove the rotted out section, replace with new plywood, and put the vinyl back. Is that the best way? I don't know. Will that be sufficient to fix the immediate problem? We think so. The first issue, of course, is to identify and fix where the water is coming from. In my situation, I need to recoat the roof and redo all the caulking around the openings.

    Good luck on your project. If you love your pup, fix her enough to keep you happy and her working for you.
     
  3. banks412

    banks412 New Member

    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2013
    You know, I hate to say it, but I really do love the old PuP. It's become a labor of love since I've had it, but I feel like all I've done is put lipstick on a pig. Albeit, MY pig, but still. I can't help but feel that there are a few things that could use some attention but are quite possibly out of my league when it comes to routine maintenance. I know most of the issues are from neglect on the PO's end. Most of those I've resolved (repainted the entire PuP, replaced the A/C seal and wood mount ring in the roof and sealed the roof seam with eternabond), plus the PuP now lives in a garage instead of outside, so it's essentially STOPPED aging, but the underlying problems are still there. There's even some frame rust holes that need to be patched with steel bar stock, but I think I can tackle that.

    Can I ask, how are you replacing only sections of the floor? Are you pulling the linoleum back enough just to cut a piece to fit on the frame below? I know with mine, and I'm sure yours too, it would require pulling out seating on both sides, and again, I'm not sure I have the strength or the know how to take it that far. I could probably be talked into it, but I have no one to help me and the rot is pretty much around the entire outer perimeter.

    I just don't know how far I want to take this. At what point do you sort of cut your losses and try to upgrade?

    Thanks in advance guys.... [?:~{]
    [PU] [PUT]
     
  4. cullinan18

    cullinan18 New Member

    Messages:
    430
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2012
    The 1993 is a old, well worn TT. One section of dinette seating might need to be removed, but the vinyl will be pulled up there and into the bedroom. I am only looking to repair the worthless / dangerous sections of flooring, so yes, I'm only looking to peel back enough and cut a piece of ply or OSB on top of the floor joists. Since the camper is permanently parked in PA (about 70 miles from me), I only have limited opportunities to get out there for repairs. If I can just band-aid the known problems to make it usable for my family, that's what I'll be doing. Proper repairs can slow be done over time.

    Anyway, I am hopeful my plan will be possible and this doesn't amount to a much greater project than I am anticipating.
     
  5. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    Messages:
    6,130
    Likes Received:
    77
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2011
    Location:
    Steinbach, MB
    If the glue holding down the vinyl flooring has already let go and the vinyl is separated from the subfloor, it might work to just replace the floor and glue the vinyl back down but if that's the case, the paper backing will most likely be badly stained and you'll see it through the vinyl.

    If you're hoping to peel back the flooring without damaging the paper backing, I seriously doubt you'll achieve much success. You MIGHT be able to peel it back if you start in a corner and carefully use an oscillating tool with a scraper blade to remove the vinyl while maintaining the slightest tension on the vinyl as you peel it back.

    This takes off most of the flooring adhesive with the paper backing and leaves the subfloor largely intact so that with minimal patching, you can lay new vinyl right down over it. It's painstaking and time consuming, especially in high traffic areas but I've done entire rooms like this just to avoid damaging the subfloor along with the expense and labor involved in replacing it.

    Realistically, even if you're not going to remove the cabinets, you'd do well to replace the vinyl entirely. Whether you find a suitable remnant at a flooring shop or you choose to use a decent quality peel-n-stick flooring, it'll look and hold up a lot better than the old vinyl after you've glued it down again. Oh, and if you're going to glue down vinyl, use a floor roller to get a good bond or the vinyl will lift and curl over time.

    At any rate, if you do decide to peel back and reinstall the old vinyl with paper backing, use the correct flooring adhesive and not contact cement. Contact cement will probably bleed through the paper and give the vinyl a yellow tint so that it really becomes evident that you've patched it.

    It's your dime and your time but that's my [2C]
     
  6. banks412

    banks412 New Member

    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2013
    Wondering if I can replace my floor without removing the sides/walls. Is that possible? If so, I might be convinced to replace the entire floor, but my understanding was that the walls had to be taken off, the roof, etc....and that's just not something I'm prepared to do. If the floor could be replaced by only removing the cabinetry, I might be able to pull it off.

    Thoughts?
     
  7. cullinan18

    cullinan18 New Member

    Messages:
    430
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2012
    Thanks for the tips, Dubbya.

    How extensive is the rot, Banks? I've seen some threads where the pup is stripped to the frame. Perhaps that's the best way to do it. That's way beyond my skill level or available time. I've also seen class C threads where they only cut out the rotten section without replacing the entire floor.

    Do what'll make you happy and proud of her again.
     
  8. banks412

    banks412 New Member

    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2013
    Well, I looked at it this afternoon, and apparently the OBS floor extends out past the metal frame a few inches on each of the sides. Not sure about the front. The skin of the sides does in fact sit directly on top of the entire wood sub-floor, and I guess it makes sense. It has to. My only saving grace is the corners and ends are really all that's rotted, and they're covered with the cabinets/seats, so it's not being walked on, but when sitting down, I guess some of the weight is being transferred to those corners. I've even thought about just reinforcing the floor from underneath with some additional right angle steel to act as a 'lip' and help support the floor, but I don't know if it would make much difference.

    Without removing the whole box (sidewalls, etc...) I'm not sure how I could even replace just a section of the floor. How would I get the old out and the new in? As much as I hate to say it, I can't help but think maybe I should cut my losses and sell her this fall to the deer hunters and save for another or go to the dark side. This is my first PuP/travel trailer ever, so I was pretty ignorant with respect to what should be looked for in the floor. As I move forward I'd at least know what to pay attention to. I'm just not sure I have the time or inclination to try this extensive a repair. Man, I'm bummed right now. I don't want to part with her, but at the same time I don't think I can fix this.
     
  9. Dubbya

    Dubbya Wherever you go, there you are...

    Messages:
    6,130
    Likes Received:
    77
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2011
    Location:
    Steinbach, MB
    I've read posts where members have removed the canvas, roof, then the entire body in one piece, replaced the floor then put the body back on in a weekend. It'll take some help, some floor space and coordination of effort, but it might be worth looking into.

    You can probably replace the whole floor and have it all done for $300-$500.

    On the other hand, if you sell it "as is", you might be able to make back your initial investment and start from scratch.

    I can certainly see where that would be a tempting alternative.

    If it makes you feel better, I spent $2200 buying my pup and a lot more time and money restoring the lift system floor, walls and roof. The moral of the story? Education cost money!

    Am I glad I did it? Yes. Did I enjoy it? Absolutely! Did I learn a lot during the process? Undoubtedly! Would I do it again? Not a chance!
     

Share This Page