genarator question

Discussion in 'Power - Site Power/Batteries/Generators/Solar' started by Scott A Pratt, Oct 13, 2019.

  1. Scott A Pratt

    Scott A Pratt New Member

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    is this big enough to run my a/c and a tv at the same time or should I hook 2 of them togather
     

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  2. NMroamer

    NMroamer Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely not. Not sure two in parallel would be enough.
     
  3. Arruba

    Arruba Active Member

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    Is your AC unit a roof top unit or a little window unit? If roof top unit then absolutely not, as already mentioned. Most of those require 4000 watt and up for the AC alone. If a window unit then maybe.

    The thing to look at is the rating on both the generator and thing(s) to be powered. A lot of generators advertise being an XX watt generator, what that is is their surge capacity. Their running capacity is something else. Same goes for appliances. They often have a starting and running rating. Your generator needs to be sized to handle both.

    Hope that helps and good luck.
     
  4. joet

    joet Well-Known Member

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    With 2 you would have ample power for your A/C. 1 isn't big enough to power the A/C
     
  5. West Coast Canuck

    West Coast Canuck Jumped to the dark side ......

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    You need to find out the running watts...1600 is peak watts and running is sustained watts. To convert watts to amp, here is the formula. For instance, 1600 watts divided by 120 volts = 13.3 amps so if your AC unit requires 20 amps multiply it by 120 = 2400 watts. I am guessing the generator will have 1250 sustained watts divided by 120 volts = 15 amps
     
  6. West Coast Canuck

    West Coast Canuck Jumped to the dark side ......

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    You can also add a hard start capacitor to your AC unit to reduce the starting amperage to. Most of the the AC amperage will be at compressor start up
     
  7. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    Sjm9911 likes this.
  8. bheff

    bheff Well-Known Member

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    Snow is just being nice and offering power to all his neighbors as well.....lol
     
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  9. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

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    1600/2000 isn't enough.

    I have a 13500 btu AC on my TT. A 3500/4000 watt generator has no trouble powering my whole trailer, though.
     
  10. davekro

    davekro Active Member

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    Generous ( generating ;)) to a fault powering the entire village!
     
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  11. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    Actually it's back up for the house..lol but it does have a 50amp plug and I have a 50amp to 30amp adapter..
     
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  12. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    Dont make me take my generator with me please. Just dont. Another thing to carry! Gas to boot. Dam you all!
     
  13. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

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    I just returned from a 1500 mile road trip. My generator was in the truck bed with a fitted cover on it. I carried it in case we needed to boondock a day or two. Never needed it, but it was nice knowing we had our own power source if needed.
     
  14. brwarrior

    brwarrior Active Member

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    Grab a second one and parallel them. They come with all the paralleling parts and an L5-30 to TT-30 adapter which you should have anyways (assuming you bought it at Costco, they are $450 in my area now). I keep one set of stuff (accessories that come with the generator) in the truck, one in the trailer.
     
  15. BillyMc

    BillyMc Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the AC. I wouldn't try running my 13500 Coleman AC with it. A 5000 to 8000 BTU window unit should be fine. Two of them paralleled should allow you to use your full 30 amp.
     
  16. David Blackwell

    David Blackwell Member

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    You really need to measure the current loads or find the manufacturer's specifications. Guessing or using the trial/error approach can waste a lot of time/money. The following was my solution.

    My 2017 Aliner came with the Dometic 10.15k BTU Cool Cat air conditioner/heat pump. Dometic states that the locked rotation amps, sometimes abbreviated LRA (also known as surge) is 50.0 amps AC (120v). Running the Cool Cat required two Honda 2000 generators in parallel. I was able to measure this unit over 3 test runs as requiring: Approx. 2 amps to start running the fan for about 30 seconds; then the compressor would start/surge to 44.1 amps (approx. 5300 watts peak for about 0.5 seconds); and then taper off to about 9 amps for the rest of the cycle. It would then drop to 2 amps on fan only until another cycle begins.

    My primary goal of measuring was to figure out a way to avoid the weight of carrying two generators. After quite a bit of research, I found the Microair.com website. As mentioned above, it's similar to a soft/hard start capacitor, but it has a learning function that maps the current demand/load so it "learns" the minimum requirements of the compressor. I can now run my air conditioner on a single Honda 2000 generator. The A/C doesn't immediately snap on, as it did running on a 30 amp circuit, but takes a minute longer to slowly build up and start producing cold air.

    Aside from keeping the better half cool (happy), Generators are imho a last resort. Solar is always the preferred solution. I've also grown up cursing "those" people who run generators, and now that I'm "that" person, I try to be super sensitive about the amount of generator noise and when I'm running it. In order to mitigate the sound I have an RV generator box lined with noise reducing panels (Dynamat). I then connect a high temp silicon hose to the generator which is routed to a Camco exhaust chimney. This mitigates some of the noise and nearly all of the exhaust fumes (think CO). Frankly, after a lot of effort, the sound is noticeably less but it's still a nuisance to any nearby neighbors.

    See also: https://www.popupportal.com/threads/generator-suggestions.126711/#post-1305356
    microair.com
    Search on YouTube as well
     

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