Fly Fishing - Any advice?

Discussion in 'Fishing' started by ecupcar, May 21, 2012.

  1. ecupcar

    ecupcar New Member

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    I have been a fairly active fisherman my entire life, its not my main hobby by any stretch, but I like it and have always been active in the sport. Thinking of taking on Fly Fishing. Any suggestions or good sites to do some research? Or any outings in the Midwest where I can join/attend to learn?

    It seems to be a little more expensive/intensive than putting a worm on a hook and waiting for a bluegill to bite, but I think I am up for it.

    Appreciate your thoughts.
     
  2. Flyfisherman

    Flyfisherman New Member

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    The "sport" can become very obsessive, way beyond habit. Here's a great site I belong to:

    http://www.flyanglersonline.com/

    Now, the problem with this site is they really get into splitting hairs on minor issues ... makes Popupportal look like a day in the country!
     
  3. BillNH60

    BillNH60 a bad day camping is just better than working

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    I was into fly fishing years ago, my advice is practice, a lot. [:D] You need to learn how to put the fly exactly where you want it, its not as easy as it looks until you pracrice. I used my fathers back yard and put out pieces of paper as targets, when I could place the fly near enough to them I was ready to go fishing. There was an awesome trout stream about a 100 feet from his house.
     
  4. ecupcar

    ecupcar New Member

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    Thanks guys
     
  5. Dienamic

    Dienamic New Member

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    Best advise I got when I started was not to let the rod tip get much past your shoulder on the back stroke. If you get lazy on the backstroke your forward stroke suffers horribly. Also was told to slow down. Almost a metronome <sP?> cadence. One...two...one...two...
     
  6. PDieter

    PDieter Member

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    maybe one of these clubs is near you. They generally have both classes and outings. It's a good idea to learn how to cast in a class setting so that your time fishing is much less frustrating.

    http://www.flycaster.com/clubs/llinois3.html
     
  7. Kim Ciara

    Kim Ciara Trout Tickler

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    Since you've already spent many years fishing other methods, fly fishing should come easily to you. Instead of the lure, bobber, or spoon, or whatever providing the weight to get your line out there, the fly line provides the weight. Once you grasp that concept, then you'll learn quickly. Some people seem to catch on straight away, while others have to work a little more to get there.

    Ask your friends if they have a fly rod you can borrow for a couple of weeks. It doesn't have to be a good one... cheap will do for a couple of weeks. Tie a piece of brightly colored yarn (about an inch) to the end of the tippet, and practice casting in your yard. Put some kind of a target down on the grass about twenty feet away... a paper plate, or something like that, and practice hitting it. Accuracy is one of the most important things you'll learn! Once you can consistently put that little piece of yarn on it, then you're good to go! And at that point, you can make the distance longer. Most all casting you'll do will be 30 feet or less, and that all depends on the waters you're fishing, but the 30 feet or less will be the 'norm'.

    Hire a guide, at least once. He or she will help you correct mistakes or bad habits. They'll put you on fish immediately (or should be able to do that!), and you'll have a great time, learn lots, and pick up lots of important tips on everything from tying the perfect knot, to fly selection (although fly selection really takes a good understanding of aquatic entomology!), to fly presentation, to different kinds of casts, to gear selection, to you name it! They'll also provide you with really great gear, and most guides do this at no additional cost. You'll immediately see and feel the difference between good gear and great gear. (Did I mention that this new hobby of yours can become an obsession? hahah)

    You can get good gear (not great gear)... rod, reel, line, net, stream-side tools, etc., for about $300.00, stuff that will last you a lifetime if you care for it and don't abuse it. Craigslist can also have some great finds!

    I'm a huge Orvis fan... they're now making the Clearwater rods/combo outfits. It's really good gear with the 25-year garuntee. A combo will cost around that $300.00 mark. Other fly-rod makers have similar package deals, and some can get you into the sport at about half that much, or even a little cheaper. Reddington makes nice, inexpensive packages, too, that's not bad stuff at all!

    Great gear... you can spend a fortune on it! hahah (I know this by experience) But if fly fishing becomes an obsession (and it often does), you'll one day want the great gear.

    Many cities with fly fishing in the area also have social groups that are great! You'll meet lots of nice people that are eager to share their knowledge with you, and most groups have 'group outings' and camping trips to nice fishing waters, rivers, streams, or ponds/lakes. Search for these groups in your area, or just ask someone at a local fly shop. They'll know who these groups are.

    Most people associate fly fishing with trout, but all species, warm and cold water alike, can be caught on fly gear! Anything from bluegills to crappie, to bass, to pike, to trout, to saltwater fish, as well.

    Good luck to you!
     

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